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  1. Tailored Enrichment Strategies and Stereotypic Behavior in Captive Individually Housed Macaques (Macaca spp.)

    Contributor(s):: Cannon, Tessa H., Heistermann, Michael, Hankison, Shala J., Hockings, Kimberley J., McLennan, Matthew R.

    The welfare of nonhuman animals in captivity is widely dependent on the natural psychological, physical, and behavioral needs of the animals and how adequately these needs are met. Inability to engage in natural behaviors can lead to chronic stress and expression of stereotypic behavior. The...

  2. Use of video system and its effects on abnormal behaviour in captive Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata)

    Contributor(s):: Ogura, Tadatoshi

    Although nonhuman primates have highly developed visual cognitive abilities, they have few opportunities to exert such abilities in captivity. Video presentation can reproduce multiple features of the complex, real, visual world. Therefore, video presentation can be expected to act as...

  3. A response to the influence of observer presence on baboon (Papio spp.) and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) behavior: A comment on

    Contributor(s):: Lutz, Corrine K., Nevill, Christian H.

    2011Applied Animal Behaviour Science129155-560168-159110.1016/j.applanim.2010.11.008text

  4. The Frequencies of Immunosuppressive Cells in Adipose Tissue Differ in Human, Non-human Primate, and Mouse Models

    Contributor(s):: Laparra, A., Tricot, S., Le Van, M., Damouche, A., Gorwood, J., Vaslin, B., Favier, B., Benoist, S., Ho Tsong Fang, R., Bosquet, N., Le Grand, R., Chapon, C., Lambotte, O., Bourgeois, C.

  5. The effects of cognitive testing on the welfare of zoo-housed Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata)

    Contributor(s):: Jacobson, Sarah L., Kwiatt, Anne C., Ross, Stephen R., Cronin, Katherine A.

    Cognitive testing programs are being implemented more frequently in zoo settings due to the benefits these programs can provide for the animals, researchers and zoo visitors. However, the impact that cognitive studies have on the welfare of captive animals, particularly for primates in a social...

  6. A protocol for training group-housed rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) to cooperate with husbandry and research procedures using positive reinforcement

    Contributor(s):: Kemp, Caralyn, Thatcher, Harriet, Farningham, David, Witham, Claire, MacLarnon, Ann, Holmes, Amanda, Semple, Stuart, Bethell, Emily J.

    There has been increased recognition of the 3Rs in laboratory animal management over the last decade, including improvements in animal handling and housing. For example, positive reinforcement is now more widely used to encourage primates to cooperate with husbandry procedures, and improved...

  7. A Tinbergian review of self-injurious behaviors in laboratory rhesus macaques

    Contributor(s):: Polanco, Andrea

    Self-injurious behaviors (SIBs) are a welfare and practical concern in laboratory rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), and may share a similar etiology to human SIBs. This review uses a Tinbergian perspective to investigate why rhesus monkeys perform SIBs. In addition to reviewing research...

  8. Training success in group-housed long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) is better explained by personality than by social rank

    Contributor(s):: Wergård, Eva-Marie, Westlund, Karolina, Spångberg, Mats, Fredlund, Helene, Forkman, Björn

    Using training to prepare laboratory animals for biomedical research is one important behavior management task. With increased knowledge about factors influencing training success, training programs may be optimized, resulting in a refinement of primate husbandry. Even when animals are trained...

  9. Risky business: Causes and conservation implications of human-moor macaque (macaca maura) interactions in south Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Kristen Morrow

    Human and nonhuman primates (primates, hereafter) interact with one another in diverse ways. Although the nature of these interactions has been well documented, we still have limited insight as to why humans and primates interact in the patterns we observe. Drawing from life history theory,...

  10. Keeper-animal interactions: differences between the behaviour of zoo animals affect stockmanship

    | Contributor(s):: Ward, S. J., Melfi, V.

    Stockmanship is a term used to describe the management of animals with a good stockperson someone who does this in a in a safe, effective, and low-stress manner for both the stock-keeper and animals involved. Although impacts of unfamiliar zoo visitors on animal behaviour have been extensively...

  11. Training success in group-housed long-tailed macaques ( Macaca fascicularis) is better explained by personality than by social rank

    | Contributor(s):: Wergard, E. M., Westlund, K., Spangberg, M., Fredlund, H., Forkman, B.

    Using training to prepare laboratory animals for biomedical research is one important behavior management task. With increased knowledge about factors influencing training success, training programs may be optimized, resulting in a refinement of primate husbandry. Even when animals are trained...

  12. The Human Intruder Test: An Anxiety Assessment in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca Mulatta)

    | Contributor(s):: Emily J. Peterson

    The human intruder test (HIT) is a noninvasive tool widely used for assessing anxiety in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). This thesis explores the HIT procedure and applies it to a population of monkeys with a self-injurious behavioral pathology. Individual variation on this test can be used to...

  13. Evaluation of environmental and intrinsic factors that contribute to stereotypic behavior in captive rhesus macaques ( Macaca mulatta)

    | Contributor(s):: Gottlieb, D. H., Maier, A., Coleman, K.

    Full body repetitive behaviors, known as motor stereotypic behaviors (MSBs), are one of the most commonly seen abnormal behaviors in captive non-human primates, and are frequently used as a behavioral measure of well-being. The main goal of this paper was to examine the role of environmental...

  14. Chinese visitors' experiences of nature and wild macaques: inspiration and personal growth for living in Hong Kong

    | Contributor(s):: Lee, WingNaam, Davey, G.

    Country parks offer urban residents the opportunity to experience wildlife, engage in environmental education, and socially bond with family and friends, but little is known about these experiences in China. Twenty-five interviews were conducted in 2012 to investigate the meanings Hong Kong...

  15. Refinement of welfare through development of a quantitative system for assessment of lifetime experience

    | Contributor(s):: Wolfensohn, S., Sharpe, S., Hall, I., Lawrence, S., Kitchen, S., Dennis, M.

    This paper proposes a system that uses intrinsic study data to provide a clear visualisation of the stresses involved during the animal's life history that can be applied to all types of studies, even those not requiring invasive techniques. Thus, it provides an opportunity for researchers to...

  16. Detection of antibodies to selected human pathogens among wild and pet macaques (Macaca tonkeana) in Sulawesi, Indonesia

    | Contributor(s):: Jones-Engel, Lisa

  17. Naturalcultural encounters in Bali: monkeys, temples, tourists, and ethnoprimatology

    | Contributor(s):: Fuentes, Augustín

  18. Synanthropic primates in Asia : potential sentinels for environmental toxins

    | Contributor(s):: Engel, Gregory

  19. Social housing of non-human primates in a research facility: socialisation across macaque species and sexes

    | Contributor(s):: Rehrig, A., DiVincenti, L., Jr., Schery, L. A.

    Refinement of social housing practices is paramount to improving animal welfare in laboratory environments, especially with regard to non-human primates. Even though social housing of the same species should be considered the optimal paradigm, cynomolgus ( Macaca fascicularis) and rhesus macaques...

  20. Bioacoustic monitoring of aggression in group-housed rhesus macaques

    | Contributor(s):: McCowan, B., Rommeck, I.

    Many captive primate facilities house rhesus macaques in multimale-multifemale social groups in large enclosures that simulate the natural social and environmental features characteristic of the species, enhancing their reproductive performance as well as their psychological well-being, yet one...