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  1. Human-Black Bear Conflicts

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Carl W. Lackey, Stewart W. Breck, Brian F. Wakeling, Bryant White

    Most human–black bear (Ursus americanus) conflict occurs when people make anthropogenic foods like garbage, dog food, domestic poultry, or fruit trees available to bears. Bears change their behavior to take advantage of these resources and may damage property or cause public safety...

  2. Evaluating lethal and nonlethal management options for urban coyotes

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Stewart W. Breck, Sharon A. Poessel, Mary Ann Bonnell

    Human–coyote (Canis latrans) conflict in urban environments is a growing issue in cities throughout the United States, with the primary problem being the development of problem individuals that are overly bold and aggressive with people and pets. Little research has focused on management...

  3. Human–Black Bear Conflicts: A Review of Common Management Practices

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Carl W. Lackey, Stewart W. Breck, Brian F. Wakeling, Bryant White

    The objective of this monograph is to provide wildlife professionals, who respond to human–bear conflicts, with an appraisal of the most common techniques used for mitigating conflicts as well as the benefits and challenges of each technique in a single document. Most human–black...

  4. State Management of Human–Wildlife Conflicts

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Kurt C. VerCauteren, Daniel Hirchert, Scott Hygnstrom

    Many positive experiences are associated with wildlife, from passively watching animals in our backyards to actively hunting in publicly owned forests. Unfortunately, wildlife can be a double- edged sword. Human– wildlife conflicts are pervasive in society, and nearly all...

  5. Large Terrestrial Bird Adapting Behavior in an Urbanized Zone

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Eduardo R. Alexandrino, Juliano A. Bogoni, Ana B. Navarro, Alex A. A. Bovo, Rafael M. Gonçalves, Jacob D. Charters, Juan A. Domini, Katia M. P. M. B. Ferraz

    Wildlife living within urban ecosystems have to adapt or perish. Red-legged Seriema, a large terrestrial bird, are rare in urban ecosystems, however, they have been reported in a medium-sized Brazilian city. We investigated the reasons for this occurrence as well as their behavior. We assessed...

  6. An analysis of human–black bear conflict in Utah

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Julie Ann Miller, Tom S. Smith, Janene Auger, Hal Black, Loreen Allphin

    Conflict between black bears (Ursus americanus) and humans has occurred in Utah, but the records are largely incomplete. To document these events, the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources initiated a black bear sightings and encounters database in 2003, and we updated it. From 2003–2013,...

  7. Proceedings of the Seventeenth Wildlife Damage Management Conference, Orange Beach, AL, February 26-March 1, 2017

    Full-text: Available

    Proceedings full document

  8. An Overview of Increasing Incidents of Bottlenose Dolphin Harassment in the Gulf of Mexico and Possible Solutions

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Courtney S. Vail

    The panhandle region of the Gulf of Mexico is known by scientists, regulatory agencies and conservation organizations as a “hotbed” area of dolphin harassment. Interactions between humans and wild dolphins routinely occur through close vessel approaches or through direct contact...

  9. Impact of Wind Energy on Bats: a Summary of our Current Knowledge

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Cris D. Hein, Michael R. Schirmacher

    Since 2003, when it was discovered that large numbers of bats were being killed at wind turbines in the eastern United States, our understanding of the impact of wind energy development on bats has increased and consistent patterns of fatality, including seasonality and species composition have...

  10. Human-Bear Interactions Among Black Bears in Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah, and Polar Bears on Alaska's North Slope

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Wesley G. Larson

    Human-bear interactions are an important consideration of bear biology, as interactions can lead to destruction of property as well as injury or death for both human and bear. Successful analysis of why these interactions occur can lead to appropriate preventative measures and mitigation of...

  11. How bees can keep the peace between elephants and humans | Lucy King

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Lucy King

    Imagine waking in the middle of the night to an elephant ripping the roof from your house in search of food. This is a reality in some communities in Africa where, as wild spaces shrink, people and elephants are competing for space and resources like never before. In this engaging talk,...

  12. Human-wildlife conflict-causes, consequences and mitigation measures with special reference to Kashmir

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Aadil Habib, Ishfaq Nazir, Mustahson F. Fazili, Bilal A. Bhat

    The rising levels of man-animal conflicts at various locations of Kashmir valley in India are due to close proximity between humans and wild carnivores particularly leopard and black bear. The data regarding human injuries and mortalities caused during conflicts from 2010 to 2012 was collected...

  13. Environmental factors influencing the occurrence of coyotes and conflicts in urban areas

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sharon A. Poessel, Eric M. Gese, Julie K. Young

    The increase of global urbanization can have effects on wildlife species, including carnivores such as coyotes (Canis latrans). As coyotes continue to settle in more urban areas, reports of human-coyote conflicts, such as attacks on humans or pets, may also increase. Understanding environmental...

  14. Human development and climate affect hibernation in a large carnivore with implications for human–carnivore conflicts

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Heather E. Johnson, David L. Lewis, Tana L. Verzuh, Cody F. Wallace, Rebecca M. Much, Lyle K. Willmarth, Stewart W. Breck

    1. Expanding human development and climate change are dramatically altering habitat conditions for wildlife. While the initial response of wildlife to changing environmental conditions is typically a shift in behavior, little is known about the effects of these stressors on hibernation...

  15. Good fences make good neighbours: A qualitative, interpretive study of human–baboon and human–human conflict on the Cape Peninsula

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Renelle Terblanche

    Picturesque Cape Town is the epitome of an urban/nature interface but one within which chacma baboons (Papio ursinus) face slander for transgressing both the socially constructed human/animal and nature/culture divide, and/or the actual, physical borderlines associated with these divides. The...

  16. Human wildlife conflicts and interaction : the impact of oil exploration and development in Buliisa, Uganda

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Isaac Sserwanga

    After discovery of an estimated 2.5 billion of commercially viable oil, worth $2 billion in annual revenue for 20 years in the Albertine graben, Uganda’s pursuit for a middle state income status seemed attainable. However, the oil reserves are situated in biodiversity sensitive area, with...

  17. Where are the wild elephants supposed to go? | Paola Branco | TEDxUIdaho

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Paola Branco

    As amazing as it would be if they did, animals don’t help save animals. People do…or don’t. African elephants are one of many animals that need to be saved. However, human-elephant conflicts are known to have occurred for many, many years, all over the African...

  18. Human-carnivore conflict over livestock in the eastern Serengeti ecosystem with special emphasis on African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus)

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Richard Daniel Lyamuya

    Human-carnivore conflict is currently one of the main constraints to biodiversity conservation efforts outside many protected areas worldwide. A survey of livestock depredation caused by wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) and other wild carnivore species in the Maasai and Sonjo areas outside Serengeti...

  19. Badger-human conflict: an overlooked historical context for bovine TB debates in the UK

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Angela Cassidy

    In Britain, the question of whether to cull wild badgers (Meles meles) in order to control the spread of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in domestic cattle herds has been the source of scientific, public and policy controversy for over 40 years and still shows no sign of resolution. This chapter...

  20. Role of environmental education in addressing Human-Animal conflict in Zambia's game management area

    | Contributor(s):: Chimbwe Nyambe

    Human-animal conflict, particularly human-carnivore conflict, is a growing problem in today’s crowded world, and can have significant impacts on both human and wildlife populations. Despite the application of different management practices, both locally and globally, the problem still...