The HABRI Central Team continues to monitor emerging research and information about the COVID-19 pandemic. Visit our collection of resources, https://habricentral.org/features/covid-19 close

 
You are here: Home / Tags / mink / All Categories

Tags: mink

All Categories (1-20 of 64)

  1. Who's afraid of the big bad glove? Testing for fear and its correlates in mink

    Contributor(s):: Meagher, Rebecca K., Duncan, Ian, Bechard, Allison, Mason, Georgia J.

    Fear in farm animals is a welfare and economic concern. For Scandinavian mink, the “stick test” is common for assessing fearfulness: a spatula is inserted into the cage and minks’ immediate responses are noted. However, on Ontario farms, fearfulness in the stick test was very rare and aggressive...

  2. Feed restriction and tubes for environmental enrichment in growing mink—Consequences for behaviour and welfare

    Contributor(s):: Hansen, Steffen Werner, Møller, Steen Henrik, Damgaard, Birthe Marie

    This experiment compared the behaviour of mink during two different feeding routines; slightly restrictive (‘food free period’ of 6h) or standard (‘food free period’ of 2h), respectively, and the mink's use of two different types of occupational material; an attached tube made of wire mesh and a...

  3. Effects of access to extra cage constructions including a swimming opportunity on the development of stereotypic behaviour in singly housed juvenile farmed mink (Neovison vison)

    Contributor(s):: Ahola, Leena, Mononen, Jaakko, Mohaibes, Maarit

    The aim of the study was to find out whether an access to extra cage constructions including either a 180l pool (SP group) or a pool-sized extra cage (0.61m2) (EC group) would slow down the development of stereotypic behaviour in singly housed farmed mink (Neovison vison). Mink housed in...

  4. Effects of group size on behaviour, growth and occurrence of bite marks in farmed mink

    Contributor(s):: Axelsson, Heléne M. K., Hansen, Steffen W., Loberg, Jenny, Lidfors, Lena

    The aims of this study were to investigate the occurrence of stereotypic behaviours and the activity level in farmed mink when group housed in climbing cages and if group housing increase aggression by assessing the prevalence of bite marks. This was studied in juvenile mink of the colour types...

  5. Environmentally enriching American mink ( Neovison vison) increases lymphoid organ weight and skeletal symmetry, and reveals differences between two sub-types of stereotypic behaviour

    Contributor(s):: Diez-Leon, M., Bursian, S., Galicia, D., Napolitano, A., Palme, R., Mason, G.

    Enrichment studies for wild carnivores (e.g., in zoos) are often short-term, use enrichments of unknown motivational significance, and focus on glucocorticoids and stereotypic behaviour (SB), ignoring other stress-relevant variables. Our study assessed the broad behavioural and physiological...

  6. Workaholic ferrets: does a two-chamber consumer demand study give insight in the preferences of laboratory ferrets ( Mustela putorius furo)?

    Contributor(s):: Reijgwart, M. L., Vinke, C. M., Hendriksen, C. F. M., Meer, M. van der, Schoemaker, N. J., Zeeland, Y. R. A. van

    Although provision of environmental enrichment is an effective tool to refine laboratory animal experiments, it is currently unknown which enrichments ferrets prefer. This study aimed to assess the suitability of a closed economy, two-chamber consumer demand set-up to determine ferrets'...

  7. Early transfer of mated females into the maternity unit reduces stress and increases maternal care in farm mink

    Contributor(s):: Malmkvist, J., Palme, R.

    Mated mammals on farms are typically transferred to another housing environment prior to delivery. We investigated whether the timing of this transfer - EARLY (Day -36), INTERMEDIATE (Day -18), or LATE (Day -3) relative to the expected day of birth (Day 0) - affects maternal stress, maternal care...

  8. The reliability of welfare assessment according to the WelFur-protocol in the nursing period of mink (Neovison vison) is challenged by increasing welfare problems prior to weaning

    Contributor(s):: Henriksen, B. I. F., Moller, S. H.

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the body condition of the mink dam, the frequency of dirty nests, frequency of injuries and diarrhoea change significantly with the day of assessment, post-partum, within the data collection period from parturition to weaning,...

  9. Are you treating all creatures great and small?

    Contributor(s):: Cope, I.

    The exotic pet turning up in the waiting room of the local practice is a growing trend. Their owners expect veterinarians to be able to see and triage most species, but is this a fair expectation? Should vets be able to see and treat all creatures great and small or are those days of James...

  10. Less common house pets

    Contributor(s):: Chomel, B. B., Schlossberg, D.

    This chapter focuses on the major health threats associated with exposure of humans to less common house pets. The viral, bacterial, parasitic and mycotic zoonoses transmitted by pet rabbits, rodents, reptiles, amphibians, ornamental aquarium fish, ferrets, bats and nonhuman primates are...

  11. Bite marks in mink-induced experimentally and as reflection of aggressive encounters between mink

    Contributor(s):: Hansen, S. W., Moller, S. H., Damgaard, B. M.

    For many years, bite marks have been used as an indicator for aggression in mink production systems. However, the validity of bite marks as indicator of aggression has recently been questioned. We therefore tested the following hypotheses: (1) experimentally applied pressure to, or penetration...

  12. Additional foraging elements reduce abnormal behaviour - fur-chewing and stereotypic behaviour - in farmed mink ( Neovison vison)

    Contributor(s):: Malmkvist, J., Palme, R., Svendsen, P. M., Hansen, S. W.

    We investigated whether provision of additional appetitive and consummatory elements of foraging reduces baseline stress and abnormal behaviour - in terms of fur-chewing and stereotypic behaviour - in farmed mink. We studied 200 juveniles ( n=100 females and 100 males) during the 5-month growth...

  13. Effect of captivity and management on behaviour of the domestic ferret ( Mustela putorius furo)

    Contributor(s):: Talbot, S., Freire, R., Wassens, S.

    The domestic ferret ( Mustela putorius furo) is becoming an increasingly popular companion animal in Australia and overseas yet very little is currently known about the effects of different management factors (such as housing and enrichment) on domestic ferret behaviour and welfare. Hence, the...

  14. Insurance for household animals and its application to enlightening of preventive veterinary medicine - how insurance can support the human-animal bond?

    Contributor(s):: Kawarai, A.

    Anicom has acquired the license of operating "Animal health insurance" from the Financial Services Agency and has now been issued the insurance policies to more than 430 thousands animals (89% dogs, 10% cats, and 1% birds/rabbits/ferrets) as at December, 2012. When animals are registered to...

  15. Welfare of non-traditional pets

    Contributor(s):: Schuppli, C. A., Fraser, D., Bacon, H. J.

    The keeping of non-traditional or 'exotic' pets has been growing in popularity worldwide. In addition to the typical welfare challenges of keeping more traditional pet species like dogs and cats, ensuring the welfare of non-traditional pets is complicated by factors such as lack of knowledge,...

  16. Novelty exploration, baseline cortisol level and fur-chewing in farm mink with different intensities of stereotypic behaviour

    Contributor(s):: Svendsen, P. M., Palme, R., Malmkvist, J.

  17. Pet travel changes - good for owners... but what about pets?

    Contributor(s):: Cooper, E.

  18. Providing 'get-away bunks' and other enrichments to primiparous adult female mink improves their reproductive productivity

    Contributor(s):: Buob, M., Meagher, R., Dawson, L., Palme, R., Haley, D., Mason, G.

  19. Providing elevated 'getaway bunks' to nursing mink dams improves their health and welfare

    Contributor(s):: Dawson, L., Buob, M., Haley, D., Miller, S., Stryker, J., Quinton, M., Mason, G.

  20. Sleeping tight or hiding in fright? The welfare implications of different subtypes of inactivity in mink

    Contributor(s):: Meagher, R. K., Campbell, D. L. M., Dallaire, J. A., Diez-Leon, M., Palme, R., Mason, G. J.