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  1. Risk factors and remediation of self-injurious and self-abuse behavior in rhesus macaques

    Contributor(s):: Rommeck, I., Anderson, K., Heagerty, A., Cameron, A., McCowan, B.

    Considered signs of decreased welfare - abnormal behaviors such as self-injury and self-abuse among nonhuman primates housed in the laboratory - may put into question the validity and reliability of scientific research using these animals as models. Providing environmental enrichment decreases...

  2. Self-biting in caged macaques: cause, effect, and treatment

    Contributor(s):: Reinhardt, V., Rossell, M.

    Injurious self-biting is one of the most serious problems in primate colonies (Niemeyer, Gray, & Stephen, 1996). "Approximately 10% of captive, individually-housed monkeys engage in the disturbing phenomenon of self-injurious behavior (SIB). To date, no adequate explanation or effective therapy...

  3. Severe intragroup aggressions in captive common marmosets ( Callithrix jacchus )

    Contributor(s):: Filippis, B. de, Chiarotti, F., Vitale, A.

    Members of captive colonies of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus), a small New World primate, can occasionally be victims of repeated, and potentially fatal, attacks by a family-mate. This study examined the records of a colony, looking for past instances of such aggressions. The aim was to...

  4. The development of an operant conditioning training program for New World primates at the Bronx Zoo. (Training Nonhuman Primates Using Positive Reinforcement Techniques)

    Contributor(s):: Savastano, G., Hanson, A., McCann, C.

    This article described the development of an operant conditioning training programme for 17 species of New World primates at the Bronx Zoo, New York, USA. To apply less invasive techniques to husbandry protocols, the study introduced behaviours such as hand feeding, syringe feeding, targeting,...

  5. The effect of the captive environment on activity of captive cotton-top tamarins ( Saguinus oedipus )

    Contributor(s):: Burrell, A. M., Altman, J. D.

    This study examined captive cotton-top tamarin (Saguinus oedipus) behaviour across 3 different exhibits: (a) a rain forest (30.5 m in diameter), where tamarins free-ranged with other species; (b) a caged outdoor exhibit (5 m in diameter); and (c) a caged enclosure, with access indoors (6x9 m) and...

  6. The effects of caretaker-primate relationships on primates in the laboratory

    Contributor(s):: Waitt, C., Buchanan-Smith, H. M., Morris, K.

    As contact with caretakers is likely to make up the majority of human-primate interactions in laboratories, caretakers represent an important influence in the lives of captive primates. The aim of this study was to determine how caretaker-primate relationships affected the behaviour of primates...

  7. The lower row monkey cage: an overlooked variable in biomedical research

    Contributor(s):: Reinhardt, V., Reinhardt, A.

    A survey of 96 primatological articles revealed that cage location of research monkeys is rarely mentioned, although the environment of upper and lower row-housed animals markedly differs in terms of light quality, light intensity, and living dimension. Not accounting for these uncontrolled...

  8. The myth of the aggressive monkey

    Contributor(s):: Reinhardt, V.

    Captive rhesus macaques are not naturally aggressive, but poor husbandry and handling practices can trigger their aggression toward conspecifics and toward the human handler. The myth of the aggressive monkey probably is based on often not taking into account basic ethological principles when...

  9. The role of zoos in the rehabilitation of animals in the circus

    Contributor(s):: Gupta, B. K., Bipul, Chakraborty

    In 1998, the government of India enforced a ban on performance/exhibition of 5 species of nonhuman animals: (a) lions, (b) tigers, (c) leopards, (d) bears, and (e) monkeys. The Ministry of Environment and Forests gave the responsibility to the Central Zoo Authority (CZA) for rehabilitation of...

  10. Training common marmosets ( Callithrix jacchus ) to cooperate during routine laboratory procedures: ease of training and time investment. (Training Nonhuman Primates Using Positive Reinforcement Techniques)

    Contributor(s):: McKinley, J., Buchanan-Smith, H. M., Bassett, L., Morris, K.

    The first author trained 12 laboratory-housed common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) in pairs to assess the practicality of positive reinforcement training as a technique in the management of these nonhuman animals. Behaviours taught were target training to allow homecage weighing and providing...

  11. Training nonhuman primates to cooperate with scientific procedures in applied biomedical research. (Training Nonhuman Primates Using Positive Reinforcement Techniques)

    Contributor(s):: Scott, L., Pearce, P., Fairhall, S., Muggleton, N., Smith, J.

    This report provides a brief overview of aspects of training nonhuman primates who have been, and continue to be, used in this laboratory. The research context involves applied behavioral studies in which animals are trained to perform complex operant behavioral sequences, often in their homecage...

  12. Use of enclosure space by captive lion-tailed macaques ( Macaca silenus ) housed in Indian zoos

    Contributor(s):: Avanti, Mallapur, Waran, N., Anindya, Sinha

    Captive nonhuman animals use enclosure space differentially. Enclosure features strongly influence this. This study recorded both the enclosure space used by 47 captive lion-tailed macaques housed in 13 zoos across India and the behaviour of the macaques. The exhibition of abnormal behaviors,...

  13. Video preference assessment and behavioral management of single-caged Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) by movie presentation

    Contributor(s):: Ogura, T., Matsuzawa, T.

    Movie presentation can act as an enrichment technique for nonhuman primates, who also show preferences for certain contents. This study investigated the video preferences and effects of movies on behavioral abnormalities in single-caged Japanese macaques. When movie rewards were provided for...

  14. Working with rather than against macaques during blood collection. (Training Nonhuman Primates Using Positive Reinforcement Techniques)

    Contributor(s):: Reinhardt, V.

    Training macaques to cooperate during blood collection is a practicable and safe alternative to the traditional procedure implying forced restraint. It takes a cumulative total of about 1 hr to train an adult female or adult male rhesus macaque successfully to present a leg voluntarily and accept...

  15. Pets and pests: vervet monkey intake at a specialist South African rehabilitation centre

    Contributor(s):: Healy, A., Nijman, V.

    Vervet monkeys ( Chlorocebus pygerythrus) encounter a plethora of anthropogenic risks as a result of their ability to exploit human-altered environments. A systematic assessment of these risks has not been carried out to date. Here, we aim to begin addressing this gap in our understanding of...

  16. A comparison of body size, coat condition and endoparasite diversity of wild Barbary macaques exposed to different levels of tourism

    Contributor(s):: Borg, C., Majolo, B., Qarro, M., Semple, S.

    Primate tourism is a rapidly growing industry with the potential to provide considerable conservation benefits. However, assessing the impact of tourists on the animals involved is vital to ensure that the conservation value of primate tourism is maximized. In this study, we compared body size,...

  17. Abnormal behaviour in captive sooty mangabeys

    Contributor(s):: Crast, J., Bloomsmith, M. A., Perlman, J. E., Meeker, T. L., Remillard, C. M.

    The influence of several factors on abnormal behaviour was investigated in 46 singly housed sooty mangabeys ( Cercocebus atys) (eight nursery-reared, 38 mother-reared), including self-injurious, self-directed, stereotypic locomotion, and faeces/urine-related behaviours (SIB, SDB, SL, FUR,...

  18. Benefits of naturalistic free-ranging primate displays and implications for increased human-primate interactions

    Contributor(s):: Sha, ChihMun, Kabilan, B., Alagappasamy, S., Guha, B.

  19. The positional quality of life and death: a theory of human-animal relations in animism

    Contributor(s):: Praet, I.

  20. Tourism and infant-directed aggression in Tibetan macaques ( Macaca thibetana) at Mt. Huangshan, China

    Contributor(s):: Self, S., Sheeran, L. K., Matheson, M. D., Li, JinHua, Pelton, O., Harding, S., Wagner, R. S.