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  1. Fostering a More Humane University Environment Through Course Work, Service-Learning, and Animal-Assisted Interventions and Activities

    Full-text: Available

    Contributor(s):: Aubrey H. Fine, Philip Tedeschi, Teal Mackintosh, Jane Boone

    Incorporating coursework on animal-assisted interventions and human animal interactions has become a viable option for students in higher education. These educational opportunities appear to enhance the quality of education the students receive as well as improve the experience of students...

  2. Animal-assisted interventions as an adjunct to therapy for youth: Clinician perspectives

    Contributor(s):: Flynn, Erin, Gandenberger, Jaci, Mueller, Megan K., Morris, Kevin N.

  3. Randomized Trial Examining Effects of Animal Assisted Intervention and Stress Related Symptoms on College Students' Learning and Study Skills

    Contributor(s):: Pendry, P., Carr, A. M., Gee, N. R., Vandagriff, J. L.

  4. A review of video-based pig behavior recognition

    Contributor(s):: Yang, Qiumei, Xiao, Deqin

    Video surveillance technology has been applied in many farms and a large amount of video data has been generated. Extracting valuable information about the pig industry from video data is a challenging problem. Pig behavior recognition is one of the research hotspots. In order to facilitate...

  5. Of browse, goats, and men: Contribution to the debate on animal traditions and cultures

    Contributor(s):: Landau, S. Y., Provenza, F. D.

    Much circumstantial evidence has accumulated for ape culture, based on observations of the transfer of adult expertise to novices, typically juveniles. Controlled experiments have ruled out environmental or genetic explanations for these social learning propensities. This acumen might not be...

  6. Operant learning is disrupted when opioid reward pathways are blocked in the domesticated hen

    Contributor(s):: Fountain, Jade, Hazel, Susan J., Ryan, Terry, Taylor, Peta S.

    There is limited research into mesolimbic function specific to birds and, specifically, how neurobiological reward mechanisms affect learning in domestic laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus). A more thorough understanding of these mechanisms has implications for the improvement of welfare....

  7. Stereotypic behaviour in horses lowers stress but not spatial learning performance

    Contributor(s):: Briefer Freymond, S., Beuret, S., Ruet, A., Zuberbühler, K., Bachmann, I., Briefer, E. F.

    Stereotypies are common in captive animals, but it remains unclear if they are pathological by-products of captive conditions or if they have an adaptive function. Here, we address this question using crib-biting, a common type of stereotypic behaviour in domestic horses, thought to result from...

  8. NEW THERAPEUTIC PROFESSIONS : ART-THERAPY AND ANIMAL ASSISTED PSYCHOTHERAPY AS A RESOURCE FOR BETTER INCLUSION

    Contributor(s):: Bar-On, S., Eshkar, M.

    20192706-2706978-84-09-08619-1Iated-Int Assoc Technology Education & DevelopmentValenicaEnglish[Bar-On, S.] Levinsky Coll Educ, Tel Aviv, Israel.Bar-On, S (corresponding author), Levinsky Coll Educ, Tel Aviv, Israel.text

  9. The Effects of Dogs on Learning: A Meta-Analysis

    Contributor(s):: Reilly, Katie M., Adesope, Olusola O., Erdman, Phyllis

    Integrating dogs into learning environments is becoming more prevalent as growing evidence demonstrates positive benefits of dogs on human functioning. To date, there is no known quantitative review of research that specifically investigates the impacts of dogs within school/classroom...

  10. Behavioural fever, fish welfare and what farmers and fishers know

    Contributor(s):: Huntingford, Felicity, Rey, Sonia, Quaggiotto, Maria-Martina

    In this article we first describe briefly how, like other ectotherms, wild fish promote effective functioning (for example, digestion and reproductive maturation) by moving through the temperature gradients that they experience in their natural habitats (showing behavioural thermoregulation). We...

  11. Preliminary study on current perceptions and usage of training equipment by horse enthusiasts in Canada

    Contributor(s):: Merkies, Katrina, Nakonechny, Lindsay, DuBois, Cordelie, Derisoud, Emilie

    Training practices may impose restrictions on the equine behavioral repertoire through the use of training equipment. Presently, the prevalence of the use of training equipment in Canada is unknown. Through an online survey for horse enthusiasts (n = 654), this study evaluated the prevalence and...

  12. Understanding and Application of Learning Theory in UK-based Equestrians

    Contributor(s):: Brown, Sarah M., Connor, Melanie

    Learning in equines occurs through a predictable chain of stimulus–response–consequence processing. Whether the behavior persists will depend on the nature and timing of the consequence, whether it punishes or reinforces the response behavior. Knowledge and application of learning theory in...

  13. Use of conditioned place preference/avoidance tests to assess affective states in fish

    Contributor(s):: Millot, Sandie, Cerqueira, Marco, Castanheira, Maria Filipa, Øverli, Øyvind, Martins, Catarina I. M., Oliveira, Rui F.

    Animal welfare has been defined as the balance between positive and negative experiences or affective states. Despite the growing evidence of complex cognitive abilities and the expression of affective states such as pain and fear, very little is known about ability to experience memory based...

  14. Operant conditioning of urination by calves

    Contributor(s):: Vaughan, Alison, de Passillé, Anne Marie, Stookey, Joseph, Rushen, Jeffrey

    The accumulation of faeces and urine in dairy barns is a cause of cattle and human health concerns and environmental problems. It is usually assumed that cattle are not capable of controlling defecation and urination. We tested whether calves could be taught to urinate in a location using either...

  15. Learning performance of gestating sows called to the feeder

    Contributor(s):: Kirchner, Jasmin, Manteuffel, Christian, Manteuffel, Gerhard, Schrader, Lars

    A call feeding station in which sows learn to be allowed to enter a feeding station only after being called by an individual acoustic signal has been shown to reduce agonistic interactions in front of the feeding station. Here, we tested important prerequisites for integration of a call feeding...

  16. Lack of mirror use by pigs to locate food

    Contributor(s):: Gieling, Elise T., Mijdam, Elco, van der Staay, F. Josef, Nordquist, Rebecca E.

    Many mammalian species, as well as birds, are able to use a mirror either in the context of self-recognition, or instrumentally for discovering and manipulating objects that cannot be perceived directly. A noteworthy study by Broom et al. (2009) investigated the ability of pigs (Sus scrofa) to...

  17. Facilitating ‘learning from mom how to eat like a pig’ to improve welfare of piglets around weaning

    Contributor(s):: Oostindjer, Marije, Kemp, Bas, van den Brand, Henry, Bolhuis, J. Elizabeth

    Piglets in commercial husbandry are weaned abruptly and at a rather young age. Many weanling piglets are poorly adapted to ingest solid food, often resulting in a period of underfeeding. The underfeeding generally leads to a poor growth, diarrhoea occurrence and the development of damaging...

  18. Effects of signalled reward type, food status and a μ-opioid receptor antagonist on cue-induced anticipatory behaviour in laying hens (Gallus domesticus)

    Contributor(s):: Moe, Randi Oppermann, Nordgreen, Janicke, Janczak, Andrew M., Spruijt, Berry M., Bakken, Morten

    Studies using classical conditioning have shown that hens display high frequencies of dopamine-controlled cue-induced anticipatory behaviours in the cue-reward interval when signalling mealworm rewards. However, it is not known whether anticipatory behaviours are reward specific, and whether the...

  19. Does stocking density modify affective state in pigs as assessed by cognitive bias, behavioural and physiological parameters?

    Contributor(s):: Scollo, Annalisa, Gottardo, Flaviana, Contiero, Barbara, Edwards, Sandra A.

    Recent studies suggest that emotional state can affect cognitive abilities of humans and non-human animals, determining biases in information processing. Negative mental states, such as anxiety or depression, induce pessimistic judgments of ambiguous stimuli. These assumptions may be used to...

  20. Chronic stress induces pessimistic-like judgment and learning deficits in sheep

    Contributor(s):: Destrez, Alexandra, Deiss, Véronique, Lévy, Frédéric, Calandreau, Ludovic, Lee, Caroline, Chaillou-Sagon, Elodie, Boissy, Alain

    Chronic stress can be described as a long-term negative affective state induced by an accumulation of negative emotional experiences that alters an individual's interactions with the environment. In humans, chronic stress induces both persistent judgment biases and learning deficits. We...