You are here: Home / Tags / Monkeys / Journal Articles

Tags: Monkeys

Resources (41-60 of 159)

  1. Severe intragroup aggressions in captive common marmosets ( Callithrix jacchus )

    Contributor(s):: Filippis, B. de, Chiarotti, F., Vitale, A.

    Members of captive colonies of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus), a small New World primate, can occasionally be victims of repeated, and potentially fatal, attacks by a family-mate. This study examined the records of a colony, looking for past instances of such aggressions. The aim was to...

  2. The role of zoos in the rehabilitation of animals in the circus

    Contributor(s):: Gupta, B. K., Bipul, Chakraborty

    In 1998, the government of India enforced a ban on performance/exhibition of 5 species of nonhuman animals: (a) lions, (b) tigers, (c) leopards, (d) bears, and (e) monkeys. The Ministry of Environment and Forests gave the responsibility to the Central Zoo Authority (CZA) for rehabilitation of...

  3. Possible costs of radio-tracking a young adult female mantled howler monkey ( Alouatta palliata ) in deciduous habitat of Costa Rican tropical dry forest

    Contributor(s):: Hilpert, A. L., Jones, C. B.

    Field experiments are required to determine the causes of the patterns identified in this report and their potential threats to the internal validity of field studies on mantled howlers. The literature on biotelemetry suggests that radio collars are likely to have deleterious effects on animals...

  4. Use of enclosure space by captive lion-tailed macaques ( Macaca silenus ) housed in Indian zoos

    Contributor(s):: Avanti, Mallapur, Waran, N., Anindya, Sinha

    Captive nonhuman animals use enclosure space differentially. Enclosure features strongly influence this. This study recorded both the enclosure space used by 47 captive lion-tailed macaques housed in 13 zoos across India and the behaviour of the macaques. The exhibition of abnormal behaviors,...

  5. Hunting restraint by Creoles at the Community Baboon Sanctuary, Belize: a preliminary survey

    Contributor(s):: Jones, C. B., Young, J.

    This study surveyed 33 male hunters between the ages of 17 and 54 years at the Community Baboon Sanctuary (CBS), Belize, to evaluate attitudes and behaviours in relation to hunting black howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra). The study defined hunting restraint as a learned predisposition not to hunt 1...

  6. Overcoming the barriers to the retirement of Old and New World monkeys from research facilities

    Contributor(s):: Kerwin, A. M.

    In this commentary I aim to raise awareness among researchers and sanctuary directors to potential barriers to retiring Old and New World monkeys from research facilities. I define a barrier as an opinion or stereotype that prevents primate retirement from occurring on a regular basis. By...

  7. Primate location preference in a double-tier cage: the effects of illumination and cage height

    Contributor(s):: Maclean, E. L., Prior, S. R., Platt, M. L., Brannon, E. M.

    Nonhuman primates are frequently housed in double-tier arrangements with significant differences between the environments of the upper and lower-row cages. Although several studies have investigated whether this arrangement alters monkeys' behavior, no studies have addressed the two most notable...

  8. Bioacoustic monitoring of aggression in group-housed rhesus macaques

    Contributor(s):: McCowan, B., Rommeck, I.

    Many captive primate facilities house rhesus macaques in multimale-multifemale social groups in large enclosures that simulate the natural social and environmental features characteristic of the species, enhancing their reproductive performance as well as their psychological well-being, yet one...

  9. Training common marmosets ( Callithrix jacchus ) to cooperate during routine laboratory procedures: ease of training and time investment. (Training Nonhuman Primates Using Positive Reinforcement Techniques)

    Contributor(s):: McKinley, J., Buchanan-Smith, H. M., Bassett, L., Morris, K.

    The first author trained 12 laboratory-housed common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) in pairs to assess the practicality of positive reinforcement training as a technique in the management of these nonhuman animals. Behaviours taught were target training to allow homecage weighing and providing...

  10. The myth of the aggressive monkey

    Contributor(s):: Reinhardt, V.

    Captive rhesus macaques are not naturally aggressive, but poor husbandry and handling practices can trigger their aggression toward conspecifics and toward the human handler. The myth of the aggressive monkey probably is based on often not taking into account basic ethological principles when...

  11. Artificial weaning of Old World monkeys: benefits and costs

    Contributor(s):: Reinhardt, V.

    Permanent mother-infant separation prior to natural weaning is a common husbandry practice in monkey breeding colonies. In the United States, all eight Regional Primate Research Centres have such colonies. Under undisturbed conditions, Old World monkey mothers wean their infants at the age of...

  12. Working with rather than against macaques during blood collection. (Training Nonhuman Primates Using Positive Reinforcement Techniques)

    Contributor(s):: Reinhardt, V.

    Training macaques to cooperate during blood collection is a practicable and safe alternative to the traditional procedure implying forced restraint. It takes a cumulative total of about 1 hr to train an adult female or adult male rhesus macaque successfully to present a leg voluntarily and accept...

  13. Blood collection procedure of laboratory primates: a neglected variable in biomedical research

    Contributor(s):: Reinhardt, V., Reinhardt, A.

    A survey of 75 biomedical articles dealing with stress-dependent blood parameters ni caged primates revealed that the conditions under which blood collection occurred were in most cases described either not at all or so haphazardly that it would be impossible to determine if humane handling...

  14. The lower row monkey cage: an overlooked variable in biomedical research

    Contributor(s):: Reinhardt, V., Reinhardt, A.

    A survey of 96 primatological articles revealed that cage location of research monkeys is rarely mentioned, although the environment of upper and lower row-housed animals markedly differs in terms of light quality, light intensity, and living dimension. Not accounting for these uncontrolled...

  15. Self-biting in caged macaques: cause, effect, and treatment

    Contributor(s):: Reinhardt, V., Rossell, M.

    Injurious self-biting is one of the most serious problems in primate colonies (Niemeyer, Gray, & Stephen, 1996). "Approximately 10% of captive, individually-housed monkeys engage in the disturbing phenomenon of self-injurious behavior (SIB). To date, no adequate explanation or effective therapy...

  16. Improving the welfare of captive macaques ( Macaca sp.) through the use of water as enrichment

    Contributor(s):: Robins, J. G., Waitt, C. D.

    This review evaluates the use of water as a tool for enriching the environments of macaques (Macaca sp.) in captivity. Many macaque species are known to swim and forage in water in the wild, and in-situ reports suggest that access to water promotes activity and cultural behavior. Yet, there is a...

  17. Risk factors and remediation of self-injurious and self-abuse behavior in rhesus macaques

    Contributor(s):: Rommeck, I., Anderson, K., Heagerty, A., Cameron, A., McCowan, B.

    Considered signs of decreased welfare - abnormal behaviors such as self-injury and self-abuse among nonhuman primates housed in the laboratory - may put into question the validity and reliability of scientific research using these animals as models. Providing environmental enrichment decreases...

  18. The development of an operant conditioning training program for New World primates at the Bronx Zoo. (Training Nonhuman Primates Using Positive Reinforcement Techniques)

    Contributor(s):: Savastano, G., Hanson, A., McCann, C.

    This article described the development of an operant conditioning training programme for 17 species of New World primates at the Bronx Zoo, New York, USA. To apply less invasive techniques to husbandry protocols, the study introduced behaviours such as hand feeding, syringe feeding, targeting,...

  19. Training nonhuman primates to cooperate with scientific procedures in applied biomedical research. (Training Nonhuman Primates Using Positive Reinforcement Techniques)

    Contributor(s):: Scott, L., Pearce, P., Fairhall, S., Muggleton, N., Smith, J.

    This report provides a brief overview of aspects of training nonhuman primates who have been, and continue to be, used in this laboratory. The research context involves applied behavioral studies in which animals are trained to perform complex operant behavioral sequences, often in their homecage...

  20. Positive reinforcement training as a technique to alter nonhuman primate behavior: quantitative assessments of effectiveness. (Training Nonhuman Primates Using Positive Reinforcement Techniques)

    Contributor(s):: Schapiro, S. J., Bloomsmith, M. A., Laule, G. E.

    Many suggest that operant conditioning techniques can be applied successfully to improve the behavioral management of nonhuman primates in research settings. However, relatively little empirical data exist to support this claim. This article is a review of several studies that discussed applied...