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  1. A pilot study on yearlings' reactions to handling in relation to the training method

    Contributor(s):: Polito, R., Minero, M., Canali, E., Verga, M.

    Handling and training methods of horses, which specially emphasize the importance of understanding horse body language and the use of reinforcements, are often used in practice, yet their effects are not completely known. This study investigated whether the use of a sympathetic approach during...

  2. Comparison of the short-term effects of horse trekking and exercising with a riding simulator on autonomic nervous activity

    Contributor(s):: Matsuura, A., Nagai, N., Funatsu, A., Irimajiri, M., Yamazaki, A., Hodate, K.

    The aim of this study was to determine whether sympathetic and/or parasympathetic nervous activities were altered after horse trekking (HT) and exercise with a riding simulator (RS). Changes in heart rate variability (HRV), salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) activity, and psychological states were...

  3. Effect of aquariums on electroconvulsive therapy patients

    Contributor(s):: Barker, S. B., Rasmussen, K. G., Best, A. M.

    This study investigated the effect of an aquarium on pretreatment anxiety, fear, frustration and depression in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) patients. 42 patients consecutively referred for ECT were rotated between rooms with and without aquaria. Self-reported measures of depression, anxiety,...

  4. Exploratory study of stress-buffering response patterns from interaction with a therapy dog

    Contributor(s):: Barker, S. B., Knisely, J. S., McCain, N. L., Schubert, C. M., Pandurangi, A. K.

    This exploratory study builds on existing research on the physiological stress response to human-animal interactions in a non-clinical sample of adult dog-owners interacting with their own or an unfamiliar therapy dog under similar conditions. Participants were therapy-dog owners (TDO group; n=5)...

  5. Pet therapy effects on oncological day hospital patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Orlandi, M., Trangeled, K., Mambrini, A., Tagliani, M., Ferrarini, A., Zanetti, L., Tartarini, R., Pacetti, P., Cantore, M.

    Background: Pet therapy is utilised to improve the quality of life of patients with chronic diseases. The impact of AAA (animal-assisted activities), a kind of pet therapy, on oncological patients submitted to chemotherapy was evaluated. Patients and Methods: Two groups of patients receiving...

  6. The effect of animal-assisted therapy on stress responses in hospitalized children

    | Contributor(s):: Tsai, ChiaChun, Friedmann, E., Thomas, S. A.

    Hospitalization is a major, stressful experience for children. The stress associated with children's hospitalization may lead to negative physiological and psychological sequelae. Pediatric healthcare professionals can develop interventions to decrease children's stress during hospitalization....

  7. A non-invasive system for remotely monitoring heart rate in free-ranging ungulates

    | Contributor(s):: Gedir, J. V.

    A new, external non-invasive telemetric heart rate (HR) monitoring system was evaluated on 8 wapiti (Cervus elaphus canadensis), yearlings in July and August 1996. The assembly consisted of a leather girth strap, onto which a HR transmitter and a customized carriage bolt electrode system were...

  8. A pilot study to assess whether high expansion CO2;-enriched foam is acceptable for on-farm emergency killing of poultry

    | Contributor(s):: Gerritzen, M. A., Sparrey, J.

    This pilot experiment was conducted to ascertain whether CO2-enriched high expansion foam could be an acceptable and efficient alternative in emergency killing of poultry. This method could have wide-ranging applications but with particular emphasis on small (backyard) flocks, free-range sheds or...

  9. Animals' emotions: studies in sheep using appraisal theories

    | Contributor(s):: Veissier, I., Boissy, A., Desire, L., Greiveldinger, L.

    Animal welfare concerns stem from recognition of the fact that animals can experience emotions such as pain or joy. Nevertheless, discussion of animal emotions is often considered anthropomorphic, and there is a clear need to use explanatory frameworks to understand animals' emotions. We borrowed...

  10. Effect of driver and driving style on the stress responses of pigs during a short journey by trailer

    | Contributor(s):: Peeters, E., Deprez, K., Beckers, F., Baerdemaeker, J. D., Aubert, A. E., Geers, R.

    The aim of this study was to investigate the combined effect of driver and driving style on the behaviour, salivary cortisol concentration, and heart-rate variability of pigs during a short journey. In addition, the effect of differing accelerations (longitudinal, lateral, and vertical) of the...

  11. Effect of human contact on heart rate of pigs

    | Contributor(s):: Geers, R., Janssens, G., Ville, H., Bleus, E., Gerard, H., Janssens, S., Jourquin, J.

    Pigs were selected at random from 3 lines (homozygous halothane positive, homozygous negative and the heterozygotes). They were housed for 4 weeks within standardized environmental conditions with 6 pigs per pen corresponding to each of the 3 lines with 2 treatment combinations (6x3x2). Half of...

  12. Effects of lighting on heart rate and positional preferences during confinement in farmed red deer

    | Contributor(s):: Pollard, J. C., Littlejohn, R. P.

    In the first of 2 experiments heart rate was measured in 24 individual deer, restrained in a mechanical deer crush for 2 min, under either dark (0 lux) or light (1500 lux) conditions. A stethoscope was used to monitor heartbeat. In experiment 2, 10 groups of 3 deer were confined for 4 min in an...

  13. Evaluating possible indicators of insensibility and death in cetacea

    | Contributor(s):: Butterworth, A., Sadler, L., Knowles, T. G., Kestin, S. C.

    The International Whaling Commission (IWC) currently uses imprecise indicators of death to evaluate the welfare consequences of whaling. A recent independent meeting of animal welfare scientists proposed a series of tests to determine the states of sensibility/insensibility/death of whales. As a...

  14. Head-only electrical stunning and bleeding of African catfish ( Clarias gariepinus ): assessment of loss of consciousness

    | Contributor(s):: Lambooij, E., Kloosterboer, R. J., Gerritzen, M. A., Vis, J. W. van de

    The objective was to evaluate the welfare implications of electrical stunning prior to gill-cutting of farmed African catfish as an alternative to live chilling in combination with gutting. Electroencephalogram (EEG) and electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings, in combination with observation of...

  15. Heart rate and stress hormone responses of sheep to road transport following two different loading procedures

    | Contributor(s):: Parrott, R. F., Hall, S. J. G., Lloyd, D. M.

    The physiological responses induced in 18 sheep by 2 different loading techniques followed by a short road journey were investigated. All animals were prepared with venous catheters, to minimize the disturbing effects of blood sampling, and 9 sheep were fitted with heart rate monitors. The...

  16. Influence of olfactory substances on the heart rate and lying behaviour of pigs during transport simulation

    | Contributor(s):: Driessen, B., Peeters, E., Geers, R.

    This study investigated the effect of olfactory substances on the heart rate and lying behaviour of pigs during transport simulation. Five treatments were tested through the application of each substance to pigs' snouts with a paintbrush. These consisted of: (1) control treatment (wiping without...

  17. Infrared thermography as a non-invasive tool to study animal welfare

    | Contributor(s):: Stewart, M., Webster, J. R., Schaefer, A. L., Cook, N. J., Scott, S. L.

    Growing public concern regarding animal welfare and consumer demand for humanely produced products have placed pressure on the meat, wool and dairy industries to improve and confirm the welfare status of their animals. This has increased the need for reliable methods of assessing animal welfare...

  18. Lack of evidence for stress being caused to pigs by witnessing the slaughter of conspecifics

    | Contributor(s):: Anil, M. H., McKinstry, J. L., Field, M., Rodway, R. G.

    15 catheterized pigs (Duroc x Large White) of mixed sex of between 35 and 65 kg body weight were allowed to see the stunning and sticking (exsanguination) of pigs in a nearby pen. Each witness pig was placed in a hammock giving it a full view of another pen in which 2 other pigs were put. One of...

  19. Telemetry as a method for measuring the impact of housing conditions on rats' welfare

    | Contributor(s):: Krohn, T. C., Hansen, A. K., Dragsted, N.

    Various tools have been developed over previous years to study the welfare of laboratory animals. These include preference tests, which are commonly used to evaluate housing environments. Preference tests, however, have some pitfalls. They supply information only on the animals' present...

  20. The effect of blindfolding horses on heart rate and behaviour during handling and loading onto transport vehicles

    | Contributor(s):: Parker, R., Watson, R., Wells, E., Brown, S. N., Nicol, C. J., Knowles, T. G.

    Blindfolding is routinely used to aid the handling and loading of horses that are difficult to control. Fifteen relatively well-behaved horses of varying ages and disciplines were used to investigate the effects of blinkering and blindfolding on behaviour and heart rate in three situations:...