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  1. Human wildlife conflicts and interaction : the impact of oil exploration and development in Buliisa, Uganda

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Isaac Sserwanga

    After discovery of an estimated 2.5 billion of commercially viable oil, worth $2 billion in annual revenue for 20 years in the Albertine graben, Uganda’s pursuit for a middle state income status seemed attainable. However, the oil reserves are situated in biodiversity sensitive area, with...

  2. An evaluation of models for an animal care program in wildlife research for Parks Canada

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jacqueline Wepruk, Stephen M Herrero

  3. Understanding Spinner Dolphin Marine Tourism in Hawai'i: A Social Approach to Assessing Underwater Interactions

    | Contributor(s):: Carlie S. Wiener

    The popularity of wild spinner dolphin interactions in the Hawaiian Islands has led to the expansion of businesses that incorporate in-water experiences with the dolphins. The growth of dolphin-related commerce has spread so quickly that regulations have not been able to keep up. Subsequently,...

  4. Landuse practices interface:Human-Wildlife conflict in Lupande game management area

    | Contributor(s):: Peter Ngoma

    Human-Wildlife Conflict (HWC) has become a serious threat to the survival of many endangered species in the world. The sighted examples from different countries such as Kenya, Zimbabwe, Zanzibar, Namibia, China and Peru demonstrate the severity of the conflict and suggest that greater in depth...

  5. Human-Wildlife conflicts in Mwanachingwala conservation area(MCA) Kafue Flats of Zambia

    | Contributor(s):: Mutandalike Choonga S

    The study of the human-wildUfe conflicts in MCA Kafue flats was done in the month of August. The study used a structured questionnaire, focus group discussions and individual intennews unth randomly chosen individuals. Descriptive SPSS software was used to analyze the data at two levels: the...

  6. Modeling perceived risk from coyotes among Chicago residents

    | Contributor(s):: Molly Spacapan

    Coyote management in urban areas has become a concern for wildlife professionals. In the Greater Chicago Metropolitan Region (GCMR) wildlife professionals have received an increased number of complaints from residents. Based on cultural theory and cognitive hierarchy theory, we hypothesized that...

  7. The bear as barometer: the Japanese response to human-bear conflict

    | Contributor(s):: Catherine Heather Knight

    The Asiatic black bear, or 'moon bear', has inhabited Japan since pre-historic times, and is the largest animal to have roamed Honshu, Shikoku and Kyushu since mega-fauna became extinct on the Japanese archipelago after the last glacial period. Despite this, the bear features only rarely...

  8. Unifying ecological and social sciences into a management framework for wildlife-based tourism: a case study of feeding stingrays as a marine tourism attraction in the Cayman Islands

    | Contributor(s):: Christina A.D. Semeniuk

    As marine wildlife tourism attractions increase in popularity, the integration of natural and social sciences is required to ascertain and then assimilate strategies to effectively address the undesirable ecological and social conditions of the wildlife tourism setting. The overarching objective...

  9. Behavior of Scandinavian brown bears when encountered by dogs and humans

    | Contributor(s):: Stine Emilie Noding Hansen

    The Scandinavian brown bear population was persecuted in the last half of the 1800s and almost went extinct. They got protected in Sweden in 1927 and in Norway in 1973, and have since reached a level that can be hunted. The bears choose areas with as little human activity as possible, but...

  10. Evaluating Human Threats to Three Canid Species of the Brazilian Cerrado

    | Contributor(s):: Stacie M. Bickley

    The hoary fox (Lycalopex vetulus), crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous), and maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), are three canid species that are sympatric in the Brazilian Cerrado. In some areas in central Brazil, more than 80% of the Cerrado ecosystem has been converted into agricultural fields...

  11. Survey of Attitudes Toward, Conflicts With and Management Of Wolves and Bears in Rural Villages in Armenia

    | Contributor(s):: Serda Ozbenian

    Many studies aimed at assessing human attitudes towards and negative interactions  (conflicts) with carnivores, such as wolves (Canis lupus) and bears (Ursus arctos), have  been conducted throughout the world. Although villagers in Armenia have reported  conflicts with these...

  12. Who's Afraid of the Big, Bad Coyote? A Survey of Messaging and Existing Attitudes in the National Capital Region

    | Contributor(s):: Megan Draheim

    Coyotes are relatively recent arrivals to the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. In an  effort to understand and obtain baseline data about existing attitudes, a survey was  conducted in 2006. Most respondents had neutral attitudes towards coyotes, which might  be in part due to...

  13. Attitudes Toward and Perceptions of Deer Management in Suburban Boston

    | Contributor(s):: Michael Devito

    Communities in the United States have experienced a large and growing white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) population. Residents in these communities may enjoy encounters with white-tailed deer, but they also perceive problems with deer such as car collisions, garden damage, and Lyme...

  14. Alternative Methods of Controlling Wildlife Populations

    | Contributor(s):: Lindsay Aspin, Chantel McDowell, Rebecca Rocha, Julie M. Fagan

    Every year New Jersey sets aside several days for a state-sponsored black bear hunt. We feel that this hunt is unnecessary, and that proper human behaviors will change black bear behavior, and ultimately decrease human-bear interactions. This way, humans are at peace, and bears are at peace, and...

  15. Human and Black Bear Interactions in Buncombe County, North Carolina, from 1993–2013

    | Contributor(s):: Adam Guy Alsamadisi

    Over the past 20 years the frequency of interactions between humans and black bears in Buncombe County, North Carolina has been increasing, posing threats to human safety, black bear populations, ecological stability, and conservation support. During this time, both the human population and the...

  16. Behaviour of brown bears (Ursus arctos) when repeatedly approached by humans on foot

    | Contributor(s):: Nina Emilie Stenset

    Knowledge about encounters between humans and wildlife is important for conservation, management and policymaking, as well as for reducing conflict and negative interactions. There is general concern that an increased number of encounters might reduce wildlife flight responses. I investigated the...

  17. The Effect of Human Activity on the Welfare of the African Elephant (Loxodonta africana) in Namibia

    | Contributor(s):: Iris Hagvag Ringstad

    The African elephant (Loxodonta africana) is vital in several African ecosystems, accentuating the importance of conserving them. However, conservation efforts are constantly complicated due to human population growth. Anthropogenic disturbances has been linked with elevated stress levels in...

  18. Effect of mountain biking on red deer (Cervus elaphus) in Kaupanger, Norway

    | Contributor(s):: Janneke Scholten

    Human outdoor activities, like mountain biking, often affect animal behaviour. Ungulates might avoid roads and trails, and increase their avoidance with increasing human activity. Recently, biking on forest trails has increased considerably in Norway, but we still have limited knowledge about how...

  19. Human- Wildlife Conflict - The case of elephant at Mole National Park

    | Contributor(s):: Zodiac Akenten

    Conflicts between wildlife and humans, particularly people who share immediate boundaries with protected areas, are common phenomenon. Declining wildlife resources has been linked to human actions through overexploitation, habitat destruction, and habitat fragmentation among others. Local people...

  20. Distribution Patterns of Human Elephant Conflict in Areas Adjacent to Rungwa Game Reserve, Tanzania

    | Contributor(s):: Wilbright Munuo

    Human pressure on terrestrial ecosystems has caused loss and fragmentation of habitats for wildlife species. That has brought humans and wildlife in close proximity intensifying human wildlife conflicts, especially when wild animals with wide home ranges, such as African and Asian elephants, are...