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  1. A brief note on the effects of the removal of individuals on social behaviour in a captive group of campbell's monkeys ( Cercopithecus campbelli campbelli ): a case study

    Contributor(s):: Lemasson, A., Gautier, J. P., Hausberger, M.

    We investigated the social effects of the removal of two adult females, including the founder of a matriline, in a group of captive Campbell's monkeys (Cercopithecus campbelli campbelli). Their social behaviour was recorded 1 month before, 1 week after, and 7 months after the removal of the...

  2. A comparison of cell-mediated immune responses in rhesus macaques housed singly, in pairs, or in groups

    Contributor(s):: Schapiro, S. J., Nehete, P. N., Perlman, J. E., Sastry, K. J.

    A variety of psychosocial factors have been shown to influence immunological responses in laboratory primates. The present investigation examined the effects of social housing condition on cell-mediated immune responses, comparing rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in three housing conditions...

  3. A note on indoor and outdoor housing preferences of common marmosets ( Callithrix jacchus )

    Contributor(s):: Pines, M. K., Kaplan, G., Rogers, L. J.

    This study examined the preferences of six pairs of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) from the colony at the University of New England, Australia, between their home cage and either a large, enriched, indoor room or a smaller outdoor cage. When given free access to move between their home...

  4. A two-choice preference assessment with five cotton-top tamarins ( Saguinus oedipus )

    Contributor(s):: Fernandez, E. J., Dorey, N. R., Rosales-Ruiz, J.

    A study selected 5 cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus) located at the Frank Buck Zoo in Gainesville, Texas, for a food preference assessment. The study used a paired-choice procedure across 7 different food items for all 5 tamarins. Preferences for the food items across all the tamarins...

  5. Abnormal behaviour in captive sooty mangabeys

    Contributor(s):: Crast, J., Bloomsmith, M. A., Perlman, J. E., Meeker, T. L., Remillard, C. M.

    The influence of several factors on abnormal behaviour was investigated in 46 singly housed sooty mangabeys ( Cercocebus atys) (eight nursery-reared, 38 mother-reared), including self-injurious, self-directed, stereotypic locomotion, and faeces/urine-related behaviours (SIB, SDB, SL, FUR,...

  6. Allowing captive marmosets to choose the size and position of their nest box

    Contributor(s):: Hosey, G. R., Jacques, M., Burton, M.

    Preferences for nest box size and position were tested in two groups of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus jacchus). One group consisted of a mother, her two adult sons and one adult daughter, and the other comprised a breeding pair, their two adult sons and two adult daughters. In a pre-test...

  7. An evaluation of the suitability of contraceptive methods in golden-headed lion tamarins ( Leontopithecus chrysomelas ), with emphasis on melengestrol acetate (MGA) implants: (II) endocrinological and behavioural effects

    Contributor(s):: Vleeschouwer, K. de, Elsacker, L. van, Heistermann, M., Leus, K.

    In order to be suitable, a contraceptive method should have little or no effects on social organization or behaviour. In callitrichids, changes in socio-sexual interactions between group members, due to hormonal changes induced by contraception, may have consequences for the reproductive...

  8. An example of a monkey assistance program: P.A.S.T. - the French project of simian help to quadriplegics: a response to Lannuzzi and Rowan's (1991) paper on ethical issues in animal-assisted therapy programs

    Contributor(s):: Deputte, B. L., Busnel, M.

    All animal-assisted therapy programs raise ethical issues. These ethical issues are even more important when non-domesticated animals are used to help humans with disabilities. In their 1991 review, Iannuzzi and Rowan mentioned programs which use capuchin monkeys to help quadriplegics. The lack...

  9. Artificial colour treatment mediates aggression among unfamiliar vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops): a model for introducing primates with colourful sexual skin

    Contributor(s):: Gerald, M. S., Weiss, A., Ayala, J. E.

  10. Behavioral differences between provisioned and non-provisioned Barbary macaques ( Macaca sylvanus )

    Contributor(s):: Unwin, T., Smith, A.

    The majority of Gibraltar's Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus) are provided with fruit and vegetable rations to keep them in the nature reserve and away from town. Recent fissioning of one troop has created a vagrant group that is denied access to official feeding sites by other troops, and which...

  11. Bioacoustic monitoring of aggression in group-housed rhesus macaques

    Contributor(s):: McCowan, B., Rommeck, I.

    Many captive primate facilities house rhesus macaques in multimale-multifemale social groups in large enclosures that simulate the natural social and environmental features characteristic of the species, enhancing their reproductive performance as well as their psychological well-being, yet one...

  12. Cage use and feeding height preferences of captive common marmosets ( Callithrix j. jacchus ) in two-tier cages

    Contributor(s):: Buchanan-Smith, H. M., Shand, C., Morris, K.

    Determining appropriate feeding regimes has important welfare implications for captive primates. This study examined the preference of food bowl heights in 6 pairs of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) housed in a 2-tier cage system. Given that marmosets are arboreal and spend most of their...

  13. Cognitive bias as an indicator of animal emotion and welfare: emerging evidence and underlying mechanisms. (Special Issue: Animal suffering and welfare.)

    Contributor(s):: Mendl, M., Burman, O. H. P., Parker, R. M. A., Paul, E. S.

    Accurate assessment of animal emotion (affect) is an important goal in animal welfare science, and in areas such as neuroscience and psychopharmacology. Direct measures of conscious emotion are not available, so assessment of animal affect has relied on measures of the behavioural and...

  14. Comparison of the behaviour of captive white-faced capuchin monkeys ( Cebus capucinus ) in the presence of four kinds of deep litter

    Contributor(s):: Ludes, E., Anderson, J. R.

    Captive white-faced capuchin monkeys (Cebus capucinus) were placed in a large indoor room without or with deep litter made of wood chips, dried ground maize cob, wood wool or garden peat. Feed was scattered on the bare floor or on the litter and the behaviour of the monkeys was observed. When...

  15. Coping strategies in captive capuchin monkeys ( Sapajus spp.)

    Contributor(s):: Ferreira, R. G., Mendl, M., Wagner, P. G. C., Araujo, T., Nunes, D., Mafra, A. L.

    Studies on diverse species indicate the existence of individual differences in stress coping strategies labelled as 'proactive' and 'reactive'. Identifying taxonomic distribution of such coping strategies is fundamental to evolutionary models and to management of captive animals. Capuchin monkeys...

  16. Correlates of self-directed and stereotypic behaviours in captive red-capped mangabeys ( Cercocebus torquatus torquatus )

    Contributor(s):: Reamer, L., Tooze, Z., Coulson, C., Semple, S.

    The quantification of behaviours linked to anxiety or stress provides a powerful means to address applied questions related to the well-being of captive animals. This study explored correlates of two such behaviours - self-directed (SDB) and stereotypic behaviour (STB) - among captive red-capped...

  17. Determining the value of social companionship to captive tufted capuchin monkeys ( Cebus apella )

    Contributor(s):: Dettmer, E., Fragaszy, D.

    The objective of the study is to assess the magnitude of the psychological need for social companionship in pair-housed tufted capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) (six males and 1 female). The classification of commodities as necessities or luxuries are included. The study directly compared the...

  18. Effects of positive interaction with caretakers on the behaviour of socially housed common marmosets ( Callithrix jacchus )

    Contributor(s):: Manciocco, A., Chiarotti, F., Vitale, A.

    Every aspect of the life of the captive non-human primates should be carefully attended to, as updated refinement concept recommends. Interaction with humans as environmental enrichment for these animals is believed to be of value, but it has been subject to little quantitative evaluation. This...

  19. Effects of single-use and group-use enrichment on stereotypy and intragroup aggressive and affiliative behaviors of a social group of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) at the Singapore Zoo

    Contributor(s):: Sha, J., Han, S., Marlena, D., Kee, J.

    Four food-based enrichment devices were used to test the effects of single-use and group-use enrichment devices on stereotypy, intragroup aggression, and affiliation in a compatible group of 5 squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus). All enrichment devices were found to reduce overall stereotypic...

  20. Effects of training on stress-related behavior of the common marmoset ( Callithrix jacchus ) in relation to coping with routine husbandry procedures. (Training Nonhuman Primates Using Positive Reinforcement Techniques)

    Contributor(s):: Bassett, L., Buchanan-Smith, H. M., McKinley, J., Smith, T. E.

    Using positive reinforcement, 12 common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were trained to provide urine samples on request. The marmosets were exposed to mildly stressful, routine husbandry procedures (i.e., capture and weighing). The non-human animals spent less time inactive poststressor as...