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  1. Olfactory-based interspecific recognition of human emotions: Horses (Equus ferus caballus) can recognize fear and happiness body odour from humans (Homo sapiens)

    Contributor(s):: Sabiniewicz, Agnieszka, Tarnowska, Karolina, Świątek, Robert, Sorokowski, Piotr, Laska, Matthias

    Emotional recognition has been demonstrated to occur between members of different species. However, the majority of studies on interspecific communication of emotions so far focused on the senses of vision and hearing while the contribution of the sense of smell has rarely been studied in this...

  2. Significant Neuroanatomical Variation Among Domestic Dog Breeds

    Contributor(s):: Hecht, E. E., Smaers, J. B., Dunn, W. D., Kent, M., Preuss, T. M., Gutman, D. A.

  3. Using dogs to detect hidden corrosion

    Contributor(s):: Schoon, Adee, Fjellanger, Rune, Kjeldsen, Morten, Goss, Kai-Uwe

    Dogs used as detectors in remote scent tracing (RST) technology usually detect the presence of explosives or contraband in scent samples collected by sucking air from containers or air freight. In this study, five dogs were trained to detect corrosion under the insulation (CUI) of pipes in scent...

  4. Explosives detection by military working dogs: Olfactory generalization from components to mixtures

    Contributor(s):: Lazarowski, Lucia, Dorman, David C.

    The training of scent detection dogs using samples of explosives or their chemical precursors is a well-established and documented practice. However an area of canine odor detection that remains under-studied regards a trained dog's perception of an explosive odor when more than one odorant is...

  5. Differential responses of captive southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons) to the presence of faeces from different species and male and female conspecifics

    Contributor(s):: Descovich, Kristin A., Lisle, Allan T., Johnston, Stephen, Nicolson, Vere, Phillips, Clive J. C.

    The southern hairy-nosed wombat (Lasiorhinus latifrons) appears to use scent marking, including defaecation, for social communication in the wild. This premise assumes that the receiver wombat is able to distinguish between faeces from different sources. To examine this theory, four types of...

  6. Perception and emotions: On the relationships between stress and olfaction

    Contributor(s):: Bombail, Vincent

    Adaptations to the ever changing social and physical environment are necessary, sometimes involving the stress response. Olfaction is a chemical sense allowing the detection of molecules in the air, and many species rely on it for social recognition and fundamental functions such as feeding or...

  7. Development of test for determining olfactory investigation of complex odours in cattle

    Contributor(s):: Rørvang, Maria Vilain, Jensen, Margit Bak, Nielsen, Birte Lindstrøm

    The sense of smell is likely to influence the behaviour of domestic and captive animals in a wide range of management and housing situations. In domestic cattle, there may be unexploited potential for using odours and olfaction in the management; however, published studies on bovine olfactory...

  8. The influence of odour, taste and nutrients on feeding behaviour and food preferences in horses

    Contributor(s):: van den Berg, M., Giagos, V., Lee, C., Brown, W. Y., Cawdell-Smith, A. J., Hinch, G. N.

    While it has been established that nutrients and flavours (odour, taste) play an important role in diet selection by horses, previous studies have not always clarified what type of flavouring (e.g. non-nutritive or nutritive) was used. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the...

  9. Acceptance of novel food by horses: The influence of food cues and nutrient composition

    Contributor(s):: van den Berg, M., Giagos, V., Lee, C., Brown, W. Y., Hinch, G. N.

    Compared to ruminants little is known about how horses modulate food intake and learn about flavour-to-post-ingestive consequences. While it has been suggested that due to hindgut fermentation horse⿿s foraging preferences may be largely influenced by sensory input (e.g. volatiles), it has been...

  10. Performance of domestic dogs on an olfactory discrimination of a homologous series of alcohols

    Contributor(s):: Hall, Nathaniel J., Collada, Adriana, Smith, David W., Wynne, Clive D. L.

    Dogs are deployed for the detection of a wide variety of chemical stimuli. Despite their wide use, little basic research has explored canine olfactory generalization and discrimination. In the present study, we assessed canine odor discrimination amongst a series of chemically-related aliphatic...

  11. African elephants (Loxodonta africana) display remarkable olfactory acuity in human scent matching to sample performance

    Contributor(s):: von Dürckheim, Katharina E. M., Hoffman, Louwrens C., Leslie, Alison, Hensman, Michael C., Hensman, Sean, Schultz, Kip, Lee, Stephen

    This paper presents data on the success rate of African elephants in human scent matching to sample performance. Working with equipment and protocols similar to those used in the training of forensic canine units in Europe, scent samples were collected on cotton squares from twenty-six humans of...

  12. The effects of green odour on domestic dogs: A pilot study

    Contributor(s):: Carlone, Beatrice, Gazzano, Angelo, Gutiérrez, Jara, Sighieri, Claudio, Mariti, Chiara

    Green odour (a mixture of cis-3-hexenol and trans-2-hexenal), similar to cut grass, has been demonstrated to appease subjects of various species (rats, cattle, humans etc.) subjected to different stressful stimuli. The aim of this study was to investigate whether green odour has a calming effect...

  13. Birds and Dogs: Toward a Comparative Perspective on Odor Use and Detection

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Paola A. Prada, Kenneth G. Furton

    While canines are generally considered the gold standard for olfactory detection in many situations other animals provide alternatives and offer a unique opportunity to compare biological detection capabilities. Critical components in successfully studying biological detectors is not only...

  14. Real-Time Detection of a Virus Using Detection Dogs

    | Contributor(s):: T. Craig Angle, Thomas Passler, Paul L. Waggoner, Terrence D. Fischer, Bart Rogers, Patricia K. Galik, Herris S. Maxwell

    Viral infections are ubiquitous in humans, animals, and plants. Real-time methods to identify viral infections are limited and do not exist for use in harsh or resource-constrained environments. Previous research identified that tissues produce unique volatile organic compounds (VOC) and...

  15. Using Scent Detection Dogs in Conservation Settings: A Review of Scientific Literature Regarding Their Selection

    | Contributor(s):: Sarah C. Beebe, Tiffani J. Howell, Pauleen C. Bennett

    Dogs are widely used for scent detection work, assisting in searches for, among other things, missing persons, explosives, and even cancers. They are also increasingly used in conservation settings, being deployed for a range of diverse purposes. Although scent detecting dogs have been used in...

  16. Laterality in dogs in response to odour of human stress

    | Contributor(s):: Maren Helene Burdahl Teien

    Can dogs smell that humans are stressed? Lateralization of behaviour and neural functions is found among humans and non-human animals like mammals, amphibians, birds, fishes and reptiles. The structures in the right hemisphere tend to be more active in response to to novel stimuli, and intense...

  17. Maintenance energy requirements of odor detection, explosive detection and human detection working dogs

    | Contributor(s):: Mullis, R. A., Witzel, A. L., Price, J.

    Despite their important role in security, little is known about the energy requirements of working dogs such as odor, explosive and human detection dogs. Previous researchers have evaluated the energy requirements of individual canine breeds as well as dogs in exercise roles such as sprint...

  18. Olfactory discrimination and generalization of ammonium nitrate and structurally related odorants in Labrador retrievers

    | Contributor(s):: Lazarowski, L., Foster, M. L., Gruen, M. E., Sherman, B. L., Fish, R. E., Milgram, N. W., Dorman, D. C.

    A critical aspect of canine explosive detection involves the animal's ability respond to novel, untrained odors based on prior experience with training odors. In the current study, adult Labrador retrievers ( N=15) were initially trained to discriminate between a rewarded odor (vanillin) and an...

  19. Traits of drug and explosives detection in dogs of two breeds as evaluated by their handlers and trainers

    | Contributor(s):: Adamkiewicz, E., Jezierski, T., Walczak, M., Gorecka-Bruzda, A., Sobczynska, M., Prokopczyk, M., Ensminger, J.

    Police dogs handlers' and trainers' opinions on Labrador retrievers (n=87) and German shepherds (n=96) trained for drugs vs. explosives detection have been compared. As most important traits in both specialties the responders indicated: (1) willingness to sniff objects, (2) concentration...

  20. Individual differences in visual and olfactory cue preference and use by cats ( Felis catus)

    | Contributor(s):: Mayes, E. R. E., Wilkinson, A., Pike, T. W., Mills, D. S.

    Animals are constantly presented with stimuli through different sensory challenges, which may sometimes contain contradictory information and so they must decide which is more salient in a given situation. Both vision and olfaction are extensively utilised by the domestic cat ( Felis catus) in a...