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  1. A Ten-Stage Protocol for Assessing the Welfare of Individual Non-Captive Wild Animals: Free-Roaming Horses (Equus Ferus Caballus) as an Example

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Andrea M. Harvey, Ngaio J. Beausoleil, Daniel Ramp, David J. Mellor

    Knowledge of the welfare status of wild animals is vital for informing debates about the ways in which we interact with wild animals and their habitats. Currently, there is no published information about how to scientifically assess the welfare of free-roaming wild animals during their normal...

  2. Pampered pets or poor bastards? The welfare of dogs kept as companion animals

    | Contributor(s):: Meyer, Iben, Forkman, Björn, Fredholm, Merete, Glanville, Carmen, Guldbrandtsen, Bernt, Ruiz Izaguirre, Eliza, Palmer, Clare, Sandøe, Peter

    Over the past two centuries, the typical life of dogs has changed dramatically, especially in the Global North. Dogs have moved into human homes, becoming human companions. In many respects, this change seems to have led to improvements in dog welfare. However, the shift into family homes from...

  3. The Implications of Policies on the Welfare of Free-Roaming Cats in New Zealand

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sumner, Christine L., Walker, Jessica K., Dale, Arnja R.

    A lack of national legislation for cat management in New Zealand poses challenges for ensuring that practices are consistently humane and effective. In this paper, we review the current cat management policies in New Zealand and the implications they have on the welfare of free-roaming cats...

  4. Coping with human-cat interactions beyond the limits of domesticity: moral pluralism in the management of cats and wildlife

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Wandesforde-Smith, G., Levy, J. K., Lynn, W., Rand, J., Riley, S., Schaffner, J. E., Wolf, P. J.

    Although human interactions with cats are often even typically analyzed in the context of domesticity, with a focus on what sorts of interactions might make both people and cats "happy at home," a large number of cats in the world live, for one reason or another, beyond the bounds of...

  5. Back to School: An Updated Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Long-Term Trap-Neuter-Return Program on a University's Free-Roaming Cat Population

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Daniel D. Spehar, Peter J. Wolf

    A growing body of evidence indicates that trap-neuter-return (TNR) is not only effective at reducing community cat numbers, but that such reductions are sustainable over extended periods. Recently, a series of peer-reviewed articles documenting long-term declines in community cat populations...

  6. Coexistence of diversified dog socialities and territorialities in the city of Concepcion, Chile

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Miternique, H. C., Gaunet, F.

    There has been scant research on the presence of stray dogs in cities. Studying their very considerable presence in Concepción (Chile) provided a unique opportunity to learn more about the different patterns of sociality and territoriality exhibited by the dog species. Via a set of case...

  7. The Significance of Social Perceptions in Implementing Successful Feral Cat Management Strategies: A Global Review

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Brooke P. Deak, Bertram Ostendorf, David A. Taggart, David E. Peacock, Douglas K. Bardsley

    This review examines the social aspects that influence feral cat management. In particular, it examines definitions and perceptions of feral cats as a species in different countries and across cultures. Using case studies from around the world, we investigate the factors that can influence...

  8. Editorial: Sustaining Innovation in Compassionate Free-Roaming Cat Management Across the Globe: A Decadal Reappraisal of the Practice and Promise of Trap-Neuter-Vaccinate-Return (TNVR)

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Joan E. Schaffner, Geoffrey Wandesforde-Smith, Peter Joseph Wolf, Julie Levy, Sophie Riley, Mark James Farnworth6

  9. An Evaluation of Systematic Versus Strategically-Placed Camera Traps for Monitoring Feral Cats in New Zealand

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Margaret Nichols, James Ross, Alistair S. Glen, Adrian M. Paterson

    We deploy camera traps to monitor feral cat (Felis catus) populations at two pastoral sites in Hawke’s Bay, North Island, New Zealand. At Site 1, cameras are deployed at pre-determined GPS points on a 500-m grid, and at Site 2, cameras are strategically deployed with a bias towards forest...

  10. The cohabitation of humans and urban cats in the anthropocene: the clash of welfare concepts

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jaros, F.

    Urban environments are inhabited by several types of feline populations, which we can differentiate as feral cats, free-roaming pets, and confined pets. Due to a shift in the cultural representation of cats from pest controllers to companion animals, cats living semi-independently of humans are...

  11. Validation of Application SuperDuplicates (AS) Enumeration Tool for Free-Roaming Dogs (FRD) in Urban Settings of Panchkula Municipal Corporation in North India

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Harish Kumar Tiwari, Ian D. Robertson, Mark O’Dea, Jully Gogoi-Tiwari, Pranav Panvalkar, Rajinder Singh Bajwa, Abi Tamim Vanak

    A cost-effective estimation of the number of free-roaming dogs is an essential prerequisite for the control of rabies in countries where the disease is endemic, as vaccination of at least 70% of the population is recommended to effectively control the disease. Although estimating the population...

  12. Village Dogs in Coastal Mexico The Street as a Place to Belong

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Ruiz-Izaguirre, E., Hebinck, P., Eilers, K.

    Village dogs are important for households in coastal Mexico, yet they are seen as out of place by etic stakeholders (public health and wildlife experts, and animal welfarists). Caregivers of village dogs are considered irresponsible, a view that is reinforced by Mexican policy. We describe two...

  13. Our Wild Companions: Domestic cats in the Anthropocene

    | Contributor(s):: Crowley, S. L., Cecchetti, M., McDonald, R. A.

  14. Human–dog interactions and behavioural responses of village dogs in coastal villages in Michoacán, Mexico

    | Contributor(s):: Ruiz-Izaguirre, Eliza, Eilers, Karen H. A. M., Bokkers, Eddie A. M., Ortolani, Alessia, Ortega-Pacheco, Antonio, de Boer, Imke J. M.

    In Mexican villages, most households keep dogs that roam freely. Therefore, socialisation of village dogs occurs in a different context than that of companion dogs in developed countries. The objectives of this study were: (1) to assess village dogs’ behavioural responses towards familiar and...

  15. Opinions from the Front Lines of Cat Colony Management Conflict

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: M. Nils Peterson, Brett Hartis, Shari Rodriguez, Matthew Green, Christopher A. Lepczyk

    Outdoor cats represent a global threat to terrestrial vertebrate conservation, but management has been rife with conflict due to differences in views of the problem and appropriate responses to it. To evaluate these differences we conducted a survey of opinions about outdoor cats and their...

  16. The Impact of an Integrated Program of Return-to-Field and Targeted Trap-Neuter-Return on Feline Intake and Euthanasia at a Municipal Animal Shelter

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Daniel D Spehar, Peter J Wolf

    Available evidence indicates that overall levels of feline intake and euthanasia at U.S. shelters have significantly declined in recent decades. Nevertheless, millions of cats, many of them free-roaming, continue to be admitted to shelters each year. In some locations, as many as 70% of cats,...

  17. A Case Study in Citizen Science: The Effectiveness of a Trap-Neuter-Return Program in a Chicago Neighborhood

    | Contributor(s):: Daniel D. Spehar, Peter J. Wolf

    The use of trap-neuter-return (TNR) as a method of managing free-roaming cat populations has increased in the United States in recent decades. Historically, TNR has been conducted most often at a grassroots level, which has led to inconsistent data collection and assessment practices....

  18. Pine Irwin

    https://habricentral.org/members/4004

  19. An Examination of an Iconic Trap-Neuter-Return Program: The Newburyport, Massachusetts Case Study

    | Contributor(s):: David D. Spehar, Peter J. Wolf

    Local communities in the United States are commonly responsible for selecting the most appropriate method of managing free-roaming cats. Lethal management has been widely utilized for generations, but the use of trap–neuter–return (TNR) has grown in recent decades. Despite expanded...

  20. Life after academia -- helping homeless dogs | LC Ricke | TEDxLeeCollegeHuntsville

    For most professors, getting denied tenure is the end of their career. For LC Ricke, it was only the beginning. In this intriguing talk, LC argues that people with graduate degrees have a significant amount of skills to offer the world outside the Ivory Tower.LC is the founder and director of...