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  1. Detection of zoonotic intestinal parasites in public parks of Spain. Potential epidemiological role of microsporidia

    Contributor(s):: Dado, D., Izquierdo, F., Vera, O., Montoya, A., Mateo, M., Fenoy, S., Galvan, A. L., Garcia, S., Garcia, A., Aranguez, E., Lopez, L., del Aguila, C., Miro, G.

  2. DNA detection and genotypic identification of potentially human-pathogenic microsporidia from asymptomatic pet parrots in South Korea as a risk factor for zoonotic emergence

    Contributor(s):: Lee, So-Young, Lee, Sung-Seok, Lyoo, Young S., Park, Hee-Myung

  3. Microsporidia in household dogs and cats in Iran: a zoonotic concern

    Contributor(s):: Jamshidi, Sh., Tabrizi, A. Shojaee, Bahrami, M., Momtaz, H.

  4. Pet dogs--a transmission route for human noroviruses?

    Contributor(s):: Summa, M., von Bonsdorff, C. H., Maunula, L.

  5. Sentinel surveillance for zoonotic parasites in companion animals in indigenous communities of Saskatchewan

    Contributor(s):: Schurer, J. M., Hill, J. E., Fernando, C., Jenkins, E. J.

  6. A case study: fecal corticosteroid and behavior as indicators of welfare during relocation of an Asian elephant

    Contributor(s):: Laws, N., Ganswindt, A., Heistermann, M., Harris, M., Harris, S., Sherwin, C.

    This study was a preliminary investigation of an enzyme immunoassay for measuring fecal glucocorticoid metabolites in a male Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) by investigating changes in behavior and cortisol metabolite excretion associated with a putative stressful event. The study collected...

  7. A survey of attitudes of local citizens of a residential area toward urban stray cats in Japan

    Contributor(s):: Uetake, K., Yamada, S., Yano, M., Tanaka, T.

    This study surveyed the attitudes of local residents living in an urban area in Japan toward stray cats. An anonymous questionnaire asked local residents (359 houses) about their attitudes toward stray cats. Responses were received from 126 houses (35%). Answers about nuisance, respondents'...

  8. Effect of breed, cage type, and reproductive phase on fecal corticosterone levels in doe rabbits

    Contributor(s):: Prola, L., Cornale, P., Renna, M., Macchi, E., Perona, G., Mimosi, A.

    Fecal corticosterone concentration (FCC) is increasingly being used as a noninvasive indicator of stress in assessment of nonhuman animal welfare. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of breed, cage type, reproductive phase, and their interactions on FCC levels in doe rabbits. A total of...

  9. Frustrated appetitive foraging behavior, stereotypic pacing, and fecal glucocorticoid levels in snow leopards ( Uncia uncia ) in the Zurich Zoo

    Contributor(s):: Burgener, N., Gusset, M., Schmid, H.

    This study hypothesized that permanently frustrated, appetitive-foraging behavior caused the stereotypic pacing regularly observed in captive carnivores. Using 2 adult female snow leopards (U), solitarily housed in the Zurich Zoo, the study tested this hypothesis experimentally with a novel...

  10. Impact of zoo visitors on the fecal cortisol levels and behavior of an endangered species: Indian blackbuck ( Antelope cervicapra L.)

    Contributor(s):: Thangavel, Rajagopal, Govindaraju, Archunan, Mahadevan, Sekar

    This study investigated behavioral activities (resting, moving, aggressive, social, and reproductive behavior) and fecal cortisol levels in 8 individually identified adult male blackbucks during periods of varying levels of zoo visitors (zero, low, high, and extremely high zoo visitor density)....

  11. Abnormal behaviour in captive sooty mangabeys

    Contributor(s):: Crast, J., Bloomsmith, M. A., Perlman, J. E., Meeker, T. L., Remillard, C. M.

    The influence of several factors on abnormal behaviour was investigated in 46 singly housed sooty mangabeys ( Cercocebus atys) (eight nursery-reared, 38 mother-reared), including self-injurious, self-directed, stereotypic locomotion, and faeces/urine-related behaviours (SIB, SDB, SL, FUR,...

  12. Behaviour and welfare in donkeys during therapies and activities assisted with animals (AAT/AAA) simulation

    Contributor(s):: Amendola, S., Macchi, E., Rasola, M., Carluccio, A., Marsilio, F., Contri, A., Sfirro, M. P., Ponzio, P.

  13. Effect of housing and husbandry practices on adrenocortical activity in captive Canada lynx ( Lynx canadensis)

    Contributor(s):: Fanson, K. V., Wielebnowski, N. C.

  14. Hormonal stress response of laboratory mice to conventional and minimally invasive bleeding techniques

    Contributor(s):: Voigt, C. C., Klockner, P., Touma, C., Neuschl, C., Brockmann, G., Goritz, F., Palme, R., Thomsen, R.

  15. Influence of environmental conditions and facility on faecal glucocorticoid concentrations in captive pygmy rabbits ( Brachylagus idahoensis)

    Contributor(s):: Scarlata, C. D., Elias, B. A., Godwin, J. R., Powell, R. A., Shepherdson, D., Shipley, L. A., Brown, J. L.

  16. Measuring faecal glucocorticoid metabolites as a non-invasive tool for monitoring adrenocortical activity in South American camelids

    Contributor(s):: Arias, N., Requena, M., Palme, R.

  17. Providing 'get-away bunks' and other enrichments to primiparous adult female mink improves their reproductive productivity

    Contributor(s):: Buob, M., Meagher, R., Dawson, L., Palme, R., Haley, D., Mason, G.

  18. What is the relationship between level of infection and 'sickness behaviour' in cattle?

    Contributor(s):: Szyszka, O., Kyriazakis, I.

  19. National dog walking survey

    Contributor(s):: Lowe, C.

  20. Can non-invasive glucocorticoid measures be used as reliable indicators of stress in animals?

    Contributor(s):: Lane, J.