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  1. A Survey of Rabbit Handling Methods Within the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland

    Contributor(s):: Oxley, James Andrew, Ellis, Clare Frances, McBride, E. Anne, McCormick, Wanda Denise

    Rabbits are commonly kept in a variety of settings, including homes, laboratories, and veterinary clinics. Despite the popularity of keeping this prey species, little research has investigated current methods of handling. The aim of this study was to examine the experience of caregivers (owners...

  2. Rat Tickling in Pet Stores: Effects on Employees, Customers, and New Owners

    Contributor(s):: LaFollette, Megan R., Cloutier, Sylvie, Gaskill, Brianna N., O’Haire, Marguerite E.

    Rat tickling is a technique used by humans with rats to mimic rough-and-tumble play, improve welfare, and reduce fear. Anecdotal information suggests that rat tickling is also beneficial for humans, yet this assertion has not been empirically validated. We hypothesized that rat tickling would be...

  3. Playful handling as social enrichment for individually- and group-housed laboratory rats

    Contributor(s):: Cloutier, Sylvie, Baker, Chelsea, Wahl, Kim, Panksepp, Jaak, Newberry, Ruth C.

    Social housing is recommended for laboratory rats because they are highly social mammals but research constraints or medical issues often demand individual housing and, when social housing is practiced, it typically involves housing with only one or two conspecifics. We hypothesized that playful...

  4. Influence of gentle touching applied few weeks before slaughter on avoidance distance and slaughter stress in finishing cattle

    Contributor(s):: Probst, Johanna K., Hillmann, Edna, Leiber, Florian, Kreuzer, Michael, Spengler Neff, Anet

    The present study investigated the effect of gentle touching applied during the last 5 weeks before slaughter in finishing cattle on behaviour towards humans, stress indicators and beef quality. Three experiments were carried out. Experiments 1, 2 and 3 employed eight Limousin crossbred bulls,...

  5. Are special feed and being brushed judged as positive by calves?

    Contributor(s):: Westerath, H. Schulze, Gygax, L., Hillmann, E.

    In studies concerning animal welfare, especially on methods to enhance positive welfare, different stimuli are used to create positive situations or “rewards”. A positive judgement by the animals, however, cannot be assumed a priori. The aim of this study was to determine by means of preference...

  6. The influence of handling and exposure to a ferret on body temperature and running wheel activity of golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus)

    Contributor(s):: Eberli, Patrizia, Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G., Steiger, Andreas

    In order to determine a stress response, two groups of twenty male golden hamsters were either exposed to a ferret or handled by a human. The hamsters’ body temperature and running wheel activity were measured as stress correlates. Half of the hamsters’ cages were equipped with a functional...

  7. Identifying potential risk situations for humans when removing horses from groups

    Contributor(s):: Hartmann, Elke, Søndergaard, Eva, Keeling, Linda J.

    Removing a horse from its social group may be considered risky, both for the handler and the horse, because other horses can interfere in the catching process. The main aim of this study was to identify where and when these risk situations occur while removing a horse from its group. A potential...

  8. Human–animal interactions at abattoirs: Relationships between handling and animal stress in sheep and cattle

    Contributor(s):: Hemsworth, Paul H., Rice, Maxine, Karlen, Marcus G., Calleja, Lisa, Barnett, John L., Nash, Judy, Coleman, Grahame J.

    Relationships between handling and animal stress were studied in 200 animals, of similar age from one property, at each of two sheep and two cattle abattoirs (n=800). A total of 14 and 13 stockpeople handled the study sheep and cattle, respectively. At each abattoir, 10 cohorts of 20 animals from...

  9. Effect of marginal environmental and social enrichment during rearing on pigs’ reactions to novelty, conspecifics and handling

    Contributor(s):: Tönepöhl, Björn, Appel, Anne K., Welp, Stephan, Voß, Barbara, König von Borstel, Uta, Gauly, Matthias

    The rearing environment of farmed animals can affect their behaviour when handled, and therefore needs to be taken into account when selecting for traits such as docility. Therefore, 126 German Landrace and Pietrain×German Landrace pigs were reared in two different production environments (barren...

  10. Behavioural and physiological responses of captive wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons) to regular handling by humans

    Contributor(s):: Hogan, Lindsay A., Johnston, Stephen D., Lisle, Allan T., Keeley, Tamara, Wong, Phoenix, Nicolson, Vere, Horsup, Alan B., Janssen, Tina, Phillips, Clive J. C.

    The response of animals to handling by humans has been extensively evaluated in domesticated livestock, but rarely examined in wildlife species. Twelve captive wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons) were subjected to two treatments in a replicated design: (1) daily handling, involving 15min of tactile...

  11. Animal handling and stress-related behaviour at mobile slaughter of cattle

    Contributor(s):: Hultgren, J., Arvidsson Segerkvist, K., Berg, C., Karlsson, A. H., Algers, B.

    By avoiding animal transportation, mobile slaughter may have the potential to reduce animal stress. In a cross-sectional study with elements of cohort design, we investigated relationships between animal handling and stress-related animal behaviours in connection with slaughter at two Swedish...

  12. BOARD-INVITED REVEIW: Animal welfare in the U.S. slaughter industry- A focus on fed cattle

    Contributor(s):: Edwards-Callaway, L. N., Calvo-Lorenzo, M. S.

  13. Broadcasting human voice to piglets (sus scrofa domestica) modifies their behavioural reaction to human presence in the home pen and in arena tests

    Contributor(s):: Bensoussan, Sandy, Tigeot, Raphaëlle, Meunier-Salaün, Marie-Christine, Tallet, Céline

  14. Fearful Fido: Investigating dog experience in the veterinary context in an effort to reduce distress

    Contributor(s):: Edwards, Petra T., Smith, Bradley P., McArthur, Michelle L., Hazel, Susan J.

    For many dogs, receiving veterinary care can be a stressful, fearful or traumatic experience. However, understanding and improving the veterinary experience for dogs is challenging due to the dynamic nature of the veterinary visit, the number of stakeholders involved (veterinarian, guardian and...

  15. Temperamental cattle acclimate more substantially to repeated handling

    Contributor(s):: Parham, Jamie T., Tanner, Amy E., Barkley, Katharine, Pullen, Lyla, Wahlberg, Mark L., Swecker, William S., Lewis, Ronald M.

    Temperament of cattle impacts efficiency of production systems, including animal well-being. In being heritable, temperament can be augmented through selection. Current methods to evaluate temperament in a production setting include chute score (CS), exit score (ES), and exit velocity (EV), which...

  16. Testing two behavioural paradigms for measuring post-handling cat aversion behaviour

    Contributor(s):: Moody, Carly M., Mason, Georgia J., Dewey, Cate E., Landsberg, Gary M., Niel, Lee

    Owned, shelter, and laboratory cats undergo handling and restraint throughout their lifetime for routine health examinations and necessary procedures. Many cats display fear and aggressive behaviour during health examinations, and there is potential for these behaviours to result in incomplete...

  17. Faecal cortisol metabolites as an indicator of adrenocortical activity in farmed silver foxes (Vulpes vulpes)

    Contributor(s):: Hovland, Anne Lene, Rød, Anne Marit S., Eriksen, Marit Skog, Palme, Rupert, Nordgreen, Janicke, Mason, Georgia J.

    Measuring glucocorticoid metabolites in faeces has proven a useful, non-invasive method to monitor adrenocortical activity in several farm and wild species. Unlike plasma cortisol, whose sampling requires restraint and blood draws, faecal cortisol metabolites (FCM) may be particularly suitable...

  18. Does enrichment improve reptile welfare? Leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) respond to five types of environmental enrichment

    Contributor(s):: Bashaw, Meredith J., Gibson, Mallory D., Schowe, Devan M., Kucher, Abigail S.

    Animal welfare is a high priority for pet owners and accredited zoos and aquariums. Current approaches to measuring welfare focus on identifying consensus among behavioral and physiological indicators of positive and negative emotions. Environmental enrichment is a common strategy used to improve...

  19. Nest building as an indicator of illness in laboratory mice

    Contributor(s):: Gaskill, Brianna N., Pritchett-Corning, Kathleen R.

    Laboratory mice housed at typical temperatures and provided with crinkled paper nesting material build fully enclosed nests, increasing welfare, and reducing cold stress, but complicating daily animal observations by care staff. Anecdotal reports by animal care staff indicate that ill mice are...

  20. Effects of the method of restraint for shearing on behaviour and heart rate variability in alpacas

    Contributor(s):: Waiblinger, Susanne, Hajek, Franziska, Lambacher, Bianca, Wittek, Thomas

    Alpacas are increasingly kept in Europe for different purposes including fibre production. Yearly shearing is necessary to harvest fibre and for welfare reasons. Different methods of restraint are used during shearing, which may affect the welfare of the animals differently. The aim of the study...