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  1. The State of Research on Human–Animal Relations: Implications for Human Health

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Deborah L. Wells

    Since the late 1970s, scientific evidence has accumulated showing that pet ownership can have positive effects on people’s physical and mental wellbeing. This paper reviews the current state of affairs regarding the relationship between companion animals and human health, focusing on both...

  2. The State of Research on Human–Animal Relations: Implications for Human Health

    | Contributor(s):: Wells, Deborah L.

    Since the late 1970s, scientific evidence has accumulated showing that pet ownership can have positive effects on people’s physical and mental wellbeing. This paper reviews the current state of affairs regarding the relationship between companion animals and human health, focusing on both the...

  3. Diversity of Anaplasma and Ehrlichia/Neoehrlichia Agents in Terrestrial Wild Carnivores Worldwide: Implications for Human and Domestic Animal Health and Wildlife Conservation

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Marcos Rogério André

    Recently, the incidence and awareness of tick-borne diseases in humans and animals have increased due to several factors, which in association favor the chances of contact among wild animals and their ectoparasites, domestic animals and humans. Wild and domestic carnivores are considered the...

  4. Look Before You Leap: What Are the Obstacles to Risk Calculation in the Equestrian Sport of Eventing?

    | Contributor(s):: Denzil O'Brien

    All horse-riding is risky. In competitive horse sports, eventing is considered the riskiest, and is often characterised as very dangerous. But based on what data? There has been considerable research on the risks and unwanted outcomes of horse-riding in general, and on particular subsets of...

  5. Healthy animals, healthy people: Inextricably linked

    | Contributor(s):: Michael B. Cates

    Dogs and dolphins, monkeys and cats, horses and mules, rabbits, rodents, reptiles, and humans--multiple species, and all are part of the focused mission of the US Army Veterinary Corps. For over 91 years, officers in our Corps, along with support personnel, have been an integral part of the Army...

  6. Does cat attachment have an effect on human health? A comparison between owners and volunteers

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Filipa Alexandra Benchimol da Silva Garcia Dinis, Thais Lima Fernandes Martins

    Cat owners and volunteers from a rehoming centre were given the Lexington Attachment to Pet Scale (LAPS) questionnaire to assess their level of attachment to their own or rescue cats. In addition, heart rate and blood pressure were measured 10 minutes before, during, and after spending time with...

  7. Bacterial Zoonoses Transmitted by Household Pets: State-of-the-Art and Future Perspectives for Targeted Research and Policy Actions

    | Contributor(s):: Damborg, P., Broens, E. M., Chomel, B. B., Guenther, S., Pasmans, F., Wagenaar, J. A., Weese, J. S., Wieler, L. H., Windahl, U., Vanrompay, D., Guardabassi, L.

  8. Evolution of research into the mutual benefits of human–animal interaction

    | Contributor(s):: Sandra McCune, Katherine A. Kruger, James A. Griffin, Layla Esposito, Lisa S. Freund, Karyl J. Hurley, Regina Bures

    There has been unprecedented development of research into human–animal interaction (HAI) in recent years, and this has produced rapid growth in our knowledge and understanding of the benefits that accrue from pet ownership. Recent evidence and developments in the field of HAI have improved...

  9. Ebola Virus Antibody Prevalence in Dogs and Human Risk

    | Contributor(s):: Lois Allela, Olivier Bourry, Andre Delicat, Philippe Yaba, Brice Kumulungui, Pierre Rouquet, Jean-Paul Gonzalez, Eric M. Leroy

    During the 2001–2002 outbreak in Gabon, we observed that several dogs were highly exposed to Ebola virus by eating infected dead animals. To examine whether these animals became infected with Ebola virus, we sampled 439 dogs and screened them by Ebola virus–specific immunoglobulin...

  10. Prioritizing Zoonoses: A Proposed One Health Tool for Collaborative Decision-Making

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Cassidy Logan Rist, Carmen Sofia Arriola, Carol Rubin

    Emerging and re-emerging zoonotic diseases pose a threat to both humans and animals. This common threat is an opportunity for human and animal health agencies to coordinate across sectors in a more effective response to zoonotic diseases. An initial step in the collaborative process is...

  11. Avian influenza biosecurity: a key for animal and human protection

    | Contributor(s):: Nikolas Charisis

    Modern security methods have provided the best way of preventing the spread of a communicable disease since people realised that human and animal contact can transmit exotic diseases. The avian influenza virus is readily transmitted through animal vectors and inanimate matter and incurs...

  12. Human and animal sentinels for shared health risks

    | Contributor(s):: P. Rabinowitz, M. Scotch, L. Conti

    The tracking of sentinel health events in humans in order to detect and manage disease risks facing a larger population is a well accepted technique applied to influenza, occupational conditions and emerging infectious diseases. Similarly, animal health professionals routinely track disease...

  13. Sancassania berlesei (Michael, 1903): an opportunistic mite infesting litters in poultry farms causing dermatitis in humans and animals

    | Contributor(s):: M. Principato, F. Lisi, I. Moretta, N. Samra, F. Puccetti

    Reported herein are some cases of human dermatitis caused by S. berlesei, a mite coming from seriously infested poultry farms. It appears unable to determine traumatic lesions on human skin, but it causes itch and inflammation also at the level of mucosas. Besides this mite can be found...

  14. Protozoan Diseases of Livestock in Arunachal Pradesh - An Overview

    | Contributor(s):: T. Tayo, N. Longjam, B. Perme

    The people (Tribes) of Arunachal Pradesh have the natural tendency to remain close contact with animals since immortal. The domestic animals are kept in basement of the house with human occupants in the first floor of same house. They remain in close contact with cattle, sheep, goat, pigs,...

  15. Does Pet Ownership in Infancy Lead to Asthma or Allergy at School Age? Pooled Analysis of Individual Participant Data from 11 European Birth Cohorts

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: K. Lødrup Carlsen, S. Roll, K.H. Carlsen, P. Mowinchel, A. Wijga, B. Brunekreef, M. Torrent, G. Roberts, S.H. Arshad, I. Kull, U. Krämer, A. von Berg, E. Eller, A. Høst, C. Kuehni, B. Spycher, J. Sunyer, C. Chen, A. Reich, A. Asarnoj, C. Puig, O. Herbarth, J. Mahachie John, K. Van Steen, S. Willich, U. Wahn, S. Lau, T. Keil

    Objective To examine the associations between pet keeping in early childhood and asthma and allergies in children aged 6–10 years. Design Pooled analysis of individual participant data of 11 prospective European birth cohorts that recruited a total of over 22,000 children in the...

  16. Living with Cat and Dog Increases Vaginal Colonization with E. coli in pregnant Women

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: J. Stockholm, S. Schojørring, L. Pedersen, A.L. Bischoff, N. Følsgaard, C.G. Carson, B. Chawes, K. Bønnelykke, A. Mølgaard, K.A. Krogfelt, H. Bisgaard

    BackgroundFurred pets in the household are known reservoirs for pathogenic bacteria, but it is not known if transmission of bacteria between pet and owner leads to significantly increased rate of infections. We studied whether cats and dogs living in the household of pregnant women affect the...

  17. Reverse Zoonotic Disease Transmission (Zooanthroponosis): A Systematic Review of Seldom-Documented Human Biological Threats to Animals

    | Contributor(s):: Ali M. Messenger, Amber N. Barnes, Gregory C. Gray

    Background Research regarding zoonotic diseases often focuses on infectious diseases animals have given to humans. However, an increasing number of reports indicate that humans are transmitting pathogens to animals. Recent examples include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus,...

  18. The Characteristics of Wild Rat (Rattus spp.) Populations from an Inner-City Neighborhood with a Focus on Factors Critical to the Understanding of Rat-Associated Zoonoses

    | Contributor(s):: Chelsea G. Himsworth, Claire M. Jardine, Kirbee L. Parsons, Alice Y.T. Feng, David M. Patrick

    Norway and black rats (Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus) are among the most ubiquitous urban wildlife species and are the source of a number of zoonotic diseases responsible for significant human morbidity and mortality in cities around the world. Rodent ecology is a primary determinant of the...

  19. Microsporidia Detection and Genotyping Study of Human Pathogenic E. bieneusi in Animals from Spain

    | Contributor(s):: Ana Luz Galván-Díaz, Angela Magnet, Soledad Fenoy, Nuno Henriques-Gil, María Haro, Francisco Ponce Gordo, Guadalupe Miró, Carmen del Aguila, Fernando Izquierdo

    Microsporidia are ubiquitous parasites infecting all animal phyla and we present evidence that supports their zoonotic potential. Fecal samples taken from domestic (cats and dogs), farm (pigs, rabbits and ostriches) and wild animals (foxes) from different provinces of Spain were evaluated for...

  20. The Burden of Parasitic Zoonoses in Nepal: A Systematic Review

    | Contributor(s):: B. Devleesschauwer, A. Ale, P. Torgerson, N. Praet, C. Mairtens de Noordhout, B.D. Pandey, S.B. Pun, R. Lake, J. Vercruysse, D.D. Joshi, A.H. Havelaar, L. Duchateau, P. Dorny, N. Speybroek

    BackgroundParasitic zoonoses (PZs) pose a significant but often neglected threat to public health, especially in developing countries. In order to obtain a better understanding of their health impact, summary measures of population health may be calculated, such as the Disability-Adjusted Life...