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Tags: Glucocorticoids + Animal rights

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  1. A case study: fecal corticosteroid and behavior as indicators of welfare during relocation of an Asian elephant

    Contributor(s):: Laws, N., Ganswindt, A., Heistermann, M., Harris, M., Harris, S., Sherwin, C.

    This study was a preliminary investigation of an enzyme immunoassay for measuring fecal glucocorticoid metabolites in a male Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) by investigating changes in behavior and cortisol metabolite excretion associated with a putative stressful event. The study collected...

  2. Behavioural and hormonal responses to acute surgical stress in sheep

    Contributor(s):: Fell, L. R., Shutt, D. A.

    A combination of plasma cortisol and beta -endorphin measurement, behavioural observation and estimation of aversion to humans (by an arena test) was used to assess the response to the modified mules operation in 6- to 7-month-old Merino wethers. The operation involves the surgical removal of...

  3. Brain measures which tell us about animal welfare

    Contributor(s):: Broom, D. M., Zanella, A. J.

    Studies of the brain inform us about the cognitive abilities of animals and hence, affect the extent to which animals of that species are respected. However, they can also tell us how an individual is likely to be perceiving, attending to, evaluating, coping with, enjoying, or disturbed by its...

  4. Can non-invasive glucocorticoid measures be used as reliable indicators of stress in animals?

    Contributor(s):: Lane, J.

  5. Circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus): a factor to consider during welfare assessment

    Contributor(s):: Menargues, A., Urios, V., Liminana, R., Mauri, M.

    Elevated glucocorticoid levels during an extended time period might be a stress indicator in nonhuman animals. Therefore, knowledge of the circadian pattern of cortisol secretion is very important to correctly interpret data obtained for welfare assessment of animals in captivity through salivary...

  6. Conservation and animal welfare issues arising from forestry practices. (Special Issue: Conservation and animal welfare.)

    Contributor(s):: Blumstein, D. T.

    Forestry practices may directly kill animals as well as destroy and fragment their habitat. Even without habitat destruction, logging and its associated forest management practices (which include road building, re-forestation, and often increased recreational use) create noise, frighten animals,...

  7. Effect of group housing and oral corticosterone administration on weight gain and locomotor development in neonatal rats

    Contributor(s):: Young, L. A., Pavlovska-Teglia, G., Stodulski, G., Hau, J.

  8. Effect of work experience and position in the plow harness on some physiological parameters of horses under field conditions

    Contributor(s):: Aguirre, V., Orihuela, A.

    Six pairs of horses were studied during 6 consecutive days. One horse in each pair had working experience. The position of the 2 animals in the plough harness was alternated each day. Some physical and physiological parameters were measured at different stages during each work day. A split-plot...

  9. Effects of enrichment and housing on cortisol response in juvenile rhesus monkeys

    Contributor(s):: Schapiro, S. J., Bloomsmith, M. A., Kessel, A. L., Shively, C. A.

  10. Effects of social environment on welfare status and sexual behaviour of female pigs. I. Effects of group size

    Contributor(s):: Barnett, J. L., Hemsworth, P. H., Winfield, C. G., Hansen, C.

    The study examined the effects of housing 24 adult female pigs in groups of 2, 4 or 8 with a space allowance of 1.4msuperscript 2 per pig on welfare status, as indicated by plasma free-corticosteroid concentrations and behaviour patterns, and sexual behaviour. Housing gilts in pairs resulted in...

  11. Effects of social environment on welfare status and sexual behaviour of female pigs. II. Effects of space allowance

    Contributor(s):: Hemsworth, P. H., Barnett, J. L., Hansen, C., Winfield, C. G.

    This study examined the effects of housing groups of adult female pigs (6 pigs per group) with a space allowance of 1, 2 or 3 msuperscript 2 per pig on sexual behaviour and welfare status, determined by plasma free-corticosteroid concentrations. A lower percentage of gilts was detected in oestrus...

  12. Environmental enrichment exerts anxiolytic effects in the Indian field mouse ( Mus booduga)

    Contributor(s):: Varman, D. R., Ganapathy, Marimuthu, Rajan, K. E.

  13. Environmental enrichment for maned wolves ( Chrysocyon brachyurus ): group and individual effects

    Contributor(s):: Vasconcellos, A. S., Guimaraes, M. A. B. V., Oliveira, C. A., Pizzutto, C. S., Ades, C.

    Procedures that increase foraging and exploratory behaviours are generally accepted as effective at improving welfare and reducing stereotypies in captive animals. To determine the effect of food and toy enrichment on the behaviour and hormonal levels of maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus), 11...

  14. Euthanasia methods, corticosterone and haematocrit levels in Xenopus laevis : evidence for differences in stress?

    Contributor(s):: Archard, G. A., Goldsmith, A. R.

    Amphibians, like other vertebrates, respond to acute stressors by releasing glucocorticoid steroid hormones that mediate physiological and behavioural responses to stress. Measurement of stress hormones provides a potential means to improve the welfare of laboratory animals. For example,...

  15. Factors affecting faecal glucocorticoid levels in domestic cats (Felis catus): a pilot study with single and large multi-cat households

    Contributor(s):: Ramos, D., Arena, M. N., Reche-Junior, A., Daniel, A. G. T., Albino, M. V. C., Vasconcellos, A. S., Viau, P., Oliveira, C. A.

  16. Faecal glucocorticoid level is not correlated with stereotypic pacing in two captive margays ( Leopardus wiedii )

    Contributor(s):: Gusset, M.

    The 'coping hypothesis' of stereotypic behaviour - that stereotypies are performed as a means of helping the animal to cope with its environment by reducing stress - was tested using two adult female margays (Leopardus wiedii), an endangered neotropical small cat species. Within-individual and...

  17. Frustrated appetitive foraging behavior, stereotypic pacing, and fecal glucocorticoid levels in snow leopards ( Uncia uncia ) in the Zurich Zoo

    Contributor(s):: Burgener, N., Gusset, M., Schmid, H.

    This study hypothesized that permanently frustrated, appetitive-foraging behavior caused the stereotypic pacing regularly observed in captive carnivores. Using 2 adult female snow leopards (U), solitarily housed in the Zurich Zoo, the study tested this hypothesis experimentally with a novel...

  18. Influence of housing on weanling horse behaviour and subsequent welfare

    Contributor(s):: Heleski, C. R., Shelle, A. C., Nielsen, B. D., Zanella, A. J.

    Weaning foals marks a stressful event in horses' lives. Limited research exists regarding different housing methods post-weaning and the long-term implications on horse behaviour and welfare. The purpose of this study was to monitor behaviour and physiological stress markers in horses weaned...

  19. Influence of indoor-cat group size and dominance rank on urinary cortisol levels

    Contributor(s):: Lichtsteiner, M., Turner, D. C.

    Domestic cats (Felis silvestris catus) are often housed indoors both singly and in groups. However, there is a lack of studies dealing with cat-cat relationships, group composition and effects of environmental parameters on the well-being of privately-owned cats. One way to index the effects of...

  20. Monitoring stress hormone metabolites as a useful, non-invasive tool for welfare assessment in farm animals

    Contributor(s):: Palme, R.