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  1. The effects of caretaker-primate relationships on primates in the laboratory

    Contributor(s):: Waitt, C., Buchanan-Smith, H. M., Morris, K.

    As contact with caretakers is likely to make up the majority of human-primate interactions in laboratories, caretakers represent an important influence in the lives of captive primates. The aim of this study was to determine how caretaker-primate relationships affected the behaviour of primates...

  2. A case study employing operant conditioning to reduce stress of capture for red-bellied tamarins ( Saguinus labiatus )

    Contributor(s):: Owen, Y., Amory, J. R.

    Traditional techniques used to capture New World monkeys, such as net capture, can induce high levels of acute stress detrimental to welfare. Alternatively, training nonhuman animals via operant conditioning to voluntarily participate in husbandry and/or veterinary practices is accepted as a...

  3. Evaluating paint rollers as an intervention for alopecia in monkeys in the laboratory ( Macaca nemestrina )

    Contributor(s):: Runeson, E. P., Lee, G. H., Crockett, C. M., Bellanca, R. U.

    Adult female macaques (Macaca nemestrina) in the laboratory with alopecia from known or suspected overgrooming were subjects in a study evaluating effectiveness of a grooming device. The intervention evaluated was a paint roller on a metal bar hung on the cage, replaced weekly for 6 weeks. In a...

  4. Pair housing for female longtailed and rhesus macaques in the laboratory: behavior in protected contact versus full contact

    Contributor(s):: Baker, K. C., Crockett, C. M., Lee, G. H., Oettinger, B. C., Schoof, V., Thom, J. P.

    Pair housing for caged macaques in the laboratory generally allows unrestricted tactile contact but, less commonly, may involve limited contact via grooming-contact bars or perforated panels. The purpose of using this protected contact housing, which prevents entry into pair-mates' cages,...

  5. Video preference assessment and behavioral management of single-caged Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) by movie presentation

    Contributor(s):: Ogura, T., Matsuzawa, T.

    Movie presentation can act as an enrichment technique for nonhuman primates, who also show preferences for certain contents. This study investigated the video preferences and effects of movies on behavioral abnormalities in single-caged Japanese macaques. When movie rewards were provided for...

  6. Effects of single-use and group-use enrichment on stereotypy and intragroup aggressive and affiliative behaviors of a social group of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) at the Singapore Zoo

    Contributor(s):: Sha, J., Han, S., Marlena, D., Kee, J.

    Four food-based enrichment devices were used to test the effects of single-use and group-use enrichment devices on stereotypy, intragroup aggression, and affiliation in a compatible group of 5 squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus). All enrichment devices were found to reduce overall stereotypic...

  7. Efficient cooperative restraint training with rhesus macaques

    Contributor(s):: Bliss-Moreau, E., Theil, J., Moadab, G.

    It is sometimes necessary for nonhuman primates to be restrained during biomedical and psychosocial research. Such restraint is often accomplished using a "primate chair." This article details a method for training adult rhesus macaques to cooperate with a chair restraint procedure using positive...

  8. A comparison of positive reinforcement training techniques in owl and squirrel monkeys: time required to train to reliability

    Contributor(s):: Rogge, J., Sherenco, K., Malling, R., Thiele, E., Lambeth, S., Schapiro, S., Williams, L.

    Positive reinforcement training (PRT) techniques enhance the psychological well being of nonhuman primates by increasing the animal's control over his or her environment and desensitizing the animal to stressful stimuli. However, the literature on PRT in neotropical primates is limited. Here PRT...

  9. Fecal concentrations of cortisol, testosterone, and progesterone in cotton-top tamarins housed in different zoological parks: relationships among physiological data, environmental conditions, and behavioral patterns

    Contributor(s):: Fontani, S., Vaglio, S., Beghelli, V., Mattioli, M., Bacci, S., Accorsi, P. A.

    The aim of this investigation was to study the welfare of 3 captive groups of cotton-top tamarins housed in different zoological parks. Ethological observations were conducted during 1 year. In addition, fecal samples were collected and the concentrations of glucocorticoids, androgens, and...

  10. Pets and pests: vervet monkey intake at a specialist South African rehabilitation centre

    Contributor(s):: Healy, A., Nijman, V.

    Vervet monkeys ( Chlorocebus pygerythrus) encounter a plethora of anthropogenic risks as a result of their ability to exploit human-altered environments. A systematic assessment of these risks has not been carried out to date. Here, we aim to begin addressing this gap in our understanding of...

  11. A comparison of body size, coat condition and endoparasite diversity of wild Barbary macaques exposed to different levels of tourism

    Contributor(s):: Borg, C., Majolo, B., Qarro, M., Semple, S.

    Primate tourism is a rapidly growing industry with the potential to provide considerable conservation benefits. However, assessing the impact of tourists on the animals involved is vital to ensure that the conservation value of primate tourism is maximized. In this study, we compared body size,...

  12. Abnormal behaviour in captive sooty mangabeys

    Contributor(s):: Crast, J., Bloomsmith, M. A., Perlman, J. E., Meeker, T. L., Remillard, C. M.

    The influence of several factors on abnormal behaviour was investigated in 46 singly housed sooty mangabeys ( Cercocebus atys) (eight nursery-reared, 38 mother-reared), including self-injurious, self-directed, stereotypic locomotion, and faeces/urine-related behaviours (SIB, SDB, SL, FUR,...

  13. The positional quality of life and death: a theory of human-animal relations in animism

    Contributor(s):: Praet, I.

  14. Tourism and infant-directed aggression in Tibetan macaques ( Macaca thibetana) at Mt. Huangshan, China

    Contributor(s):: Self, S., Sheeran, L. K., Matheson, M. D., Li, JinHua, Pelton, O., Harding, S., Wagner, R. S.

  15. Benefits of naturalistic free-ranging primate displays and implications for increased human-primate interactions

    Contributor(s):: Sha, ChihMun, Kabilan, B., Alagappasamy, S., Guha, B.

  16. Cognitive bias in a non-human primate: husbandry procedures influence cognitive indicators of psychological well-being in captive rhesus macaques

    Contributor(s):: Bethell, E. J., Holmes, A., MacLarnon, A., Semple, S.

  17. Food distribution effects on the behaviour of captive common marmosets, Callithrix jacchus

    Contributor(s):: Bjone, S. J., Price, I. R., McGreevy, P. D.

  18. Artificial colour treatment mediates aggression among unfamiliar vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops): a model for introducing primates with colourful sexual skin

    Contributor(s):: Gerald, M. S., Weiss, A., Ayala, J. E.

  19. Animal welfare considerations in primate rehabilitation: an assessment of three vervet monkey (Chlorocebus aethiops) releases in Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa

    Contributor(s):: Guy, A. J., Stone, O. M. L., Curnoe, D.

  20. The training of cynomolgus monkeys and how the human/animal relationship improves with environmental and mental enrichment

    Contributor(s):: Heath, M.