You are here: Home / Tags / human-wildlife interactions / Reports

Tags: human-wildlife interactions

Resources (1-20 of 176)

  1. Human dolphin interactions on the west coast of Florida : documentation from MML's Marine Mammal Response Program.

    Contributor(s):: Margaret A. Morgan, Geoffrey W. Patton

    Use of Mote's role as a participant in the operation of the U.S. Marine Mammal Stranding Network to document human and marine mammal interactions.

  2. Animal Conservation and Human Survival: A Case Study of The Tembomvura People of Chapato Ward In The Zambezi Valley, Zimbabwe

    Contributor(s):: Ravai Marindo-Ranganai, Basia Zaba

  3. The effects of wildlife-livestock-human interactions on habitat in the Meru Conservation Area, Kenya

    Contributor(s):: J. Otuoma

  4. Comparison of Intervention Programs Designed to Reduce Human-Bear Conflict: A Review of the Literature

    Contributor(s):: Meredith L. Gore

    Black bear populations are increasing throughout North America (McCracken 1995, Peine 2001). Typically, when areas of black bear population expansion overlap regions of substantial human use (e.g., a suburban neighborhood or tourist destination), conflict can ensue. Human-bear conflict is an...

  5. Stakeholder insights into the human-coyote interface in Westchester County, New York

    Contributor(s):: Heather W. Hudenko, Daniel J. Decker, William F. Siemer

    In recent decades, a number of factors have contributed to an increased potential for conflict between people and coyotes (Canis latrans). Problematic interactions between people and coyotes have occurred in many highly developed areas across the United States. Over the last few years in New York...

  6. Monitoring and predicting traffic induced vertebrate mortality near wetlands

    Contributor(s):: J. Andrew DeWoody, Jamie M. Nogle, Melissa Hoover, Barny Dunning

    Animal-vehicle collisions are undesirable to the general public, to drivers, to insurance providers, to biologists, and presumably to the animals themselves. However, traffic-induced mortality (―roadkill‖) is difficult to mitigate in large part because scientists lack the empirical data required...