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Tags: Hair + Animal behavior

Resources (1-13 of 13)

  1. Identification and development of measures suitable as potential breeding traits regarding dairy cows' reactivity towards humans

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Ebinghaus, A., Ivemeyer, S., Rupp, J., Knierim, U.

    Behavioural indicators of the human-animal relationship (HAR) are predominantly used in animal welfare science. However, the reactivity of dairy cows - as part of the HAR - is also of interest in the context of dairy breeding, due to its estimated moderate heritability. The avoidance distance...

  2. The relationship between individual behavioural styles, dominance rank and cortisol levels of cats living in urban social groups

    | Contributor(s):: Finkler, H., Terkel, J.

    Individual animals show differences in temperament, often correlated with ecologically important behavioural patterns such as dominance, and with physiological responses to environmental perturbations, such as cortisol levels. Identifying these temperaments in animals may reveal adaptive patterns...

  3. Hair plucking in captive bonobos ( Pan paniscus)

    | Contributor(s):: Brand, C. M., Marchant, L. F.

    Both wild and captive studies of grooming in non-human primates emphasize the adaptive role of this behavior. Indeed, social grooming is frequently characterized as "social glue" in the life of primates. Grooming behavior is studied to reveal dominance, kin relations, and social networks. Many...

  4. Assessing the prevalence and characteristics of hair-plucking behaviour in captive western lowland gorillas ( Gorilla gorilla gorilla)

    | Contributor(s):: Less, E. H., Kuhar, C. W., Lukas, K. E.

  5. Using stable isotope analysis to quantify anthropogenic foraging in black bears

    | Contributor(s):: Merkle, J. A., Derbridge, J. J., Krausman, P. R.

  6. A note on hair whorl position and cattle temperament in the auction ring

    | Contributor(s):: Lanier, J. L., Grandin, T., Green, R., Avery, D., McGee, K.

    The objective of this study was to further describe the relationships between facial hair whorls and temperament in cattle. Cattle (n=1636) from 6 commercial cattle auctions in Colorado and Texas, USA [date not given] were observed. Whorl location was classified according to lateral position...

  7. The relationships between temperament during routine handling tasks, weight gain and facial hair whorl position in frequently handled beef cattle

    | Contributor(s):: Olmos, G., Turner, S. P.

    A relationship has been described between facial hair whorl position and temperament in infrequently handled beef cattle when both traits were measured on categorical scales. Hair whorl position has also been found to relate to daily weight gain in dairy heifers. Using both a categorical scale...

  8. The propensity of cattle to vocalise during handling and isolation is affected by phenotype

    | Contributor(s):: Watts, J. M., Stookey, J. M.

    We investigated whether phenotype affects vocal and behavioural responses of newly-weaned beef calves during handling situations, and whether vocal response differs between two types of handling situation. The phenotypic characteristic chosen was hair colour. Steers were classified into four...

  9. Feather damaging behaviour in parrots: a review with consideration of comparative aspects

    | Contributor(s):: Zeeland, Y. R. A. van, Spruit, B. M., Rodenburg, T. B., Riedstra, B., Hierden, Y. M. van, Buitenhuis, B., Korte, S. M., Lumeij, J. T.

    Feather damaging behaviour (also referred to as feather picking or feather plucking) is a behavioural disorder that is frequently encountered in captive parrots. This disorder has many characteristics that are similar to trichotillomania, an impulse control disorder in humans. Unfortunately, to...

  10. Factors influencing hair loss among female captive rhesus macaques ( Macaca mulatta )

    | Contributor(s):: Beisner, B. A., Isbell, L. A.

    Although rare among wild animals, hair loss is common among captive animals, which suggests that some aspect of the captive environment contributes to abnormal hair loss. Female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) at the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC) housed in outdoor...

  11. Facial hair whorl position and temperament in cattle

    | Contributor(s):: Randle, H. D.

    57 Bos taurus cattle were scored on 19 measures of personality, 14 of which related to temperament. Measures included response to a novel object, cognitive problem solving ability and response to a familiar human, an unfamiliar man and men in general. Individual animals were classed as having a...

  12. Cattle with hair whorl patterns above the eyes are more behaviorally agitated during restraint

    | Contributor(s):: Grandin, T., Deesing, M. J., Struthers, J. J., Swinker, A. M.

    1500 cattle weighing 180-360 kg were temperament rated on a 4-point scale to determine whether hair whorl position on the forehead is related to a calm temperament. 72% of the cattle were European x British breed crosses and 28% were zebu x dairy breed crosses from Mexico. Cattle with a round...

  13. A note on behaviour and heart rate in horses differing in facial hair whorl

    | Contributor(s):: Gorecka, A., Golonka, M., Chruszczewski, M., Jezierski, T.

    The relationship between facial hair whorl position and reactivity, as assessed by behavioural measures (handling score=HS; startle reaction to a suddenly appearing novel object=SR; latency to touch a novel object=LNO) and heart rate measures (mean HR; increase in heart rate=IHR) were studied...