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  1. Keeping Lily Safe: An Autoethnographic Exploration of Human–Animal Attachment during Adversity

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Catherine Lee

    This article is an autoethnographic examination of my experiences as a pet owner during a particularly challenging time in my life. Beginning with a summary of a critical incident, it shows the way in which fears for the safety of my pet cat, Lily, and my relationship with her impacted my...

  2. Stakeholder Perceptions of the Challenges to Racehorse Welfare

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Deborah Butler, Mathilde Valenchon, Rachel Annan, Helen R. Whay, Siobhan Mullan

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight some of the key challenges to racehorse welfare as perceived by racing industry stakeholders. The paper draws upon statements and transcripts from 10 focus group discussions with 42 participants who were taking part in a larger study investigating...

  3. The State of Research on Human–Animal Relations: Implications for Human Health

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Deborah L. Wells

    Since the late 1970s, scientific evidence has accumulated showing that pet ownership can have positive effects on people’s physical and mental wellbeing. This paper reviews the current state of affairs regarding the relationship between companion animals and human health, focusing on both...

  4. A One Health Research Framework for Animal-Assisted Interventions

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Karin Hediger, Andrea Meisser, Jakob Zinsstag

    Background: The integration of animals into healthcare, referred to as animal-assisted intervention, is a rapidly growing research field and was previously related to One Health. However, the assessment of synergistic effects of animal-assisted interventions (AAI) has been poorly addressed to...

  5. A Comparison of Zoo Animal Behavior in the Presence of Familiar and Unfamiliar People

    | Contributor(s):: Martin, Rosemary Anne, Melfi, Vicky

    As recorded in domestic nonhuman animals, regular interactions between animals in zoos and keepers and the resulting relationship formed (human–animal relationship [HAR]) are likely to influence the animals' behaviors with associated welfare consequences. HAR formation requires that zoo animals...

  6. A Longitudinal Study of Decision Making in the Process of Acquiring a Dog

    | Contributor(s):: Vink, Lonneke M., Dijkstra, Arie, Epstude, Kai

    To prevent potential problems in the relationship between people and their dogs, it is important to engage in a thoughtful decision-making process with regard to acquiring a dog. To map the most important elements in the decision-making process, a social cognitive model was applied using seven...

  7. Psychological Mechanisms Predicting Wellbeing in Pet Owners: Rogers’ Core Conditions versus Bowlby’s Attachment

    | Contributor(s):: Teo, Jillian Terese, Thomas, Susan J.

    While pet ownership may confer physical and psychological health benefits, existing research presents inconsistent findings, and the psychological mechanisms through which health benefits might be conferred are unknown. Exploring human–pet relationships from the perspectives of Bowlby’s...

  8. Measuring the Strength of Human–Animal Bonds in Zoos

    | Contributor(s):: Hosey, Geoff, Birke, Lynda, Shaw, Wendy S., Melfi, Vicky

    Repeated interactions within individual human and animal dyads can lead to the establishment of human–animal relationships (HARs), which may vary in quality from good to bad, defined in terms of the positivity (e.g., friendly contact, play) or negativity (e.g., aggression) of the interactions on...

  9. The Effects of Touching and Stroking a Cat on the Inferior Frontal Gyrus in People

    | Contributor(s):: Kobayashi, Ai, Yamaguchi, Yusuke, Ohtani, Nobuyo, Ohta, Mitsuaki

    Our study evaluated the effects on the prefrontal cortex, especially the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), of people when touching and stroking a real or soft toy cat, using functional near infrared spectroscopy. Thirty under-graduate students (10 males, 20 females) were recruited and performed three...

  10. Children Love Their Pets: Do Relationships between Children and Pets Co-vary with Taxonomic Order, Gender, and Age?

    | Contributor(s):: Hirschenhauser, Katharina, Meichel, Yasmine, Schmalzer, Sabrina, Beetz, Andrea M.

    Generally, children love their pets. However, a deeper insight into the beneficial effects of pets on the physical, psychological, and social wellbeing and development of children is needed. This study investigated whether children have more intense relationships with animals which are...

  11. The Canine Cuteness Effect: Owner-Perceived Cuteness as a Predictor of Human–Dog Relationship Quality

    | Contributor(s):: Thorn, Pinar, Howell, Tiffani J., Brown, Cynthia, Bennett, Pauleen C.

    The modern domestic dog's primary function is as a human companion. A strong human–dog relationship may be beneficial to both parties but not all relationships are successful. There is currently no consensus on why some dog–owner relationships flourish and others fail, but relationship quality...

  12. Empathy-Related Ratings to Still Images of Human and Nonhuman Animal Groups in Negative Contexts Graded for Phylogenetic Similarity

    | Contributor(s):: Ingham, H. Rae Westbury, Neumann, David L., Waters, Allison M.

    Research using film stimuli has shown that the strength of empathy-related responses toward nonhuman animals is related to the amount of phylogenetic similarity of the animals to humans. The present study aimed to develop and validate a new set of still images depicting humans and nonhuman...

  13. Exploring Synchronicity in the Heart Rates of Familiar and Unfamiliar Pairs of Horses and Humans Undertaking an In-Hand Task

    | Contributor(s):: Hockenhull, Jo, Young, Tamsin J., Redgate, Sarah E., Birke, Lynda

    Physiological responses that occur in horses and humans during their interactions, on the ground and during ridden work, have been investigated in a number of studies with some conflicting results. These suggest that in some situations emotional state may be transferred from humans to horses and...

  14. Using qualitative behaviour assessment to explore the link between stockperson behaviour and dairy calf behaviour

    | Contributor(s):: Ellingsen, Kristian, Coleman, Grahame J., Lund, Vonne, Mejdell, Cecilie M.

    Dairy farming usually implies close and frequent contact between the stockperson and the animals. A good human–animal relationship (HAR) is therefore essential for good animal welfare. To fully understand the quality of the HAR both the stockperson behaviour and the animals’ reaction to the...

  15. Influence of gentle touching applied few weeks before slaughter on avoidance distance and slaughter stress in finishing cattle

    | Contributor(s):: Probst, Johanna K., Hillmann, Edna, Leiber, Florian, Kreuzer, Michael, Spengler Neff, Anet

    The present study investigated the effect of gentle touching applied during the last 5 weeks before slaughter in finishing cattle on behaviour towards humans, stress indicators and beef quality. Three experiments were carried out. Experiments 1, 2 and 3 employed eight Limousin crossbred bulls,...

  16. Individual and environmental factors associated with stereotypic behavior and fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels in zoo housed polar bears

    | Contributor(s):: Shepherdson, David, Lewis, Karen D., Carlstead, Kathy, Bauman, Joan, Perrin, Nancy

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are known to exhibit repetitive pacing behaviors, usually described as stereotypic, in zoo environments. However, little quantitative information exists about the prevalence of pacing in the zoo population. Similarly, large, multi-institutional studies conducted to...

  17. I like my dog, does my dog like me?

    | Contributor(s):: Rehn, Therese, Lindholm, Ulrika, Keeling, Linda, Forkman, Björn

    In this study, the possibility of there being an association between how an owner perceives his/her relationship to their dog and the way the dog experiences the relationship to its owner was investigated using two well-established methods within the anthrozoology literature. Twenty dog–owner...

  18. Effects of neonatal castration on social behaviour, human–animal relationship and feeding activity in finishing pigs reared in a conventional or an enriched housing

    | Contributor(s):: Tallet, Céline, Brilloüet, Armelle, Meunier-Salaün, Marie-Christine, Paulmier, Valérie, Guérin, Carole, Prunier, Armelle

    Raising entire males is already common in a few European countries. It has the advantage of avoiding the pain of castration. Entire males have also a better food conversion. However, they would be more aggressive than castrates which causes welfare troubles. The consequences for human–animal...

  19. Behavioral correlates and welfare implications of informal interactions between caretakers and zoo-housed chimpanzees and gorillas

    | Contributor(s):: Chelluri, Gita I., Ross, Stephen R., Wagner, Katherine E.

    In captive animal facilities, human staff members are a relevant part of the animals’ social environment in addition to providing care and managing the social group. Structured, predictable interactions and relaxed, spontaneous contacts may all affect the animals’ behavior and well-being, both...

  20. Approach behaviour of shelter dogs and its relationships with the attitudes of shelter staff to dogs

    | Contributor(s):: Arhant, Christine, Troxler, Josef

    The behaviour of animals towards humans is widely used to assess human–animal relationship and welfare in livestock. The aim of this study was to develop an approach test for dogs that is feasible in a surveillance setting, shows stability over a given time period and has good...