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  1. Working with laboratory rodents in Spain: a survey on welfare and wellbeing

    Contributor(s):: Goni-Balentziaga, O., Ortega-Saez, I., Vila, S., Azkona, G.

  2. Pets, Purity and Pollution: Why Conventional Models of Disease Transmission Do Not Work for Pet Rat Owners

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Charlotte Robin, Elizabeth Perkins, Francine Watkins, Robert Christley

    In the United Kingdom, following the emergence of Seoul hantavirus in pet rat owners in 2012, public health authorities tried to communicate the risk of this zoonotic disease, but had limited success. To explore this lack of engagement with health advice, we conducted in-depth, semi-structured...

  3. ANIMAL-ASSISTED ACTIVITIES: Effects of Animals on Positive Emotional Display in Children in Inclusion Classrooms

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Gayatri Mazgaonkar

    Animals are commonly present in classrooms and may be an important tool in enhancing children’s experiences, especially in inclusion classrooms that provide integrative learning for both typically developing children and children with special needs. The purpose of this study was to...

  4. Tickling Rats: Differential Benefits for Pet Store Rats

    | Contributor(s):: Whitney Blankenberger

    Animal welfare and the effects of the human-animal bond are becoming increasingly important to researchers and the public. Animal use in biomedical research is indispensable and inevitably creates stressful situations for the animals. One way to mediate this stress and improve rat welfare is by...

  5. To Group or Not to Group? Good Practice for Housing Male Laboratory Mice

    | Contributor(s):: Sarah Kappel, Penny Hawkins, Michael T. Mendl

    It is widely recommended to group-house male laboratory mice because they are ‘social animals’, but male mice do not naturally share territories and aggression can be a serious welfare problem. Even without aggression, not all animals within a group will be in a state of positive...

  6. The Human-Animal Interaction Scale: development and evaluation

    | Contributor(s):: Fournier, A. K., Berry, T. D., Letson, E., Chanen, R.

    The purpose of this study was to develop the Human–Animal Interaction Scale (HAIS) and evaluate its reliability and validity. The HAIS is a 24-item self-report instrument designed to describe and quantify behaviors performed by humans and nonhuman animals during an episode of interaction...

  7. ExNOTic: Should We Be Keeping Exotic Pets?

    | Contributor(s):: Rachel A Grant, V Tamara Montrose, Alison P Wills

    There has been a recent trend towards keeping non-traditional companion animals, also known as exotic pets. These pets include parrots, reptiles, amphibians and rabbits, as well as small species of rodent such as degus and guinea pigs. Many of these exotic pet species are not domesticated, and...

  8. An Investigation into the Relationship between Owner Knowledge, Diet, and Dental Disease in Guinea Pigs (Cavia porcellus)

    | Contributor(s):: Rosemary Norman, Alison P. Wills

  9. Of Mice, Birds, and Men: The Mouse Ultrasonic Song System Has Some Features Similar to Humans and Song-Learning Birds

    | Contributor(s):: Gustavo Arriaga, Eric P. Zhou, Erich D. Jarvis

    Humans and song-learning birds communicate acoustically using learned vocalizations. The characteristic features of this social communication behavior include vocal control by forebrain motor areas, a direct cortical projection to brainstem vocal motor neurons, and dependence on auditory feedback...

  10. Individual hunting behaviour and prey specialisation in the house cat Felis catus: implications for conservation and management

    | Contributor(s):: Dickman, C. R., Newsome, T. M.

    Predators are often classed as prey specialists if they eat a narrow range of prey types, or as generalists if they hunt multiple prey types. Yet, individual predators often exhibit sex, size, age or personality-related differences in their diets that may alter the impacts of predation on...

  11. Social support does not require attachment: any conspecific tranquilizes isolated guinea-pig pups

    | Contributor(s):: Tokumaru, R. S., Ades, C., Monticelli, P. F.

    Guinea pig pups produce typical distress whistles when isolated. Whistles' frequency is decreased or abolished when they contact with the mother and, to a lesser degree, a sibling or even an unfamiliar female, is regained. Those non-aggressive companions were considered social support providers...

  12. The effect of isoflurane anaesthesia and buprenorphine on the mouse grimace scale and behaviour in CBA and DBA/2 mice

    | Contributor(s):: Miller, A., Kitson, G., Skalkoyannis, B., Leach, M.

    Prevention or alleviation of pain in laboratory mice is a fundamental requirement of in vivo research. The mouse grimace scale (MGS) has the potential to be an effective and rapid means of assessing pain and analgesic efficacy in laboratory mice. Preliminary studies have demonstrated its...

  13. Evaluation of a novel rodenticide: acute sub-lethal effects of a methaemoglobin-inducing agent

    | Contributor(s):: Quy, R. J., Gibson, T. J., Lambert, M. S., Eason, C. T., Gregory, N. G.

    In a series of experiments the welfare of para-aminovalerophenone (PAVP) sub-lethally poisoned rats ( Rattus norvegicus) was assessed. The experiments: (i) examined the acute methaemoglobin (MetHb) profile over time; (ii) refined the LD50 estimate for PAVP in adult female rats; (iii) developed...

  14. Evaluation of a novel rodenticide: welfare assessment of fatal methaemoglobinaemia in adult rats ( Rattus norvegicus)

    | Contributor(s):: Gibson, T. J., Quy, R. J., Eason, C. T., Gregory, N. G.

    This study assessed the welfare of rats ( Rattus norvegicus) poisoned with a lethal dose of the methaemoglobin (MetHb) inducing compound para-aminovalerophenone (PAVP). Twenty rats were orally gavaged with either PAVP (treated) or the vehicle only (control). Spontaneous and evoked behaviours were...

  15. Stereotypic mice are aggressed by their cage-mates, and tend to be poor demonstrators in social learning tasks

    | Contributor(s):: Harper, L., Choleris, E., Ervin, K., Fureix, C., Reynolds, K., Walker, M., Mason, G.

    Stereotypic behaviours (SBs) are linked with behavioural inflexibility and resemble symptoms of autism, suggesting that stereotypic animals could have autistic-like social impairments. SBs are also common in caged mice. We therefore hypothesised relationships between stereotypic and social...

  16. Antimony: The Use, Rights, and Regulation of Laboratory Animals

    | Contributor(s):: Brenda L. Thomas

    'In recent years, the problem, plight, and philosophy behind the use of animals in laboratories, schools, and industries has caused many to formulate an opinion on animal experimentation. It is simple to postulate a Monday morning quarterback philosophy - merely weigh the...

  17. Laboratory Animal Act: A Legislative Proposal

    | Contributor(s):: David Favre

    In one recent experiment, mongrel dogs were anesthetized after which thirty-five percent of their body was burned to the third degree by the application of a two hundred degree centigrade hot plate to their skin.' In 1983, researchers at the New Jersey Medical School...

  18. Reinforcement for Operational Mine Detection Rats

    | Contributor(s):: Amanda Mahoney, Christophe Cox, Bart Weetjens, Tess Tewelde, Tekimiti Gilbert, Amy Durgin, Alan Poling

    When using animals for the detection of landmines, handlers face challenges of when to reinforce indication responses, as the actual location of landmines in the field is unknown. Anti-Persoonsmijnen Ontmijnende Product Ontwikkeling(Anti-Personnel Landmine Detection Product Development or APOPO)...

  19. Research in Colombia on Explosives Detection by Rats

    | Contributor(s):: Luisa Fernando Mendez Pardo, Andres M. Perez-Acosta

    The interdisciplinary research group INVESTUD is investigating the effectiveness of mine-detecting lab rats. In Africa, the APOPO program is well-known for using African giant pouched rats for mine detection, but INVESTUD hopes to build on and even surpass APOPO’s progress to advance...

  20. Two Strategies for Landmine Detection by Giant Pouched Rats

    | Contributor(s):: Alan Poling, Christophe Cox, Bart Weetjens, Negussie Beyene, Andrew Sully

    This article compares the performance of Giant African Pouched Rats under two different management systems, both appropriate for mine-detection operational use. Employing International Mine Action Standards for accreditation, the researchers outline the process of conditioning and testing these...