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  1. Effect of an early bitter taste experience on subsequent feather-pecking behaviour in laying hens

    Contributor(s):: Matauschek, A. H., Beck, P., Rodenburg, T. B.

    Recent studies showed that laying hens learn not to peck at bitter-tasting feathers from conspecifics. In the present experiment, feathers of newly hatched chicks were made distasteful by spraying them with a bitter-tasting substance (quinine). It was hypothesized that chicks could detect quinine...

  2. Effect of male-to-male aggressiveness and feed-restriction during rearing on sexual behaviour and aggressiveness towards females by male domestic fowl

    Contributor(s):: Millman, S. T., Duncan, I. J. H.

    This experiment was one part of a larger study investigating problems of aggression towards females by male broiler breeder fowl. To investigate causal mechanisms, we were interested in determining (1) if feed-restriction during rearing affects behaviour towards females at sexual maturity and (2)...

  3. Effect of manipulating feathers of laying hens on the incidence of feather pecking and cannibalism

    Contributor(s):: McAdie, T. M., Keeling, L. J.

    Feather pecking was studied in 16 groups of 11 Lohmann Brown hens between 26 and 28 weeks of age. The feather pecks were classified separately as either gentle or severe. Damaged feathers received significantly more severe feather pecks than undamaged feathers. There were also more gentle feather...

  4. Effects of age, sex and social isolation on contrafreeloading in red junglefowl ( Gallus gallus ) and White Leghorn fowl

    Contributor(s):: Lindqvist, C., Jensen, P.

    Contrafreeloading (CFL), i.e. choosing to work to obtain food over free food, has been studied in many different species. White Leghorn laying hens selected for high production have a lower extent of CFL compared to their wild ancestor, red junglefowl. We studied the effects of age, sex and...

  5. Effects of an acute stressor on fear and on the social reinstatement responses of domestic chicks to cagemates and strangers

    Contributor(s):: Marin, R. H., Freytes, P., Guzman, D., Jones, R. B.

    Genetic selection for appropriate levels of sociality (motivation to be with conspecifics) could benefit poultry welfare and performance. Runway tests that require chicks to traverse a corridor in order to reach other chicks in a goal box are commonly used to measure this behavioural trait....

  6. Effects of crowding and access to perches on aggressive behaviour in broilers

    Contributor(s):: Pettit-Riley, R., Estevez, I., Russek-Cohen, E.

    To test the hypothesis that the frequency of aggression in broiler chickens will be lower in response to increased crowding and perch availability, groups of broilers were observed from 2 to 6 weeks of age. A total of 2424 broilers were used in the study. Both the type of aggression and the pen...

  7. Effects of density on perching behavior of broiler chickens

    Contributor(s):: Pettit-Riley, R., Estevez, I.

    Exercise through perching has been suggested as a way to reduce the impact of leg problems in broiler chickens. It is possible that higher stocking densities may motivate birds to perch more, and perhaps reduce some of the detrimental effects to broiler health seen with high stocking densities....

  8. Effects of haloperidol, a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, on feather pecking behaviour in laying hens

    Contributor(s):: Kjaer, J. B., Hjarvard, B. M., Jensen, K. H., Hansen-Moller, J., Larsen, O. N.

    Two experiments investigating general behavioural activity and specific pecking behaviour in laying hens under the effect of a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, haloperidol, were performed. In experiment 1, a total of 240 White Leghorn hens aged 70 weeks were housed in 30 floor pens. Fifty-five of...

  9. Effects of qualitative and quantitative feed restriction on the activity of broiler chickens

    Contributor(s):: Nielsen, B. L., Litherland, M., Noddegaard, F.

    Diurnal patterns and time courses of activity were investigated in groups of fast-growing broilers subjected to different levels of qualitative and quantitative feed restrictions. Eight groups of 225 female Ross 208 broiler chickens were reared from 1 to 57 days of age in straw-bedded floor pens...

  10. Effects of qualitative and quantitative food restriction treatments on feeding motivational state and general activity level of growing broiler breeders

    Contributor(s):: Savory, C. J., Lariviere, J. M.

    Growing broiler breeder chickens are fed restricted rations to limit body weight at sexual maturity. This experiment tested a proposal (Brouns, F. et al. Applied Animal Behaviour Sciience (1994) 39, 215-223.) that feeding motivation is reduced by using qualitative rather than quantitative food...

  11. Exploratory behaviour of young domestic fowl

    Contributor(s):: Newberry, R. C.

    Under the hypothesis that young domestic fowl are motivated to seek opportunities to explore novel stimuli, it was predicted that broiler chickens would show greater motivation to enter peripheral space if it contained (a) novel objects (changed daily) than if it was (b) empty or contained (c)...

  12. Factors involved in the improvement of the use of hen runs

    Contributor(s):: Zeltner, E., Hirt, H.

    Free-range systems improve the welfare of laying hens. However, hen runs are often used only close to the poultry house and only a small proportion of hens are outside. Several studies indicate that structuring elements in the hen run improve the frequency and distribution of hens in the run. In...

  13. Feather damaging behaviour in parrots: a review with consideration of comparative aspects

    Contributor(s):: Zeeland, Y. R. A. van, Spruit, B. M., Rodenburg, T. B., Riedstra, B., Hierden, Y. M. van, Buitenhuis, B., Korte, S. M., Lumeij, J. T.

    Feather damaging behaviour (also referred to as feather picking or feather plucking) is a behavioural disorder that is frequently encountered in captive parrots. This disorder has many characteristics that are similar to trichotillomania, an impulse control disorder in humans. Unfortunately, to...

  14. Feather eating in individually caged hens which differ in their propensity to feather peck

    Contributor(s):: McKeegan, D. E. F., Savory, C. J.

    Two experiments examined the responses of 16 individually caged laying hens to the presentation of feathers plucked from dead birds of the same genetic line. In the first experiment, hens known from a previous experiment to be either feather peckers or non-peckers (8 of each) were tested for...

  15. Feather eating in layer pullets and its possible role in the aetiology of feather pecking damage

    Contributor(s):: McKeegan, D. E. F., Savory, C. J.

    Feather eating and its possible relationship with damaging pecking was examined in 144 pen-housed ISA Brown layer pullets. Collection and measurement of loose feathers in sample plots on 12 pen floors (feather were characterized as 'short' or 'long'), and examination of faecal droppings (eaten...

  16. Feather pecking and cannibalism in free-range laying hens as affected by genotype, dietary level of methionine+cystine, light intensity during rearing and age at first access to the range area

    Contributor(s):: Kjaer, J. B., Sorensen, P.

    An experimental small-scale free-range system was used in the two experiments reported here and consisted of 24 independent units. Experiment 1 was designed to test genotype and level of dietary methionine+cystine. Four genotypes were used: ISA brown (ISA), New Hampshire (NH), White Leghorn (WL)...

  17. Form but not frequency of beak use by hens is changed by housing system

    Contributor(s):: Shimmura, T., Suzuki, T., Azuma, T., Hirahara, S., Eguchi, Y., Uetake, K., Tanaka, T.

    In order to verify the hypothesis that hens in different housing systems have the same time budget for different beak-related behaviours, we compared the pecking behaviour of hens in six housing systems: small (SC) and large (LC) conventional cages, small (SF) and large (LF) furnished cages,...

  18. Group size and perching behaviour in young domestic fowl

    Contributor(s):: Newberry, R. C., Estevez, I., Keeling, L. J.

    To test the hypothesis that young domestic fowl perform less perch-related antipredator behaviour with increasing group size, White Leghorn pullets were reared in 4 replicate groups of 15, 30, 60 and 120 at a constant density of 5 birds/m2. Each pen contained perches 20, 40 and 60 cm above the...

  19. How important is social facilitation for dustbathing in laying hens?

    Contributor(s):: Olsson, I. A. S., Duncan, I. J. H., Keeling, L. J., Widowski, T. M.

    Hens in a group usually synchronize dust bathing, such that when one hen starts to dust bathe she will often be joined by others. The sight of another hen dust bathing could thus possibly act as a stimulus increasing motivation for dust bathing, with important implications for hens in furnished...

  20. Influence of mothering on emotional and social reactivity of domestic pullets

    Contributor(s):: Perre, Y., Wauters, A. M., Richard-Yris, M. A.

    The aim of this study was to determine whether different early mothering experiences influenced emotional and social reactivity of sub-adults and adults in domestic fowl. We compared two types of individuals: brooded and non-brooded pullets. Brooded pullets were reared by a maternal hen during...