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  1. Status and Magnitude of Grey Wolf Conflict with Pastoral Communities in the Foothills of the Hindu Kush Region of Pakistan

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Tauheed Ullah Khan, Xiaofeng Luan, Shahid Ahmad, Abdul Mannan, Waqif Khan, Abdul Aziz Khan, Barkat Ullah Khan, Emad Ud Din, Suman Bhattarai, Sher Shah, Sajjad Saeed, Ummay Amara

    Pastoralist–wolf conflict over livestock depredation is the main factor affecting conservation of grey wolf worldwide. Very limited research has been carried out to evaluate the pattern and nature of livestock depredation by wolf. This study aims to determine the status and nature of...

  2. Surgical sterilization impacts on behavior of coyote pairs

    | Contributor(s):: Leary, Tyler, Schultz, Jeffrey T., Young, Julie K.

  3. Unforeseen consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic: Increased frequency of kite-string injuries in magnificent frigatebirds (Fregata magnificens) in Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil

    | Contributor(s):: Goldberg, D. W., Vanstreels, R. E. T., Alcala, M. M., Hurtado, R., Mantovani, P. F., Cunha, L. S. T., Serafini, P. P., Barbosa, A. F.

  4. Using resident-based hazing programs to reduce human–coyote conflicts in urban environments

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Mary Ann Bonnell, Stewart W. Breck

    The concept of hazing (aversive conditioning) is often promoted as a tool for reducing human–coyote (Canis latrans) conflicts in urban environments. Little scientific evidence exists on the effectiveness of hazing, particularly hazing applied by residents (i.e., community-level hazing)....

  5. Coyote Attacks on Humans, 1970-2015: Implications for Reducing the Risks

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Marcy Wilhelm-South, Rex O. Baker, Robert M. Timm

    Beginning with the emerging pattern of urban and suburban coyotes (Canis latrans) attacking humans in southern California in the late 1970s, we analyzed information from reported attacks to better understand the factors contributing to changes in coyote behavior. We subsequently used updated...

  6. Evaluating lethal and nonlethal management options for urban coyotes

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Stewart W. Breck, Sharon A. Poessel, Mary Ann Bonnell

    Human–coyote (Canis latrans) conflict in urban environments is a growing issue in cities throughout the United States, with the primary problem being the development of problem individuals that are overly bold and aggressive with people and pets. Little research has focused on management...

  7. Human–Black Bear Conflicts: A Review of Common Management Practices

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Carl W. Lackey, Stewart W. Breck, Brian F. Wakeling, Bryant White

    The objective of this monograph is to provide wildlife professionals, who respond to human–bear conflicts, with an appraisal of the most common techniques used for mitigating conflicts as well as the benefits and challenges of each technique in a single document. Most human–black...

  8. State Management of Human–Wildlife Conflicts

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Kurt C. VerCauteren, Daniel Hirchert, Scott Hygnstrom

    Many positive experiences are associated with wildlife, from passively watching animals in our backyards to actively hunting in publicly owned forests. Unfortunately, wildlife can be a double- edged sword. Human– wildlife conflicts are pervasive in society, and nearly all...

  9. Large Terrestrial Bird Adapting Behavior in an Urbanized Zone

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Eduardo R. Alexandrino, Juliano A. Bogoni, Ana B. Navarro, Alex A. A. Bovo, Rafael M. Gonçalves, Jacob D. Charters, Juan A. Domini, Katia M. P. M. B. Ferraz

    Wildlife living within urban ecosystems have to adapt or perish. Red-legged Seriema, a large terrestrial bird, are rare in urban ecosystems, however, they have been reported in a medium-sized Brazilian city. We investigated the reasons for this occurrence as well as their behavior. We assessed...

  10. Large Birds of Prey, Policies That Alter Food Availability and Air Traffic: a Risky Mix for Human Safety

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Rubén Moreno-Opo, Antoni Margalida

    Raptors are considered to pose one of the greatest aviation bird strike risk. We investigated raptor bird strikes reported at the largest Spanish airport (Adolfo Suárez Madrid Barajas; AS-MB) from 2009 to 2016 to determine the factors contributing to the increased incidences and develop...

  11. An analysis of human–black bear conflict in Utah

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Julie Ann Miller, Tom S. Smith, Janene Auger, Hal Black, Loreen Allphin

    Conflict between black bears (Ursus americanus) and humans has occurred in Utah, but the records are largely incomplete. To document these events, the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources initiated a black bear sightings and encounters database in 2003, and we updated it. From 2003–2013,...

  12. The Behavior of Humans and Wildlife with Respect to Roads: Insights for Mitigation and Management

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Molly Kathryn Grace

    Road ecology is the study of how roads and wildlife interact. Traditionally, road ecologists have primarily focused on one effect of roads: roadkill. Though roadkill can have devastating effects on wildlife populations, roads have sub-lethal impacts that are gaining more and more attention from...

  13. Effects of human state park visitation rates on escape behavior of white-tailed deer

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Nicholas M. Sutton, Edward J. Heske

    State parks are typically established to preserve natural or native habitats for wildlife while simultaneously providing recreational experiences for humans. However, because of their proximity to urban centers, the level of human visitation associated with state parks may be highly variable....

  14. Proceedings of the Seventeenth Wildlife Damage Management Conference, Orange Beach, AL, February 26-March 1, 2017

    Full-text: Available

    Proceedings full document

  15. Do the Calls of a Bird, the Noisy Miner (Manorina melanocephala), Need Adjustment for Efficient Communication in Urban Anthropogenic Noise?

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Hélène Lowry, Alan Lill, Bob B. M. Wong

    Urban environments are characteristically noisy and this can pose a challenge for animals that communicate acoustically. Although evidence suggests that some birds can make acoustic adjustments that preclude masking of their signals in high-disturbance environments such as cities, studies to...

  16. Integrated Stress and Community Perceptions: Toward an Understanding of Human-Cougar Tolerance

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Lara Brenner

    Evidence suggests that cougars (Puma concolor) are beginning to recolonize their traditional range in the Midwestern and Eastern US, returning to a landscape and a social environment that have changed drastically in a century of absence. Any hope of the cougar’s persistence depends on...

  17. Ecology of Conflict: Marine Food Supply Affects Human-Wildlife Interactions on Land

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Kyle A. Artelle, Sean C. Anderson, John D. Reynolds, Andrew B. Cooper, Paul C. Paquet, Chris T. Darimont

    Human-wildlife conflicts impose considerable costs to people and wildlife worldwide. Most research focuses on proximate causes, offering limited generalizable understanding of ultimate drivers. We tested three competing hypotheses (problem individuals, regional population saturation, limited...

  18. Space use by resident and transient coyotes in an urban–rural landscape mosaic

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Numi Mitchell, MichaelW. Strohbach, Ralph Pratt, Wendy C. Finn, Eric G. Strauss

    Context. Coyotes (Canis latrans) have adapted successfully to human landscape alteration in the past 150 years and in recent decades have successfully moved into urban areas. While this causes concern about human–wildlife conflicts, research also suggests that coyotes tend to avoid humans...

  19. The Ethics of Wildlife Control in Humanized Landscapes

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: John Hadidian, Camilla H Fox, William S Lynn

    The 21st century is witness to an unprecedented and rapid growth of human settlements, from urban centers to wilderness vacation resorts. Concurrent with this has been the growing tolerance and acceptance of many wild animals and humans for one another. This has created an expanding...

  20. Variability and Change in Maasai Views of Wildlife and the Implications for Conservation

    | Contributor(s):: Western, David, Manzolillo Nightingale, D. L., Mose, Victor Nyaliki, Johnson, Ole Sipitiek, Kimiti, Kennedy S.