You are here: Home / Tags / human-wildlife interactions / All Categories

Tags: human-wildlife interactions

All Categories (1-20 of 184)

  1. An analysis of human–black bear conflict in Utah

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Julie Ann Miller, Tom S. Smith, Janene Auger, Hal Black, Loreen Allphin

    Conflict between black bears (Ursus americanus) and humans has occurred in Utah, but the records are largely incomplete. To document these events, the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources initiated a black bear sightings and encounters database in 2003, and we updated it. From 2003–2013,...

  2. The Behavior of Humans and Wildlife with Respect to Roads: Insights for Mitigation and Management

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Molly Kathryn Grace

    Road ecology is the study of how roads and wildlife interact. Traditionally, road ecologists have primarily focused on one effect of roads: roadkill. Though roadkill can have devastating effects on wildlife populations, roads have sub-lethal impacts that are gaining more and more attention from...

  3. Effects of human state park visitation rates on escape behavior of white-tailed deer

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Nicholas M. Sutton, Edward J. Heske

    State parks are typically established to preserve natural or native habitats for wildlife while simultaneously providing recreational experiences for humans. However, because of their proximity to urban centers, the level of human visitation associated with state parks may be highly variable....

  4. Proceedings of the Seventeenth Wildlife Damage Management Conference, Orange Beach, AL, February 26-March 1, 2017

    Full-text: Available

    Proceedings full document

  5. Do the Calls of a Bird, the Noisy Miner (Manorina melanocephala), Need Adjustment for Efficient Communication in Urban Anthropogenic Noise?

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Hélène Lowry, Alan Lill, Bob B. M. Wong

    Urban environments are characteristically noisy and this can pose a challenge for animals that communicate acoustically. Although evidence suggests that some birds can make acoustic adjustments that preclude masking of their signals in high-disturbance environments such as cities, studies to...

  6. Integrated Stress and Community Perceptions: Toward an Understanding of Human-Cougar Tolerance

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Lara Brenner

    Evidence suggests that cougars (Puma concolor) are beginning to recolonize their traditional range in the Midwestern and Eastern US, returning to a landscape and a social environment that have changed drastically in a century of absence. Any hope of the cougar’s persistence depends on...

  7. Ecology of Conflict: Marine Food Supply Affects Human-Wildlife Interactions on Land

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Kyle A. Artelle, Sean C. Anderson, John D. Reynolds, Andrew B. Cooper, Paul C. Paquet, Chris T. Darimont

    Human-wildlife conflicts impose considerable costs to people and wildlife worldwide. Most research focuses on proximate causes, offering limited generalizable understanding of ultimate drivers. We tested three competing hypotheses (problem individuals, regional population saturation, limited...

  8. Space use by resident and transient coyotes in an urban–rural landscape mosaic

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Numi Mitchell, MichaelW. Strohbach, Ralph Pratt, Wendy C. Finn, Eric G. Strauss

    Context. Coyotes (Canis latrans) have adapted successfully to human landscape alteration in the past 150 years and in recent decades have successfully moved into urban areas. While this causes concern about human–wildlife conflicts, research also suggests that coyotes tend to avoid humans...

  9. The Ethics of Wildlife Control in Humanized Landscapes

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: John Hadidian, Camilla H Fox, William S Lynn

    The 21st century is witness to an unprecedented and rapid growth of human settlements, from urban centers to wilderness vacation resorts. Concurrent with this has been the growing tolerance and acceptance of many wild animals and humans for one another. This has created an expanding...

  10. Variability and Change in Maasai Views of Wildlife and the Implications for Conservation

    | Contributor(s):: Western, David, Manzolillo Nightingale, D. L., Mose, Victor Nyaliki, Johnson, Ole Sipitiek, Kimiti, Kennedy S.

  11. Human wildlife conflicts and interaction : the impact of oil exploration and development in Buliisa, Uganda

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Isaac Sserwanga

    After discovery of an estimated 2.5 billion of commercially viable oil, worth $2 billion in annual revenue for 20 years in the Albertine graben, Uganda’s pursuit for a middle state income status seemed attainable. However, the oil reserves are situated in biodiversity sensitive area, with...

  12. An ounce of prevention: Quantifying the effects of non-lethal tools on wolf behavior

    | Contributor(s):: Much, Rebecca M., Breck, Stewart W., Lance, Nathan J., Callahan, Peggy

    Human-carnivore conflict is presently on the rise as human populations continue to grow and carnivore conservation efforts gain precedence. The behaviors exhibited by carnivores that cause conflict are often learned; therefore, reducing learning potential though the use of non-lethal tools is...

  13. Assessing Patterns of Human-Wildlife Conflicts and Compensation around a Central Indian Protected Area

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Krithi K. Karanth, Arjun M. Gopalaswamy, Ruth DeFries, Natasha Ballal

    Mitigating crop and livestock loss to wildlife and improving compensation distribution are important for conservation efforts in landscapes where people and wildlife co-occur outside protected areas. The lack of rigorously collected spatial data poses a challenge to management efforts to...

  14. When animals aren't so cuddly | Sankar Ananthanarayanan | TEDxPickeringStreet

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sankar Ananthanarayanan

    When you think of Wildlife Conservation, what do you picture? Maybe you imagine a Snow Leopard pacing around the Himalayas. Or perhaps you imagine a Giant Panda munching on some bamboo. Not a lot of people would think of an endangered toad or fly! Charismatic megafauna often get a large portion...

  15. Badger-human conflict: an overlooked historical context for bovine TB debates in the UK

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Angela Cassidy

    In Britain, the question of whether to cull wild badgers (Meles meles) in order to control the spread of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in domestic cattle herds has been the source of scientific, public and policy controversy for over 40 years and still shows no sign of resolution. This chapter...

  16. An evaluation of models for an animal care program in wildlife research for Parks Canada

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jacqueline Wepruk, Stephen M Herrero

  17. Landuse practices interface:Human-Wildlife conflict in Lupande game management area

    | Contributor(s):: Peter Ngoma

    Human-Wildlife Conflict (HWC) has become a serious threat to the survival of many endangered species in the world. The sighted examples from different countries such as Kenya, Zimbabwe, Zanzibar, Namibia, China and Peru demonstrate the severity of the conflict and suggest that greater in depth...

  18. Human-Wildlife conflicts in Mwanachingwala conservation area(MCA) Kafue Flats of Zambia

    | Contributor(s):: Mutandalike Choonga S

    The study of the human-wildUfe conflicts in MCA Kafue flats was done in the month of August. The study used a structured questionnaire, focus group discussions and individual intennews unth randomly chosen individuals. Descriptive SPSS software was used to analyze the data at two levels: the...

  19. Modeling perceived risk from coyotes among Chicago residents

    | Contributor(s):: Molly Spacapan

    Coyote management in urban areas has become a concern for wildlife professionals. In the Greater Chicago Metropolitan Region (GCMR) wildlife professionals have received an increased number of complaints from residents. Based on cultural theory and cognitive hierarchy theory, we hypothesized that...

  20. The bear as barometer: the Japanese response to human-bear conflict

    | Contributor(s):: Catherine Heather Knight

    The Asiatic black bear, or 'moon bear', has inhabited Japan since pre-historic times, and is the largest animal to have roamed Honshu, Shikoku and Kyushu since mega-fauna became extinct on the Japanese archipelago after the last glacial period. Despite this, the bear features only rarely...