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  1. Mississippi waterfowl hunter expectations, satisfaction, and intentions to hunt in the future

    Contributor(s):: Brunke, Kevin D., Hunt, Kevin M.

    Disconfirmation of expectations, season-long satisfaction, seeing waterfowl, and waterfowl harvest opportunity may affect the intentions to waterfowl hunt in the future for Mississippi hunters. In this study, the disconfirmation of expectations had the strongest relationship with satisfaction for...

  2. Social and cognitive correlates of Utah residents’ acceptance of the lethal control of wolves

    Contributor(s):: Bruskotter, Jeremy T., Vaske, Jerry J., Schmidt, Robert H.

    The objectives of this study were to: (a) determine the acceptability of several methods of lethal and non-lethal wolf control, (b) identify factors that explain acceptability of lethal control, and (c) test a model for predicting acceptability of lethal control. Data were obtained from a mail...

  3. Strengthening partnerships for effective wildlife rescue in the Panama Canal expansion area

    Contributor(s):: Correa, Nestor J., Carver, Andrew D., Master, Roberto

    The Central American country of Panama is located in one of the most biologically diverse regions in the world. The 714,628-acre Panama Canal Watershed (PCW) alone provides habitat for thousands of plant and animal species, including 159 species of mammals and 564 bird species. A rapid ecological...

  4. Communicating the role of hunting for wildlife management

    Contributor(s):: Campbell, Michael, Mackay, Kelly J.

    Wildlife management agencies are increasingly faced with decisions where different groups hold conflicting attitudes and values with respect to the action taken. Identifying and understanding divergent views is essential in guiding the decisions of wildlife management. Occasionally, public...

  5. Stories about wildlife: Developing an instrument for identifying wildlife value orientations cross-culturally

    Contributor(s):: Dayer, Ashley A., Stinchfield, Holly M., Manfredo, Michael J.

    The need for cross-cultural research to better understand the relationships between humans and wildlife was one of the driving factors in the instigation of the Wildlife Values Globally project. A fundamental challenge in fulfilling this need is developing appropriate methods that can elicit...

  6. Maintaining complex relations with large cats: Maasai and lions in Kenya and Tanzania

    Contributor(s):: Goldman, Mara J., De Pinho, Joana Roque, Perry, Jennifer

    Research and conservation efforts often occur in areas outside of national parks where people live, often side-by-side and sometimes in conflict with large carnivores. In Tanzania and Kenya much of this work employs a human-wildlife conflict perspective and is based in Maasai areas, where many of...

  7. Campground manager and user perceptions of risk associated with negative human-black bear interactions

    Contributor(s):: Gore, Meredith L., Knuth, Barbara A., Curtis, Paul D., Shanahan, James E.

    Negative human-black bear interactions in New York's Adirondack Park campgrounds pose risk management challenges. Communication is one tool available to modify human behavior and reduce associated risks, but knowledge of constructs influencing risk perception among key stakeholder groups is...

  8. The effects of a companion animal on distress in children undergoing dental procedures

    Contributor(s):: Havener, LeAnn, Gentes, Lisa, Thaler, Barbara, Megel, Mary E., Baun, Mara M., Driscoll, Frank A., Beiraghi, Soraya, Agrawal, Ngeeta

    Evaluated the effects of a companion animal (dog) on physiologic arousal and behavioral distress among children undergoing a dental procedure. A repeated measures experimental design was used to study 40 children (aged 7–11 yrs) who were undergoing procedures in a pediatric dental clinic. Half...

  9. Why do we like or dislike animals?

    Contributor(s):: Jacobs, Maarten H.

    Animals are strong emotional triggers for us. The goal of this article is to identify causes and mechanisms that constitute liking or disliking animals. By combining deductions from emotion theory with empirical findings, six categories of causes can be distinguished: (1) an innate sensitivity...

  10. Wildlife value orientations of rural Mongolians

    Contributor(s):: Kaczensky, Petra

    Mongolia provides an interesting example to study wildlife value orientations (WVOs), because of its long tradition as a society based on pastoral nomadism and the dramatic changes in the socioeconomic situation during the recent transition from socialism toward a market economy. In the summer of...

  11. Living with Problem Animals--Self-Reported Fear of Potentially Dangerous Species in the Serengeti Region, Tanzania

    Contributor(s):: Kaltenborn, Bjørn P., Bjerke, Tore, Nyahongo, Julius

    We examined the relationship between self-reported fear of large carnivores and the demographic characteristics of villagers living in a rural district adjacent to Serengeti National Park in Tanzania. Data were obtained from 593 respondents living in 8 villages. The intensity of verbally...

  12. Factors affecting perceptions of human–wildlife interactions in residential areas of northern New York and implications for conservation

    Contributor(s):: Kretser, Heidi E., Curtis, Paul D., Francis, Joseph D., Pendall, Rolf J., Knuth, Barbara A.

    We explored factors influencing people's perceptions of human-wildlife interactions in residential areas, reporting interactions to authorities, and potential conservation implications. Data were obtained from a mail survey of 1,439 landowners. We used logistic regression to predict probabilities...

  13. Landscape, social, and spatial influences on perceptions of human-Black bear interactions in the Adirondack Park, NY

    Contributor(s):: Kretser, Heidi E., Curtis, Paul D., Knuth, Barbara A.

    Effective methods to identify areas and people prone to human-wildlife conflicts help wildlife and land managers develop strategies that minimize unwanted human-wildlife interactions. We combined landscape variables (i.e., housing density, habitat quality) with data on local land use practices...

  14. Perceptions of polar bear tourists: A qualitative analysis

    Contributor(s):: Lemelin, Raynald Harvey, Wiersma, Elaine C.

    A number of themes and concepts emerged from 18 interviews conducted with polar bear tourists visiting the Churchill Wildlife Management Area, near Churchill, Manitoba. This article focuses on themes relating to environmental dimensions of polar bear tourism. These include environmental concerns,...

  15. The former 'goose hunting capital of the world': Southern Illinois Hunting Club owners' beliefs, attitudes, and responses associated with shifts in goose migration

    Contributor(s):: Lindsay, Travis G., Davenport, Mae A., Mangun, Jean C.

    Waterfowl management is inherently complex, given shifting population dynamics and intensifying social and economic interests. This qualitative case analysis provides an exploratory examination of the human dimensions of waterfowl management, specifically the beliefs, attitudes, and business...

  16. Saying goodbye: pet loss and its implications

    Contributor(s):: Duffey, Thelma

    Pets can be loyal, loving, and entertaining members of a family. Their deaths are generally experienced as painful losses by the people who love them, even though the grief experience is often culturally disenfranchised. In this manuscript, the authors discuss the role that pets can play in a...

  17. Equine-facilitated prison-based programs within the context of prison-based animal programs: State of the science review

    Contributor(s):: Bachi, Keren

    Equine-facilitated prison programs have become more prevalent and operate in correctional facilities in 13 states throughout the United States. However, there is a deficit of empirical knowledge to guide them. This article reviews 19 studies of prison-based animal programs and centers on patterns...

  18. Measuring emotions toward wildlife: A review of generic methods and instruments

    Contributor(s):: Jacobs, Maarten H., Fehres, Piera, Campbell, Michael

    Researchers are recognizing the importance of studying emotions for understanding human–wildlife interactions. This article reviews generic methods and instruments for assessing emotions, as developed within the affective sciences. Four broad categories of emotion measures can be distinguished:...

  19. Promoting nonhuman animal welfare: Interactions with caregivers and zoo visitors

    Contributor(s):: Jensvold, Mary Lee, Zager, Lindsay, Bismanovsky, Daniella

    Apes are by nature an extremely social species, and relationships with group members are a critical aspect of life. Apes in captivity also manage relationships with humans including caregivers and visitors to public facilities, and these relationships can affect nonhuman animal welfare. This...

  20. Biological and social investigation of human–black bear conflicts in the Panhandle of Florida

    Contributor(s):: Lowery, Damon R., Morse, Wayde C., Steury, Todd D.

    As human–black bear conflicts increase, developing conflict mitigation strategies that account for both biological and social understanding has become a primary objective of managers. We examined black bear habitat use in the Florida Panhandle to understand its impact on the spatial distribution...