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  1. Landuse practices interface:Human-Wildlife conflict in Lupande game management area

    Contributor(s):: Peter Ngoma

    Human-Wildlife Conflict (HWC) has become a serious threat to the survival of many endangered species in the world. The sighted examples from different countries such as Kenya, Zimbabwe, Zanzibar, Namibia, China and Peru demonstrate the severity of the conflict and suggest that greater in depth...

  2. Role of environmental education in addressing Human-Animal conflict in Zambia's game management area

    Contributor(s):: Chimbwe Nyambe

    Human-animal conflict, particularly human-carnivore conflict, is a growing problem in today’s crowded world, and can have significant impacts on both human and wildlife populations. Despite the application of different management practices, both locally and globally, the problem still...

  3. Representations of polar bears in tourism: Exploring power relations through discourse analysis

    Historical and contemporary relationships between human beings and polar bears are dynamic and complex, and the lives of these two animal species continue to be intimately intertwined in the tourism context. The polar bear viewing industry increasingly relies on the (re)creation, dissemination,...

  4. The Healing Properties of Nature and Animals

    Contributor(s):: Ravmeet Ruby Bains

    The following piece is intended to enlighten readers on alternative healing modalities as a substitute for traditional therapeutic interventions. The study reviews wide-ranging literature on ecotherapy and animal-assisted therapy. The objective is not to compare well-known therapies, such as...

  5. Modeling perceived risk from coyotes among Chicago residents

    Contributor(s):: Molly Spacapan

    Coyote management in urban areas has become a concern for wildlife professionals. In the Greater Chicago Metropolitan Region (GCMR) wildlife professionals have received an increased number of complaints from residents. Based on cultural theory and cognitive hierarchy theory, we hypothesized that...

  6. The role of the domestic cat in relation to game birds in the Willamette Valley, Oregon

    Contributor(s):: Nils Norman Nilsson

    The main purpose of this study was to ascertain the importance of the domestic cat in the Willamette Valley as a game bird predator; additional reasons were to learn more of its life history and food habits, and to analyze the popular belief that the cat, feral or non-feral, is the greatest...

  7. Unifying ecological and social sciences into a management framework for wildlife-based tourism: a case study of feeding stingrays as a marine tourism attraction in the Cayman Islands

    Contributor(s):: Christina A.D. Semeniuk

    As marine wildlife tourism attractions increase in popularity, the integration of natural and social sciences is required to ascertain and then assimilate strategies to effectively address the undesirable ecological and social conditions of the wildlife tourism setting. The overarching objective...

  8. Public Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior towards Sharks and Shark Conservation

    Contributor(s):: Jason O'Bryhim

    Many species of shark are in danger of overexploitation and could possibly be facing  extinction. Sharks have been around for over 400 million years but recent declines that  threaten their existence can be traced back to the current consumptive uses brought on by  humans. If...

  9. Survey of Attitudes Toward, Conflicts With and Management Of Wolves and Bears in Rural Villages in Armenia

    Contributor(s):: Serda Ozbenian

    Many studies aimed at assessing human attitudes towards and negative interactions  (conflicts) with carnivores, such as wolves (Canis lupus) and bears (Ursus arctos), have  been conducted throughout the world. Although villagers in Armenia have reported  conflicts with these...

  10. Who's Afraid of the Big, Bad Coyote? A Survey of Messaging and Existing Attitudes in the National Capital Region

    Contributor(s):: Megan Draheim

    Coyotes are relatively recent arrivals to the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. In an  effort to understand and obtain baseline data about existing attitudes, a survey was  conducted in 2006. Most respondents had neutral attitudes towards coyotes, which might  be in part due to...

  11. Volunteer tourism : saving the African penguin one volunteer at a time. The case of a seabird rehabilitation centre in the Western Cape, South Africa

    Contributor(s):: Carole Olivier

    Volunteer tourism, as a form of leisure and/or recreation, is one of the fastest growing forms of tourism globally. It has also become a critical human resource for many organisations in the Western Cape, South Africa who rely on the support of volunteer tourists. A review of the current...

  12. Save the Sharks? How Negative Perceptions of Sharks Hinders Conservation

    Contributor(s):: Stephanie Reifenberg

    Sharks constitute the largest predatory fish in the ocean, with no natural marine predators of their own. Yet one visitor species to the ocean realm does significantly predate on sharks: humans. While the overexploitation of oceanic fish and marine mammals is widely recognized, the drastic...

  13. Human and Black Bear Interactions in Buncombe County, North Carolina, from 1993–2013

    Contributor(s):: Adam Guy Alsamadisi

    Over the past 20 years the frequency of interactions between humans and black bears in Buncombe County, North Carolina has been increasing, posing threats to human safety, black bear populations, ecological stability, and conservation support. During this time, both the human population and the...

  14. Human exploitation may not be the cause for the declining size of Patella vulgata (Common limpet): A comparison between the Late Norse and the modern populations of Patella vulgata at Sandwick Bay, Unst, Shetland Islands, UK

    Contributor(s):: Sarah Mae Brennan Silverberg

    Zooarchaeological artefacts like shells are a source of information on the exploitation of prehisotric the rocky intertidal zone. In this study the size and density of Patella vulgata was used to investigate the exploitation of rocky intertidal resources during the Late Norse occupation...

  15. Behaviour of brown bears (Ursus arctos) when repeatedly approached by humans on foot

    Contributor(s):: Nina Emilie Stenset

    Knowledge about encounters between humans and wildlife is important for conservation, management and policymaking, as well as for reducing conflict and negative interactions. There is general concern that an increased number of encounters might reduce wildlife flight responses. I investigated the...

  16. The Effect of Human Activity on the Welfare of the African Elephant (Loxodonta africana) in Namibia

    Contributor(s):: Iris Hagvag Ringstad

    The African elephant (Loxodonta africana) is vital in several African ecosystems, accentuating the importance of conserving them. However, conservation efforts are constantly complicated due to human population growth. Anthropogenic disturbances has been linked with elevated stress levels in...

  17. Effect of mountain biking on red deer (Cervus elaphus) in Kaupanger, Norway

    Contributor(s):: Janneke Scholten

    Human outdoor activities, like mountain biking, often affect animal behaviour. Ungulates might avoid roads and trails, and increase their avoidance with increasing human activity. Recently, biking on forest trails has increased considerably in Norway, but we still have limited knowledge about how...

  18. Human- Wildlife Conflict - The case of elephant at Mole National Park

    Contributor(s):: Zodiac Akenten

    Conflicts between wildlife and humans, particularly people who share immediate boundaries with protected areas, are common phenomenon. Declining wildlife resources has been linked to human actions through overexploitation, habitat destruction, and habitat fragmentation among others. Local people...

  19. Distribution Patterns of Human Elephant Conflict in Areas Adjacent to Rungwa Game Reserve, Tanzania

    Contributor(s):: Wilbright Munuo

    Human pressure on terrestrial ecosystems has caused loss and fragmentation of habitats for wildlife species. That has brought humans and wildlife in close proximity intensifying human wildlife conflicts, especially when wild animals with wide home ranges, such as African and Asian elephants, are...

  20. Endangered animals in wildlife tourism : A study of young female traveller attitudes

    Contributor(s):: Jenna Jussila

    This thesis is built around the discussion of wildlife welfare and animal ethics in a tourism setting. Although not being properly explored by academics, the topic of ethical wildlife use in tourism has been increasingly raised in social media. Websites such as www.tourismconcern.org.uk and...