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  1. Naturecultures and the affective (dis)entanglements of happy meat

    Contributor(s):: Bruckner, Heide K., Colombino, Annalisa, Ermann, Ulrich

  2. Should the Endangered Status of the Giant Panda Really Be Reduced? The Case of Giant Panda Conservation in Sichuan, China

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Ben Ma, Shuo Lei, Qin Qing, Yali Wen

    The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) reduced the threat status of the giant panda from “endangered” to “vulnerable” in September 2016. In this study, we analyzed current practices for giant panda conservation at regional and local environmental...

  3. An Examination of an Iconic Trap-Neuter-Return Program: The Newburyport, Massachusetts Case Study

    | Contributor(s):: David D. Spehar, Peter J. Wolf

    Local communities in the United States are commonly responsible for selecting the most appropriate method of managing free-roaming cats. Lethal management has been widely utilized for generations, but the use of trap–neuter–return (TNR) has grown in recent decades. Despite expanded...

  4. Review of Animals and African Ethics

    | Contributor(s):: Luis Cordeiro-Rodrigues

    This article is a book review of the book Animals and African Ethics by Kai Horsthemke. I argue this is a brilliant book that gives a clear overview of how Africans see animals. However, I also contend that Horsthemke could have had a more charitable approach to African ideas and explore how an...

  5. A Cultural Conscience for Conservation

    | Contributor(s):: Caroline Good, Dawn Burnham, David W Macdonald

    On 2 July 2015, the killing of a lion nicknamed “Cecil” prompted the largest global reaction in the history of wildlife conservation. In response to this, it is propitious to consider the ways in which this moment can be developed into a financial movement to transform the...

  6. Can Citizen Science Assist in Determining Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) Presence in a Declining Population?

    | Contributor(s):: Emily Flower, Darryl Jones, Lilia Bernede

    The acceptance and application of citizen science has risen over the last 10 years, with this rise likely attributed to an increase in public awareness surrounding anthropogenic impacts affecting urban ecosystems. Citizen science projects have the potential to expand upon data collected by...

  7. Polar Similar: Intersections of Anthropology and Conservation

    | Contributor(s):: Nathan Poirier, Sarah Tomasello

    Anthropologists and conservationists have a long history of conflict, largely stemming from the creation of protected areas that are frequently placed on the land belonging to Indigenous communities for which anthropologists advocate. While this paper does not wish to diminish the values of...

  8. Detusking Fence-Breaker Elephants as an Approach in Human-Elephant Conflict Mitigation

    | Contributor(s):: Matthew Mutinda, Geoffrey Chenge, Francis Gakuya, Moses Otiende, Patrick Omondi, Samuel Kasiki, Ramon C. Soriguer, Samer Alasaad

    BackgroundHuman-elephant conflict (HEC) is a recurring problem that appears wherever the range of elephants and humans overlap. Different methods including the use of electric fences are used worldwide to mitigate this conflict. Nonetheless, elephants learn quickly that their tusks do not conduct...

  9. First reported case of fatal tuberculosis in a wild African elephant with past human-wildlife contact

    | Contributor(s):: Vincent Obanda, J. Poghon, M. Yongo, I. Mulei, M. Ngotho, K. Waititu, J. Makumi, F. Gakuya, P. Omondi, R.C. Soriguer, S. Alasaad

    Tuberculosis is emerging/re-emerging in captive elephant populations, where it causes morbidity and deaths, although no case of TB in wild African elephants has been reported. In this paper we report the first case of fatal TB in an African elephant in the wild. The infection with Mycobacterium...

  10. Hunting Bambi : evaluating the basis for selective harvesting of juveniles

    | Contributor(s):: Jos M. Milner, Christophe Bonefant, Atle Mysterud

    Human harvesting is often a major mortality factor and, hence, an important proximate factor driving the population dynamics of large mammals. Several selective harvesting regimes focus on removing animals with low reproductive value, such as “antlered” harvests in North America and...

  11. Re-Homing Exotic Species - A Pilot Program to Prevent Release of Exotic Aquatic Pet Species

    | Contributor(s):: Andrew M. Lazur, Ruth Hanessian

    An educational poster program designed to inform pet owners of the dangers of releasing exotic species and provide a re-homing mechanism was evaluated as a means to reduce unwanted environmental releases. The poster provided a URL to the program partners' Web site, which listed participating...

  12. Evaluating the Endangered Species Act: Trends in Mega-Petitions, Judicial Review, and Budget Constraints Reveal a Costly Dilemma for Species Conservation

    | Contributor(s):: Candee Wilde

    The year 2013 called for a celebration in recognition of the fortieth anniversary of the Endangered Species Act (ESA or Act). In 1973, President Nixon signed the ESA into effect, acknowledging the growing concern that natural resources in the United States were...

  13. Consider the Possum: Foes, Anti-Animals, and Colonists in Paradise

    | Contributor(s):: Nicholas Holm

  14. Responses of Birds to Humans at a Coastal Barrier Beach: Napatree Point, Rhode Island

    | Contributor(s):: Thomas W. Mayo, Peter W.C. Paton, Peter August

    Human activity is one of the most important factors affecting disturbance to birds that use coastal barrier beaches in southern New England. The barrier beach at Napatree Point, RI, provides important breeding habitat for several bird species, key stopover habitat for thousands of migrating...

  15. The Endangered Species Act: Should it Affect Indian Hunting and Fishing Rights?

    | Contributor(s):: R.l. Stoney Burk

    Problems with the regulation of wildlife, as in other areas of public land management, have often been ignored until they became a crisis. Only in the past two decades has there been any significant attempt on the federal level to protect and manage wildlife. One of the most significant and,...

  16. Endangered Species Conservation: What Should We Expect of Federal Agencies?

    | Contributor(s):: Robert L. Fischman

    Twenty years after the landmark 1973 endangered species legislation, the public still does not have a clear sense of what it can expect from federal agencies. To be sure, certain duties are clearly prescribed. The citizen suitprovision of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) has helped...

  17. Stay the Hand: New Directions for the Endangered Species Act

    | Contributor(s):: Thomas France, Jack Tuholske

    The 1973 passage of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) stands as a landmark event in the evolution of wildlife law in the United States. While earlier statutes such as the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act required the...

  18. Recovery, Conservation, and Survival under the Endangered Species Act: Recovering Species, Conserving Resources, and Saving the Law

    | Contributor(s):: Jason M. Patlis

    Protecting and recovering endangered and threatened species is bad business. It is a short-term, high-risk, and high-cost proposition-not exactly a formula for success. It is also an unpopular business. Resource users cringe at the prospect of the burdensome regulations and...

  19. Straying Wild Horses and the Range Landowner: The Search for Peaceful Coexistence

    | Contributor(s):: Alfred W. Buckley, William W. Buckley

    In 1971 Congress passed Public Law 92-195, the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and -Burros Act,' to preserve a vanishing symbol of American pioneer heritage.' Before this statute was enacted, wild horses and burros were in danger of extinction. Today the success of the Act has...

  20. The Endangered Species Act: A New Avenue for Climate Change Litigation

    | Contributor(s):: Sarah Jane Morath

    Polar bears grace the cover of numerous wildlife calendars and magazines; they generate crowds at zoos and aquariums; they are popular stuffed animals; they even appear in soft drink commercials. Despite their fame, a time could come when polar bears no longer roam the Arctic. The...