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  1. The semiotic canine: scent processing dogs as research assistants in biomedical and environmental research

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Gadbois, S., Reeve, C.

    The use of dogs in biomedical diagnosis, detection and alert as well as for the search and monitoring of species-at-risk is an emerging field of research. Standard practices are converging towards models that are not necessarily consistent with the well established field of (animal)...

  2. Pheromonal enrichment in the zoo: An empirical approach with Asian elephants (Elephas maximus)

    | Contributor(s):: LaDue, Chase A., Schulte, Bruce A.

    2021Applied Animal Behaviour Science2351052280168-159110.1016/j.applanim.2021.105228text

  3. Dogs can detect the individual odors in a mixture of explosives

    | Contributor(s):: Gazit, Irit, Goldblatt, Allen, Grinstein, Dan, Terkel, Joseph

    2021Applied Animal Behaviour Science2351052120168-159110.1016/j.applanim.2020.105212text

  4. Use of a habituation-dishabituation paradigm to assess gilt olfaction and sensitivity to the boar pheromone

    | Contributor(s):: Aviles-Rosa, Edgar O., McGlone, John J., Hall, Nathaniel J.

    Olfactory stimuli have been used to reduce stress in weaning pigs and induce sexual behavior in sows. Despite the importance of olfaction in pig production and behavior, there is no simple method to assess pig olfaction. Thus, the objectives of this study were: (1) to evaluate the use of an...

  5. Olfactory-based interspecific recognition of human emotions: Horses (Equus ferus caballus) can recognize fear and happiness body odour from humans (Homo sapiens)

    | Contributor(s):: Sabiniewicz, Agnieszka, Tarnowska, Karolina, Świątek, Robert, Sorokowski, Piotr, Laska, Matthias

    Emotional recognition has been demonstrated to occur between members of different species. However, the majority of studies on interspecific communication of emotions so far focused on the senses of vision and hearing while the contribution of the sense of smell has rarely been studied in this...

  6. Behavioral and Perceptual Differences between Sexes in Dogs: An Overview

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Anna Scandurra, Alessandra Alterisio, Anna Di Cosmo, Biagio D’Aniello

    In this paper, we review the scientific reports of sex-related differences in dogs as compared to the outcomes described for wild animals. Our aim was to explore whether the differences in male and female dogs were affected by the domestication process, in which artificial selection is the main...

  7. Olfactory Enrichment in California Sea Lions (Zalophus californianus): An Effective Tool for Captive Welfare?

    | Contributor(s):: Samuelson, Mystera M., Lauderdale, Lisa K., Pulis, Kelly, Solangi, Moby, Hoffland, Tim, Lyn, Heidi

    In the wild, California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) are exposed to a wide variety of sensory information, which cannot be replicated in captive environments. Therefore, unique procedures are necessary for maintaining physiological and psychological health in nonhuman animals in captivity....

  8. Explosives detection by military working dogs: Olfactory generalization from components to mixtures

    | Contributor(s):: Lazarowski, Lucia, Dorman, David C.

    The training of scent detection dogs using samples of explosives or their chemical precursors is a well-established and documented practice. However an area of canine odor detection that remains under-studied regards a trained dog's perception of an explosive odor when more than one odorant is...

  9. The effects of three types of environmental enrichment on the behaviour of captive Javan gibbons (Hylobates moloch)

    | Contributor(s):: Gronqvist, Gabriella, Kingston-Jones, Mark, May, Adam, Lehmann, Julia

    Studies on a large variety of species have shown that enrichment can be successfully used to encourage natural behaviours, to decrease rates of abnormal behaviour and to improve welfare in captive animals. However, whether or not a specific enrichment device is enriching depends on the species...

  10. Enrichment for captive tigers (Panthera tigris): Current knowledge and future directions

    | Contributor(s):: Szokalski, Monika S., Litchfield, Carla A., Foster, Wendy K.

    Environmental enrichment is a common approach for addressing stereotypic behaviour in captive animals. Like many big cats, tigers (Panthera tigris) are renowned for their stereotypic pacing, yet relatively little is known about optimal enrichment for this species. Given the large proportion of...

  11. Differential responses of captive southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons) to the presence of faeces from different species and male and female conspecifics

    | Contributor(s):: Descovich, Kristin A., Lisle, Allan T., Johnston, Stephen, Nicolson, Vere, Phillips, Clive J. C.

    The southern hairy-nosed wombat (Lasiorhinus latifrons) appears to use scent marking, including defaecation, for social communication in the wild. This premise assumes that the receiver wombat is able to distinguish between faeces from different sources. To examine this theory, four types of...

  12. Behavioural analysis of solitary versus socially housed snow leopards (Panthera uncia), with the provision of simulated social contact

    | Contributor(s):: Macri, Alaina M., Patterson-Kane, Emily

    Activity budgets of 18 captive snow leopards were analyzed in order to assess the behaviour of cats housed singly versus those housed socially. Six solitary snow leopards and 12 socially housed snow leopards were compared. Pacing and activity level were used as indicators of the potential welfare...

  13. Canine Olfactory Thresholds to Amyl Acetate in a Biomedical Detection Scenario

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Astrid R. Concha, Claire M. Guest, Rob Harris, Thomas W. Pike, Alexandre Feugier, Helen Zulch, Daniel S. Mills

    Dogs’ abilities to respond to concentrations of odorant molecules are generally deemed superior to electronic sensors. This sensitivity has been used traditionally in many areas; but is a more recent innovation within the medical field. As a bio-detection sensor for human diseases such as...

  14. Ethanol and a chemical from fox faeces modulate exploratory behaviour in laboratory mice

    | Contributor(s):: Grau, Carlos, Leclercq, Julien, Descout, Estelle, Teruel, Eva, Bienboire-Frosini, Cécile, Pageat, Patrick

    Mice are macrosmatic animals that use olfaction as their main source of information to increase fitness; they process predator cues to assess risk, and plants and fruit cues to find nutritional resources and assess their quality or toxicity. In this study, we examined the effects of ethanol as an...

  15. Perception and emotions: On the relationships between stress and olfaction

    | Contributor(s):: Bombail, Vincent

    Adaptations to the ever changing social and physical environment are necessary, sometimes involving the stress response. Olfaction is a chemical sense allowing the detection of molecules in the air, and many species rely on it for social recognition and fundamental functions such as feeding or...

  16. Let me sniff! Nosework induces positive judgment bias in pet dogs

    | Contributor(s):: Duranton, C., Horowitz, A.

    When confronted with an ambiguous stimulus, an individual’s perception of and behaviour towards the situation are affected by emotional states. In a new situation, positive emotional states lead to optimistic reactions; negative emotional states, to pessimistic reactions. This phenomenon is...

  17. The nose may not know: Dogs’ reactions to rattlesnake odours

    | Contributor(s):: Mulholland, Michele M., Olivas, Victoria, Caine, Nancy G.

    According to anecdotal reports from dog (Canis lupus familiaris) owners and data from veterinary studies, domestic dogs often fail to avoid, and indeed will approach, venomous snakes. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that odours associated with rattlesnakes will elicit investigation, but not...

  18. Development of test for determining olfactory investigation of complex odours in cattle

    | Contributor(s):: Rørvang, Maria Vilain, Jensen, Margit Bak, Nielsen, Birte Lindstrøm

    The sense of smell is likely to influence the behaviour of domestic and captive animals in a wide range of management and housing situations. In domestic cattle, there may be unexploited potential for using odours and olfaction in the management; however, published studies on bovine olfactory...

  19. Stress, security, and scent: The influence of chemical signals on the social lives of domestic cats and implications for applied settings

    | Contributor(s):: Vitale Shreve, Kristyn R., Udell, Monique A. R.

    Although millions of cats live among humans worldwide the scientific community knows relatively little about cat behavior and cognition. Olfaction is an important perceptual sense for many members of Carnivora, however the role of chemical signals in cat social relationships is not fully...

  20. A synthetic olfactory agonist reduces aggression when sows are mixed into small groups

    | Contributor(s):: Plush, Kate, Hughes, Paul, Herde, Paul, van Wettere, William

    Synthetic olfactory agonists mimic odours secreted by mammary glands in several mammal species and their application can reduce anxiety levels in both juvenile and adult animals. This investigation determined the effect of a commercially available synthetic olfactory agonist administration on...