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  1. Contexts and consequences of dog bite incidents

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: James Andrew Oxley, Rob Christley, Carri Westgarth

    Dog bites are a contentious issue within the United Kingdom due to their effect on public health and increasing incidence. Despite multiple expert-led dog bite prevention schemes being available, there is limited evidence regarding the surrounding factors and likely causes of a dog bite (e.g.,...

  2. Evaluation of an open source method for calculating physical activity in dogs from harness and collar based sensors

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Carri Westgarth, C. Ladha

    Background: The ability to make objective measurements of physical activity in dogs has both clinical and research applications. Accelerometers offer a non-intrusive and convenient solution. Of the commercialy available sensors, measurements are commonly given in manufacturer bespoke units and...

  3. How many people have been bitten by dogs? A cross-sectional survey of prevalence, incidence and factors associated with dog bites in a UK community

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Carri Westgarth, Megan Brooke, Robert M Christley

    Background Dog bite studies are typically based on hospital records and may be biased towards bites requiring significant medical treatment. This study investigated true dog bite prevalence and incidence at a community-level and victim-related risk factors, in order to inform policy and...

  4. Portion size and meal consumption in domesticated dogs: An experimental study

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Inge Kersbergen, Alexander J. German, Carri Westgarth, Eric Robinson

    Increases in food portion sizes have been identified as a possible contributor to the increased prevalence of obesity in humans. However, little is known about the origin of behavioural tendencies to overeat from larger portion sizes or whether other non-human animals are affected by meal...

  5. Dog owners are more likely to meet physical activity guidelines than people without a dog: An investigation of the association between dog ownership and physical activity levels in a UK community

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Carri Westgarth, Robert M. Christley, Christopher Jewell, Alexander J.German, Lynne M. Boddy, Hayley E. Christian

    Previous research suggests that dog owners are slightly more physically active than those without dogs, but have only studied one household member, and it is unclear whether time spent dog walking replaces other physical activity (PA). A survey of 191 dog owning adults (DO), 455 non-dog owning...

  6. Evidence of large genetic influences on dog ownership in the Swedish Twin Registry has implications for understanding domestication and health associations

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Tove Fall, Ralf Kuja-Halkola, Keith Dobney, Carri Westgarth, Patrik K. E. Magnusson

    Dogs were the first domesticated animal and, according to the archaeological evidence, have had a close relationship with humans for at least 15,000 years. Today, dogs are common pets in our society and have been linked to increased well-being and improved health outcomes in their owners. A dog...

  7. Integrated Return-To-Field and Targeted Trap-Neuter-Vaccinate-Return Programs Result in Reductions of Feline Intake and Euthanasia at Six Municipal Animal Shelters

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Daniel D. Spehar, Peter J. Wolf

    For decades, animal shelters in the U.S. have sought to reduce the number of cats that are impounded and euthanized. Since the 1990s, low-cost sterilization campaigns aimed at owned cats have achieved varying levels of success in meeting these objectives. Over a similar time period, the use of...

  8. Effective Multidisciplinary Search Strategies for Assistance Animals: A Librarian's Perspective

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Erik Davis Fausak

    Successful search strategies are based on good background knowledge and a focused clinical research question. Due to the multidisciplinary nature of research involving assistance animals means there is no one universal database to answer all research questions. The topic of assistance animals...

  9. Cat Colony Caretakers' Perceptions of Support and Opposition to TNR

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jacquie Rand, Andrea Hayward, Kuan Tan

    Trap, neuter and return (TNR) is a non-lethal approach to urban cat management used effectively internationally to decrease urban cat numbers, but deemed illegal in Australia. We investigated perceived support and opposition to TNR experienced by respondents involved in TNR activities, as...

  10. Zoo visitor effect on mammal behaviour: Does noise matter?

    | Contributor(s):: Quadros, Sandra, Goulart, Vinicius D. L., Passos, Luiza, Vecci, Marco A. M., Young, Robert J.

    The zoo visitor effect is the change in animal behaviour and physiology in response to the presence of a viewing public. It is thought to result from, amongst other things, visitor generated sound (i.e., noise), but this hypothesis has never been explicitly tested. We tested this hypothesis...

  11. Dog walking among adolescents: Correlates and contribution to physical activity.

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jessa K. Engelberg, Jordan A. Carlson, Terry L. Conway, Kelli L. Cain, Brian E. Saelens

    PURPOSE: To assess the association of dog walking with adolescents' moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and body mass index (BMI), and identify correlates of dog walking. METHODS/DESIGN: Participants were 12-17year-olds (n=925) from the Baltimore, MD and Seattle, WA regions....

  12. A Preliminary Description of Companion Cat, Managed Stray Cat, and Unmanaged Stray Cat Welfare in Auckland, New Zealand Using a 5-Component Assessment Scale

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sarah Zito, Jessica Walker, M. Carolyn Gates, Arnja Dale

    Free-roaming cats are a polarizing issue in New Zealand and there is strong need for a comprehensive evaluation of their welfare to better inform population management decisions. In this study, a 5-component visual health-related welfare assessment scale was developed and piloted on a...

  13. The Changing Legal Status of Cats in Australia: From Friend of the Settlers, to Enemy of the Rabbit, and Now a Threat to Biodiversity and Biosecurity Risk

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sophie Riley

    In NSW, free-roaming cats are regarded as one the biggest threats to biodiversity. Yet, at one stage they were classified as “the enemy of the rabbit” and were protected and released in their thousands. The purpose of this article is to examine the changing status of cats in...

  14. Dog Movie Stars and Dog Breed Popularity: A Case Study in Media Influence on Choice

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Stefano Ghirlanda, Alberto Acerbi, Harold Herzog

    Fashions and fads are important phenomena that influence many individual choices. They are ubiquitous in human societies, and have recently been used as a source of data to test models of cultural dynamics. Although a few statistical regularities have been observed in fashion cycles, their...

  15. Evaluation of Unowned Domestic Cat Management in the Urban Environment of Rome After 30 Years of Implementation of the No-Kill Policy (National and Regional Laws)

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Eugenia Natoli, Livia Malandrucco, Laura Minati, Stefania Verzichi, Raffaella Perino, Laura Longo, Francesca Pontecorvo, Anna Faini

    Law no. 281, enacted by the Italian Parliament in 1991, was the first that aimed at managing urban free-roaming cats living in colonies, without killing and/or moving them from their site. It had been anticipated by the Lazio Regional Law no. 63/1988 and subsequently refined by the Lazio...

  16. Public Opinions on Strategies for Managing Stray Cats and Predictors of Opposition to Trap-Neuter and Return in Brisbane, Australia

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jacquie Rand, Gina Fisher, Kate Lamb, Andrea Hayward

    A survey of Brisbane residents was undertaken to investigate community attitudes toward urban stray cats and their management. Surveys were distributed to 84 medical and dental practices across Brisbane City, and were completed by 305 patients and staff. Practices were targeted to achieve a...

  17. Food Preferences in Dogs: Effect of Dietary Composition and Intrinsic Variables on Diet Selection

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Raúl A. Alegría-Morán, Sergio A. Guzmán-Pino, Juan Ignacio Egaña, Carem Muñoz, Jaime Figueroa

    A ten-year food preference database (2007–2017) was used to relate food selection in dogs to the nutritional components of diets by doing a principal component analysis (PCA) and a linear regression between components obtained and dogs’ preferences. Intake and preference of...

  18. Papillomavirus DNA is not Amplifiable from Bladder, Lung, or Mammary Gland Cancers in Dogs or Cats

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: John S. Munday, Chloe B. MacLachlan, Matthew R. Perrott, Danielle Aberdein

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) cause around 5% of all human cancers, including most cervical cancers and around a quarter of all oral cancers. Additionally, some studies have suggested that PVs could cause a proportion of human lung, breast, and bladder cancers. As PVs have been associated with skin...

  19. Behavioral Interventions as an Adjunctive Treatment for Canine Epilepsy: A Missing Part of the Epilepsy Management Toolkit?

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Rowena M. A. Packer, Sarah L. Hobbs, Emily J. Blackwell

    Epilepsy is a common, complex and often challenging neurological disorder to treat in the dog, with 20–30% of dogs resistant to conventional medical therapies, and associated with cognitive and behavioral comorbidities and early death. Behavioral interventions are an emerging area of...

  20. Decrease in Population and Increase in Welfare of Community Cats in a Twenty-Three Year Trap-Neuter-Return Program in Key Largo, FL: The ORCAT Program

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Rachael E. Kreisler, Heather N. Cornell, Julie K. Levy

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a long-term (23-year) trapneuter-return program on the population size of community cats in the Ocean Reef Community and to describe the demographic composition and outcome of enrolled cats. A retrospective study was performed using both...