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  1. Acute stress enhances sensitivity to a highly attractive food reward without affecting judgement bias in laying hens

    Contributor(s):: Hernandez, C. E., Hinch, G., Lea, J., Ferguson, D., Lee, C.

    Affective states can be evaluated by assessing shifts in the animal's expectation of a positive and negative outcome in response to ambiguous cues, also known as judgement bias (JB). The aim of this study was to use a JB methodology, using a go/go type of task where animals are required to make...

  2. Broiler chicken welfare assessment in GLOBALGAP certified and non-certified farms in Brazil

    Contributor(s):: Souza, A., Oliveira Sans, E. C. de, Muller, B. R., Molento, C. F. M.

    Regarding broilers, Brazil is the third largest producer and the leading chicken meat exporter in the world. Independent certifications are required by some importers in the European Union (EU) to guarantee compliance with minimum welfare requirements. Our objective was to compare broiler chicken...

  3. Development of early foraging behaviour of domestic chicks in varying social contexts

    Contributor(s):: Gajdon, G. K., Mundwiler, B., Stauffacher, M.

    Two aspects of foraging development might be crucial to learning in precocial chicks: what food particles look like and what food sites look like. Previous research indicates that there are innate dispositions for particle preferences and for preferring the type of food sites experienced between...

  4. Plumage damage in free-range laying hens: behavioural characteristics in the rearing period and the effects of environmental enrichment and beak-trimming

    Contributor(s):: Hartcher, K. M., Tran, M. K. T. N., Wilkinson, S. J., Hemsworth, P. H., Thomson, P. C., Cronin, G. M.

    Severe feather-pecking, whereby birds peck at and pull out the feathers of other birds, is one of the greatest welfare concerns and the most prevalent behavioural problem in laying hens. It can be extremely difficult to control, especially in non-cage laying flocks. Despite a multitude of studies...

  5. The relevance of variations in group size and phenotypic appearance on the behaviour and movement patterns of young domestic fowl

    Contributor(s):: Liste, G., Campderrich, I., Beltran Heredia, I. de, Estevez, I.

    Variations in the group size of laying hens might increase the risk of undesired behaviours with important consequences for the birds' health and welfare. However, larger groups housed at constant densities also translate into larger enclosures that may increase space efficiency, therefore...

  6. The risk factors affecting the development of vent pecking and cannibalism in free-range and organic laying hens

    Contributor(s):: Lambton, S. L., Knowles, T. G., Yorke, C., Nicol, C. J.

    Injurious pecking remains one of the biggest animal welfare and economic challenges for free-range egg producers. This prospective epidemiological study investigated the development of vent pecking (VP) and cannibalism on 62 free-range and organic UK farms (119 flocks). Flocks were visited at 25...

  7. The ticking clock: addressing farm animal welfare in emerging countries

    Contributor(s):: Keyserlingk, M. A. G. von, Hotzel, M. J.

    Over the last decade many emerging economies, and in particular Brazil, have established themselves as major players in global food animal production. Within these countries much of the increase in food animal production has been achieved by the adoption of intensive housing systems similar to...

  8. Stakeholder attitudes toward farm animal welfare

    Contributor(s):: Heleski, C. R., Mertig, A. G., Zanella, A. J.

    We developed a survey to measure attitudes toward farm animal welfare, then targeted two US groups considered highly influential in this area: veterinary college faculty members with large animal/food animal emphasis (VCF) and animal science faculty members (ANS). The survey was conducted via...

  9. Killing of spent laying hens using CO 2 in poultry barns

    Contributor(s):: Berg, C., Yngvesson, J., Nimmermark, S., Sandstrom, V., Algers, B.

    In Sweden, laying hens are killed using the following methods: (i) traditional slaughter; (ii) on-farm with CO 2 in a mobile container combined with a grinder; or (iii) with CO 2 inside the barn. The number of hens killed using the latter method has increased. During these killings a veterinarian...

  10. Welfare Quality parameters do not always reflect hen behaviour across the lay cycle in non-cage laying hens

    Contributor(s):: Daigle, C., Siegford, J.

    The integration of outcome-based measurements to animal welfare assessment programmes can provide a new perspective on the individual animal's experience. Identifying variability in individual experiences can facilitate understanding of animals at the periphery of the welfare spectrum, compared...

  11. Zoonoses, public health, and the backyard poultry flock

    Contributor(s):: Grunkemeyer, V. L.

  12. Animal welfare issues in the poultry industry: is there a lesson to be learned? (Special issue: food animal husbandry and the new millennium)

    Contributor(s):: Duncan, I. J. H.

    Many of the conditions in which poultry live and the procedures to which they are subjected compromise their welfare. This article describes these welfare problems in the hope that they may serve as warnings to the rest of animal agriculture, which then might take steps to avoid the same...

  13. Changes in substrate access did not affect early feather-pecking behavior in two strains of laying hen chicks

    Contributor(s):: Dixon, L. M., Duncan, I. J. H.

    Feather pecking, commonly found in flocks of laying hens (Gallus gallus), is detrimental to bird welfare. Thought to cause this problem is the normal housing of layers without a floor substrate. Some evidence suggests that early substrate access decreases later feather pecking. However, there has...

  14. Effect of diet change on the behavior of chicks of an egg-laying strain

    Contributor(s):: Dixon, G., Green, L. E., Nicol, C. J.

    Injurious pecking has serious welfare consequences in flocks of hens kept for egg laying, especially when loose-housed. Frequent diet change is a significant risk for injurious pecking; how the mechanics of diet change influence pecking behavior is unknown. This study investigated the effect of...

  15. Effects of induced molting on the well-being of egg-laying hens

    Contributor(s):: McCowan, B., Schrader, J., DiLorenzo, A. M., Cardona, C., Klingborg, D.

    Induced molting in egg-laying hens is an important method for maximizing hen egg production and quality as well as hen health in commercial settings; however, there is growing societal concern over its effects on hen well-being. Using individual hens as their own controls, this research examined...

  16. Influence of stocking density on tonic immobility, lameness, and tibial dyschondroplasia in broilers

    Contributor(s):: Sanotra, G. S., Lawson, L. G., Vestergaard, K. S.

    This study assessed the effect of stocking density on the development of fear reaction (tonic immobility), lameness (gait), and tibial dyschondroplasia in broiler chicks of mixed sex. During 3 experiments, the study used 49 500 broiler chicks (Ross 208). Of these, 432 focal chicks were randomly...

  17. Quantifying the shelter rabbit population: an analysis of Massachusetts and Rhode Island animal shelters

    Contributor(s):: Cook, A. J., McCobb, E.

    Scholarly work on the nonhuman animal shelter population has widely focused on cats and dogs. As a result, little is known about the population dynamics of domestic rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in shelters. The records from 4 companion animal shelters in Massachusetts and Rhode Island were...

  18. Scientists' assessment of the impact of housing and management on animal welfare

    Contributor(s):: Anonymous

    A total of 22 scientists contributed to a consensus-oriented conceptual framework for assessment of farm animal welfare, addressing priority issues in cattle, pigs, and chickens. They used the Delphi method, in which participants contributed anonymously through e-mail. The framework puts welfare...

  19. Simple cannulation procedure for serial blood sampling through cutaneous ulnar vein in chickens

    Contributor(s):: Bayer, D. M., Mohan, K., Jayakumar, K., Manafi, M., Pavithra, B. H.

    The objective of the study was to collect repeated, low-stress blood samples from the ulnar vein of chickens required for pharmacokinetic studies or hormonal assays. The study used 5 apparently healthy, unsexed, commercial broiler chickens about 6 weeks old and weighing 1.7-1.9 kg for serial...

  20. Special issue: food animal husbandry and the new millennium. (Special issue: food animal husbandry and the new millennium)

    Contributor(s):: Serpell, J. A., Parsons, T. D.

    The special issue contains four articles which evaluate animal welfare in livestock production; also, they give a critical appraisal of the food animal industry during this present time. The first two articles deal mainly on the changing attitudes and public perceptions of animal agriculture in...