The HABRI Foundation is calling for research proposals to investigate the health outcomes of pet ownership and/or animal-assisted activity or therapy, both for the people and the animals involved. To learn more, visit https://habri.org/grants/funding-opportunities/ close

 
You are here: Home / Tags / Hens / All Categories

Tags: Hens

All Categories (1-20 of 157)

  1. Assessment of Plumage and Integument Condition in Dual-Purpose Breeds and Conventional Layers

    Contributor(s):: Mona Franziska Giersberg, Birgit Spindler

    The assessment of plumage and integument condition in laying hens provides useful information about the occurrence of feather pecking and cannibalism. Although feather loss and skin injuries can result from mechanical abrasion or clinical diseases, they are valid animal-based indicators for...

  2. Social networks and welfare in future animal management

    Contributor(s):: Koene, P., Ipema, B.

    It may become advantageous to keep human-managed animals in the social network groups to which they have adapted. Data concerning the social networks of farm animal species and their ancestors are scarce but essential to establishing the importance of a natural social network for farmed animal...

  3. Farmer attitudes to injurious pecking in laying hens and to potential control strategies

    Contributor(s):: Palczynski, L. J., Buller, H., Lambton, S. L., Weeks, C. A.

    Farmers' recognition of health and welfare problems, and their responses to related intervention programmes, such as those to reduce injurious pecking in hens, directly influence the welfare of animals in their care. Changing those responses can be achieved through a re-positioning of social...

  4. Tree cover and injurious feather-pecking in commercial flocks of free-range laying hens: a follow up

    Contributor(s):: Bright, A., Gill, R., Willings, T. H.

    Injurious feather-pecking in non-cage systems is a serious economic and welfare concern for the egg-producing industry. This study presents results from data of over 1,000 flocks from producers who supplied free-range eggs to McDonald's Restaurants Ltd UK between 2008 and 2013. These producers...

  5. Consumer attitudes to injurious pecking in free-range egg production

    Contributor(s):: Bennett, R. M., Jones, P. J., Nicol, C. J., Tranter, R. B., Weeks, C. A.

    Free-range egg producers face continuing problems from injurious pecking (IP) which has financial consequences for farmers and poor welfare implications for birds. Beak-trimming has been practised for many years to limit the damage caused by IP, but with the UK Government giving notification that...

  6. Dustbathing, pecking and scratching behaviours of laying hens in furnished cages are enhanced by the presence of rubber mats and litter distribution

    Contributor(s):: Guinebretiere, M., Michel, V., Arnould, C.

    Furnished cages for laying hens exist in a wide variety of sizes and designs and should be equipped to allow hens to express some of their behavioural priorities. European Council Directive 1999/74/EC stipulates that litter must be provided for pecking and scratching but the type of litter and...

  7. Effects of maternal vocalisations on the domestic chick stress response

    Contributor(s):: Edgar, J., Kelland, I., Held, S., Paul, E., Nicol, C.

    Although natural brooding is not commercially feasible, there is great potential to simulate aspects of maternal care to improve the welfare of farmed domestic chicks. Our previous studies showed that the presence of calm broody hens can buffer mild stress responses in chicks, although the...

  8. Effects of variation in nest curtain design on pre-laying behaviour of domestic hens

    Contributor(s):: Ringgenberg, N., Frohlich, E. K. F., Harlander-Matauschek, A., Toscano, M. J., Wurbel, H., Roth, B. A.

    Laying hens in loose-housing systems select a nest daily in which to lay their eggs among many identical looking nests, they often prefer corner nests. We investigated whether heterogeneity in nest curtain appearance - via colours and symbols - would influence nest selection and result in an even...

  9. Slow and steady wins the race? No signs of reduced welfare in smaller broiler breeder hens at four weeks of age

    Contributor(s):: Lindholm, C., Calais, A., Jonsson, J., Yngwe, N., Berndtson, E., Hult, E., Altimiras, J.

    Broiler breeder chickens are commonly reared under strict feed-restriction regimes to reduce obesity-induced health and fertility problems during adult life, and are assumed to experience a reduced welfare due to the resulting hunger. In these conditions, feed competition could influence the...

  10. The Squawk about Hen-Keeping in Elderly Care Facilities: An Interview with Douglas Hunter

    14 Dec 2015 | Posted by Katie Carroll

    For many centuries, people living in rural areas and on farms have kept laying hens either as a way to get fresh eggs for their families or as a way to make a profit by selling the eggs.  More...

    https://habricentral.org/members/2412/blog/2015/12/the-squawk-about-hen-keeping-in-elderly-care-facilities-an-interview-with-douglas-hunter

  11. Dustbathing behavior: do ectoparasites matter?

    Contributor(s):: Vezzoli, G., Mullens, B. A., Mench, J. A.

    A presumed function of dustbathing behavior is to remove ectoparasites. Providing dustbathing substrates in furnished cages for laying hens might therefore offer an alternative to pesticide use to reduce ectoparasite populations. We investigated the effectiveness of dustbathing substrates for...

  12. Effects of different dietary protein levels during rearing and different dietary energy levels during lay on behaviour and feather cover in broiler breeder females

    Contributor(s):: Emous, R. A. van, Kwakkel, R., Krimpen, M. van, Hendriks, W.

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of different dietary protein levels during rearing and different dietary energy levels during lay on behaviour and feather cover in broiler breeder females. A 2*3*2 factorial arrangement of treatments was used. A total of 2880 Ross 308...

  13. Nest choice in laying hens: effects of nest partitions and social status

    Contributor(s):: Ringgenberg, N., Frohlich, E. K. F., Harlander-Matauschek, A., Toscano, M. J., Wurbel, H., Roth, B. A.

    Nest choice in loose-housed laying hens is influenced by nest characteristics, position and social factors. We examined the relative preference of laying hens for two group-nests differing in the presence or absence of a partition in the middle of the nest and whether this was influenced by...

  14. Perseveration in a guessing task by laying hens selected for high or low levels of feather pecking does not support classification of feather pecking as a stereotypy

    Contributor(s):: Kjaer, J. B., Wurbel, H., Schrader, L.

    Feather pecking is a behaviour by which birds damage or destroy the feathers of themselves (self-pecking) or other birds (allo feather pecking), in some cases even plucking out feathers and eating these. The self-pecking is rarely seen in domestic laying hens but is not uncommon in parrots....

  15. Modification of aviary design reduces incidence of falls, collisions and keel bone damage in laying hens

    Contributor(s):: Stratmann, A., Frohlich, E. K. F., Gebhardt-Henrich, S. G., Harlander-Matauschek, A., Wurbel, H., Toscano, M. J.

    Non-cage housing systems for laying hens such as aviaries provide greater freedom to perform species-specific behavior and thus are thought to improve welfare of the birds; however, aviaries are associated with a high prevalence of keel bone damage (fractures and deviations), which is a major...

  16. Acute stress enhances sensitivity to a highly attractive food reward without affecting judgement bias in laying hens

    Contributor(s):: Hernandez, C. E., Hinch, G., Lea, J., Ferguson, D., Lee, C.

    Affective states can be evaluated by assessing shifts in the animal's expectation of a positive and negative outcome in response to ambiguous cues, also known as judgement bias (JB). The aim of this study was to use a JB methodology, using a go/go type of task where animals are required to make...

  17. Development of early foraging behaviour of domestic chicks in varying social contexts

    Contributor(s):: Gajdon, G. K., Mundwiler, B., Stauffacher, M.

    Two aspects of foraging development might be crucial to learning in precocial chicks: what food particles look like and what food sites look like. Previous research indicates that there are innate dispositions for particle preferences and for preferring the type of food sites experienced between...

  18. Evidence of competition for nest sites by laying hens in large furnished cages

    Contributor(s):: Hunniford, M. E., Torrey, S., Bedecarrats, G., Duncan, I. J. H., Widowski, T. M.

    Furnished cages are designed to accommodate behaviour considered important to laying hens, particularly nesting behaviour. Few researchers have studied the degree of competition for nest sites or the extent to which the amount of nest space affects nesting behaviour in large furnished cages. We...

  19. Plumage damage in free-range laying hens: behavioural characteristics in the rearing period and the effects of environmental enrichment and beak-trimming

    Contributor(s):: Hartcher, K. M., Tran, M. K. T. N., Wilkinson, S. J., Hemsworth, P. H., Thomson, P. C., Cronin, G. M.

    Severe feather-pecking, whereby birds peck at and pull out the feathers of other birds, is one of the greatest welfare concerns and the most prevalent behavioural problem in laying hens. It can be extremely difficult to control, especially in non-cage laying flocks. Despite a multitude of studies...

  20. The relevance of variations in group size and phenotypic appearance on the behaviour and movement patterns of young domestic fowl

    Contributor(s):: Liste, G., Campderrich, I., Beltran Heredia, I. de, Estevez, I.

    Variations in the group size of laying hens might increase the risk of undesired behaviours with important consequences for the birds' health and welfare. However, larger groups housed at constant densities also translate into larger enclosures that may increase space efficiency, therefore...