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You are here: Home / Tags / Glucocorticoids + Stress / All Categories

Tags: Glucocorticoids + Stress

All Categories (1-20 of 49)

  1. Acute effects of cow-calf separation on heart rate, plasma cortisol and behaviour in multiparous dairy cows

    Contributor(s):: Hopster, H., O'Connell, J. M., Blokhuis, H. J.

    Removing the calf after bonding may induce acute stress in the dairy cow. The responses of 8 Holstein-Friesian cows were examined immediately after the removal of their calves on the third day after parturition. Blood samples were taken before and after the separation for cortisol analysis. After...

  2. An evaluation of the contribution of isolation, up-ending and wool removal to the stress response to shearing

    Contributor(s):: Hargreaves, A. L., Hutson, G. D.

    A 2x2x2 factorial experiment examined the effects of 3 components of shearing (isolation, up-ending and wool removal) on the development of a stress response to handling. 10 Merino wethers were allocated to each treatment. Haematocrit, plasma cortisol and plasma glucose were measured in a series...

  3. Behavioral and physiological correlates of stress in laboratory cats

    Contributor(s):: Carlstead, K., Brown, J. L., Strawn, W.

    Sixteen domestic cats were used to investigate the pituitary-adrenal, pituitary-gonadal and behavioural consequences of an unpredictable handling and husbandry routine. After a 10-day baseline period of standard laboratory procedures, 8 cats ('stressed cats', STR) were subjected to a 21-day...

  4. Behavioural and adrenocortical coping strategies and the effect on eosinophil leucocyte level and heterophil/lymphocyte-ratio in beech marten ( Martes foina )

    Contributor(s):: Hansen, S. W., Damgaard, B. M.

  5. Behavioural and hormonal responses to acute surgical stress in sheep

    Contributor(s):: Fell, L. R., Shutt, D. A.

    A combination of plasma cortisol and beta -endorphin measurement, behavioural observation and estimation of aversion to humans (by an arena test) was used to assess the response to the modified mules operation in 6- to 7-month-old Merino wethers. The operation involves the surgical removal of...

  6. Can non-invasive glucocorticoid measures be used as reliable indicators of stress in animals?

    Contributor(s):: Lane, J.

  7. Diurnal and individual variation in behaviour of restricted-fed broiler breeders

    Contributor(s):: Kostal, L., Savory, C. J., Hughes, B. O.

  8. Effect of Cage Type on Fecal Corticosterone Concentration in Buck Rabbits During the Reproductive Cycle

    Contributor(s):: Cornale, Paolo, Macchi, Elisabetta, Renna, Manuela, Prola, Liviana, Perona, Giovanni, Mimosi, Antonio

    Fecal corticosterone concentration (FCC) was measured in 14 buck rabbits individually housed in standard-dimension cages (SC) or in bigger cages (BC; with a volume more than double that of SC and equipped with a plastic foot mat) during 4 consecutive reproductive cycles. Cage type and...

  9. Effect of differential rearing on the behavioral and adrenocortical response of lambs to a novel environment

    Contributor(s):: Moberg, G. P., Wood, V. A.

    When lambs (14 days old) were placed in an open space, those reared in isolation were more withdrawn (were slow to begin moving, vocalized infrequently and avoided new objects) than lambs reared with dams or with other lambs. The difference in response was less pronounced when all lambs were...

  10. Effect of group housing and oral corticosterone administration on weight gain and locomotor development in neonatal rats

    Contributor(s):: Young, L. A., Pavlovska-Teglia, G., Stodulski, G., Hau, J.

  11. Effects of chronic stress on some blood parameters in the pig

    Contributor(s):: Barnett, J. L., Hemsworth, P. H., Hand, A. M.

    Plasma samples from juvenile female pigs exhibiting a chronic stress response, evidenced by higher free corticosteroid concentrations, changes in behaviour and reduced growth rates, were analysed for plasma concentrations of total protein, albumin, glucose, urea and cholesterol. Chronic stress...

  12. Effects of enrichment and housing on cortisol response in juvenile rhesus monkeys

    Contributor(s):: Schapiro, S. J., Bloomsmith, M. A., Kessel, A. L., Shively, C. A.

  13. Effects of freeze or hot-iron branding of Angus calves on some physiological and behavioural indicators of stress

    Contributor(s):: Lay, D. C., Friend, T. H., Grissom, K. K., Bowers, C. L., Mal, M. E.

    Twenty-four Angus calves averaging 293 +or- 38 kg either hot-iron branded (H), freeze branded (F), or served as a sham (S). Calves were grouped for temperament, weight, and sex, and randomly assigned to day and order in which treatments were applied. To reduce stress from handling at treatment...

  14. Effects of social environment on welfare status and sexual behaviour of female pigs. I. Effects of group size

    Contributor(s):: Barnett, J. L., Hemsworth, P. H., Winfield, C. G., Hansen, C.

    The study examined the effects of housing 24 adult female pigs in groups of 2, 4 or 8 with a space allowance of 1.4msuperscript 2 per pig on welfare status, as indicated by plasma free-corticosteroid concentrations and behaviour patterns, and sexual behaviour. Housing gilts in pairs resulted in...

  15. Effects of social environment on welfare status and sexual behaviour of female pigs. II. Effects of space allowance

    Contributor(s):: Hemsworth, P. H., Barnett, J. L., Hansen, C., Winfield, C. G.

    This study examined the effects of housing groups of adult female pigs (6 pigs per group) with a space allowance of 1, 2 or 3 msuperscript 2 per pig on sexual behaviour and welfare status, determined by plasma free-corticosteroid concentrations. A lower percentage of gilts was detected in oestrus...

  16. Effects of visual contact with zoo visitors on black-capped capuchin welfare

    Contributor(s):: Sherwen, S. L., Harvey, T. J., Magrath, M. J. L., Butler, K. L., Fanson, K. V., Hemsworth, P. H.

    Previous research has suggested that the presence of zoo visitors may be stressful for various primate species, and visual contact with visitors may be the sensory stimuli that mediate visitor effects. We studied a group of black-capped capuchins, Cebus apella, in a controlled experiment,...

  17. Effects of vitamin C supplementation on the adrenocortical and tonic immobility fear reactions of Japanese quail genetically selected for high corticosterone response to stress

    Contributor(s):: Satterlee, D. G., Jones, R. B., Ryder, F. H.

    Japanese quail chicks (18 days of age), from a line genetically selected for high plasma corticosterone response to brief immobilization stress, were treated for 24 h with either untreated drinking water or with a vitamin C (1200 mg/l of ascorbic acid: AA) solution. The chicks were subsequently...

  18. Environmental enrichment exerts anxiolytic effects in the Indian field mouse ( Mus booduga)

    Contributor(s):: Varman, D. R., Ganapathy, Marimuthu, Rajan, K. E.

  19. Environmentally enriching American mink ( Neovison vison) increases lymphoid organ weight and skeletal symmetry, and reveals differences between two sub-types of stereotypic behaviour

    Contributor(s):: Diez-Leon, M., Bursian, S., Galicia, D., Napolitano, A., Palme, R., Mason, G.

    Enrichment studies for wild carnivores (e.g., in zoos) are often short-term, use enrichments of unknown motivational significance, and focus on glucocorticoids and stereotypic behaviour (SB), ignoring other stress-relevant variables. Our study assessed the broad behavioural and physiological...

  20. Euthanasia methods, corticosterone and haematocrit levels in Xenopus laevis : evidence for differences in stress?

    Contributor(s):: Archard, G. A., Goldsmith, A. R.

    Amphibians, like other vertebrates, respond to acute stressors by releasing glucocorticoid steroid hormones that mediate physiological and behavioural responses to stress. Measurement of stress hormones provides a potential means to improve the welfare of laboratory animals. For example,...