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All Categories (21-40 of 115)

  1. Enteric pathogens of dogs and cats with public health implications

    Contributor(s):: Kantere, M., Athanasiou, L. V., Chatzopoulos, D. C., Spyrou, V., Valiakos, G., Kontos, V., Billinis, C.

    Dogs and cats play an important role in modern society, enhancing the psychological and physiological well-being of many people. However, there are well-documented health risks associated with human animal interactions. More specifically, enteric pathogens of zoonotic risk which are transmitted...

  2. Rooting area and drinker affect dunging behaviour of organic pigs

    Contributor(s):: Vermeer, H. M., Altena, H., Vereijken, P. F. G., Bracke, M. B. M.

    Hygiene is a common problem on outdoor runs of growing organic pigs. Manure and urine are mainly excreted outdoors and tend to spread all over the run. Reducing the soiled surface area may be beneficial to animal welfare, hygiene, ammonia emissions and labour, not only in organic but also in...

  3. Zoonotic disease risks for immunocompromised and other high-risk clients and staff: promoting safe pet ownership and contact

    Contributor(s):: Stull, J. W., Stevenson, K. B.

    Pets can be a source of disease (zoonoses) for humans. The disease risks associated with pet contact are highest among young children, the elderly, pregnant women, and immunocompromised hosts. These individuals and household members display limited knowledge of pet-associated disease, rarely...

  4. Zoonotic disease risks for immunocompromised and other high-risk clients and staff: promoting safe pet ownership and contact

    Contributor(s):: Stull, J. W., Stevenson, K. B.

    Pets can be a source of disease (zoonoses) for humans. The disease risks associated with pet contact are highest among young children, the elderly, pregnant women, and immunocompromised hosts. These individuals and household members display limited knowledge of pet-associated disease, rarely...

  5. Catch me if you can: monkey capture in Delhi

    Contributor(s):: Gandhi, Ajay

  6. An online social network to increase walking in dog owners: a randomized trial

    Contributor(s):: Schneider, K. L., Murphy, D., Ferrara, C., Oleski, J., Panza, E., Savage, C., Gada, K., Bozzella, B., Olendzki, E., Kern, D., Lemon, S. C.

    Purpose: Encouraging dog walking may increase physical activity in dog owners. This cluster-randomized controlled trial investigated whether a social networking Web site (Meetup TM) could be used to deliver a multicomponent dog walking intervention to increase physical activity. Methods:...

  7. Denial of death and the relationship between humans and other animals

    Contributor(s):: Marino, L., Mountain, M.

    The focus of this paper is to explore how cultural anthropologist Ernest Becker's claim that human behavior is largely motivated by fear of death may explain important aspects of our relationship with nonhuman animals. Terror management theory (tmt) suggests that when we humans are reminded of...

  8. The ticking clock: addressing farm animal welfare in emerging countries

    Contributor(s):: Keyserlingk, M. A. G. von, Hotzel, M. J.

    Over the last decade many emerging economies, and in particular Brazil, have established themselves as major players in global food animal production. Within these countries much of the increase in food animal production has been achieved by the adoption of intensive housing systems similar to...

  9. Well-being and its roots

    Contributor(s):: Fraser, A. F.

    This chapter describes the physiological and behavioural indicators of health and well-being in cats. The specific behavioural traits of some different cat breeds are also included.

  10. "first things first": application of Islamic principles of priority in the ethical assessment of genetically modified foods

    Contributor(s):: Noor Munirah, Isa, Saadan, Man

    Advancement of modern agricultural biotechnology has brought various potential benefits to humankind, but at the same time ethical concerns regarding some applications such as genetically modified foods (GMF) have been raised among the public. Several questions are being posed; should they...

  11. Cultivating greater well-being: the benefits Thai organic farmers experience from adopting Buddhist eco-spirituality

    Contributor(s):: Kaufman, A. H., Mock, J.

    Organic farming is spreading throughout Asia, including in Thailand. Little is known about whether farmers' values change as they make the shift from conventional farming to organic farming. The benefits farmers perceive from making the shift have also scarcely been studied. We investigated these...

  12. Food security: one of a number of 'securities' we need for a full life: an Australian perspective

    Contributor(s):: Farmar-Bowers, Q.

    Although agriculture in Australia is very productive, the current food supply systems in Australia fail to deliver healthy diets to all Australians and fail to protect the natural resources on which they depend. The operation of the food systems creates 'collateral damage' to the natural...

  13. The prevalence and implications of human-animal co-sleeping in an Australian sample

    Contributor(s):: Smith, B., Thompson, K., Clarkson, L., Dawson, D.

    Sleep research is characterized by an interest in humans, with the realm of animal sleep left largely to ethologists and animal scientists. However, the lives of sleep-study participants and those with sleep problems frequently involve animals. For the majority of the population in developed...

  14. An epidemiological approach to welfare research in zoos: the Elephant Welfare Project

    Contributor(s):: Carlstead, K., Mench, J. A., Meehan, C., Brown, J. L.

    Multi-institutional studies of welfare have proven to be valuable in zoos but are hampered by limited sample sizes and difficulty in evaluating more than just a few welfare indicators. To more clearly understand how interactions of husbandry factors influence the interrelationships among welfare...

  15. Hediger revisited: how do zoo animals see us?

    Contributor(s):: Hosey, G.

    Contact with people, both familiar (e.g., caretakers) and unfamiliar (e.g., members of the public), is a significant part of the lives of nonhuman animals in zoos. The available empirical evidence shows that in many cases this contact represents a source of stress to the animals, although there...

  16. Morbidity and mortality of invertebrates, amphibians, reptiles, and mammals at a major exotic companion animal wholesaler

    Contributor(s):: Ashley, S., Brown, S., Ledford, J., Martin, J., Nash, A. E., Terry, A., Tristan, T., Warwick, C.

    The authors formally investigated a major international wildlife wholesaler and subsequently confiscated more than 26,400 nonhuman animals of 171 species and types. Approximately 80% of the nonhuman animals were identified as grossly sick, injured, or dead, with the remaining in suspected...

  17. Welfare evaluations of nonhuman animals in selected zoos in the Philippines

    Contributor(s):: Almazan, R. R., Rubio, R. P., Agoramoorthy, G.

    This study evaluated 3 zoos in the Philippines: the Wildlife Rescue Center and Mini Zoo, Manila Zoological and Botanical Garden, and Cavite Botanical and Zoological Park to determine the standards of nonhuman animal welfare. The study measured and compared the cage sizes of various animals to the...

  18. Welfare, health, and hygiene of laying hens housed in furnished cages and in alternative housing systems

    Contributor(s):: Rodenburg, T. B., Tuyttens, F. A. M., Sonck, B., Reu, K. de, Herman, L., Zoons, J.

    The aim of this review was to compare welfare, health, and hygienic status of laying hens housed in furnished cages and in alternative systems. In alternative systems (floor housing and aviaries), birds have more freedom of movement and a more complex environment than in furnished cages. However,...

  19. Are therapy dogs like xanax? Does animal-assisted therapy impact processes relevant to cognitive behavioral psychotherapy?

    Contributor(s):: Hunt, M. G., Chizkov, R. R.

    Despite an increase in the popularity of animal-assisted therapy, little is known about the impact of animals on processes relevant to effective psychotherapy. This study tested the impact of having a dog present on process variables relevant to cognitive behavioral therapy, including emotional...

  20. Industrial farm animal production: a comprehensive moral critique

    Contributor(s):: Rossi, J., Garner, S. A.

    Over the past century, animal agriculture in the United States has transformed from a system of small, family farms to a largely industrialized model-often known as 'industrial farm animal production' (IFAP). This model has successfully produced a large supply of cheap meat, eggs and dairy...