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  1. Therapy Dog Ownership as Serious Leisure for Members of a Therapy Dog Volunteer Group

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jonathan R. Hicks, Mary Kramer

    Therapy dogs are used in a variety of settings, including prisons, hospitals, and schools, for the purposes of providing emotional and psychological support to humans. They are trained to be well behaved and to be perceived as supportive of humans. This study sought to explore the benefits to...

  2. Animal-Assisted Interventions: Relationship Between Standards and Qualifications

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Greta Kerulo, Niko Kargas, Daniel S. Mills, Graham Law, Rise VanFleet, Tracie Faa-Thompson, Melissa Y. Winkle

    Ethical practice of animal- assisted interventions (AAI) requires appropriate qualifications and experience for all parties involved. Recently introduced and updated Standards of Practice emphasize the importance of AAI- specific training and qualification for different types of AAI, which...

  3. Are Nurses Joining the Ride? Equine-Assisted Activities and Therapies Review

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Khalid Bandar Almasloukh, Pamela Stewart Fahs

    Background: Equine-assisted activities and therapies (EAAT) is a rapidly growing practice that is described as therapeutic and entertaining. Complementary therapies such as EAAT are gaining acceptance as the health care needs of the population are changing. Method: This systematic review draws...

  4. A Transdisciplinary Perspective on Dog-Handler-Client Interactions in Animal Assisted Activities for Children, Youth and Young Adults

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Renata P. S. Roma, Christine Yvette Tardif-Williams, Shannon A. Moore, Sandra L. Bosacki

    A growing body of research has linked the inclusion of dogs in Animal-Assisted Activities (AAA) for children and young adults to a diverse range of positive social emotional and cognitive outcomes. However, many studies have focused exclusively on aspects directly related to dog-client...

  5. Human-Animal Co-sleeping Practices among Australian Dog Owners

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Christy L. Hoffman, Peta C. Hazelton, Bradley P. Smith

    Human-animal co-sleeping is relatively common among dog owners; however, the nature of this practice is not well understood. Recent investigations have focused on the impact of human-dog co-sleeping on human sleep but have largely ignored the contextual nature of the practice, including with...

  6. Working Out with F.I.D.O. (Frequency, Intensity, Duration, & Outcomes): A Feasibility Randomized Controlled Trial

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Clarise Lim, Joan Wharf Higgins, Ryan E. Rhodes

    Objective: Dog owners walk more per week compared to non-dog owners; however, 60% of dog owners are still not walking their dogs at intensities sufficient to reap optimal health benefits. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of a 9-week randomized...

  7. The Anodyne-Agent Model: A Framework for Conceptualizing the Animal's Role in Animal-Assisted Intervention

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Angela K. Fournier, Elizabeth A. Letson, Thomas D. Berry, Jennifer Laitala, Lauren Proels, Kelli Kavanaugh

    This research introduces the anodyne-agent model as a framework for conceptualizing the animalís role in animal-assisted interventions. The model suggests animals assist interventions aimed at human health and well-being by (a) enhancing positive emotion and decreasing negative emotion,...

  8. Measuring the Social, Behavioral, and Academic Effects of Classroom Pets on Third and Fourth-Grade Students

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Amy McCullough, Ashleigh Ruehrdanz, Rachel Garthe, Cynthia Hellman, Marguerite O'Haire

    Limited research has documented the benefits of animals for children's learning and development, with a growing number of elementary school teachers incorporating pets into their classrooms. This study assessed the social, behavioral, and academic effects of the presence of small, resident...

  9. Bridging the Gap between Personality-Social Psychology and Human-Animal Interaction Research

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Anthony E. Coy, Christopher J. Holden

    Personality and social psychology are two of the broadest subfields within psychology. Social psychology extends into areas such as perception and cognition while providing more unique contributions in specific domains such as close relationships and aggression. Personality cuts across all areas...

  10. "Thriving Through Relationships" as a useful adjunct to existing theoretical frameworks used in human-companion dog interaction literature

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jennifer Gravrok, Dan Bendrups, Tiffani Howell, Pauleen C. Bennett

    The relationship formed between a human and a dog can be transformative. Human-Animal Interaction (HAI) research aims to understand why these relationships are so important. Within this field, human-dog relationships have been explained through various theoretical constructs, of which the...

  11. Do Domestic Cats (Felis silvestris catus) infer Reputation in Humans after Direct and Indirect Experience?

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jessica Leete, Jennifer Vonk, Silvia Oriani, Taryn Eaton, Jennifer Lieb

    Although felids in general tend to be relatively asocial, domestic cats live closely with humans and other domestic species and thus, might be expected to respond to cues indicating, for example, the reputation of others. Furthermore, recent research with other less social species suggests that...

  12. Personality Traits and Owner-Dog Attachment in a Canadian Sample

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Morag G. Ryan, Anne E. Storey, Rita E. Anderson, Carolyn J. Walsh

    Much of the literature on owner-dog attachment and the influence of personality on the owner-dog relationship has originated in Europe, with few studies in North America. To address this imbalance, 29 owner-dog dyads from a Canadian population were tested in the Strange Situation Test (SST) and...

  13. Perceptions of Animal Assisted Reading and its Results Reported by Involved Children, Parents and Teachers of a Portuguese Elementary School

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Elsa Canelo

    This article presents preliminary results of a longitudinal qualitative study of a small-sample trial of Animal Assisted Reading (AAR), designed to overcome reading difficulties of second grade children in an elementary school in Lisbon's outskirts, through reading sessions to a...

  14. "We Lost a Member of the Family": Predictors of the Grief Experience Surrounding the Loss of a Pet

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Anna Maria C. Behler, Jeffrey D. Green, Jennifer Joy-Gaba

    Pets play an important role in their owners' lives and are often viewed as family members. However, research on human-animal relationships suggests that pet owners often receive relatively less emotional support when experiencing grief after the death of a beloved pet, a phenomenon known as...

  15. A Logic Model of a Dementia-specific Program of Equine-assisted Activities

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Rebecca Lassell, Beth Fields, Sarah Busselman, Tauren Hempel, Wendy Wood

    Insufficient descriptions of what comprises animal-assisted interventions and why and how they are presumed to work pose significant challenges to their replication and further scientific development. The purpose of this study was to construct a comprehensive research-based logic model describing...

  16. Psychophysiological effects of human-dog interaction in university students exposed to a stress-induced situation using the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST).

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Rafael Martos-Montes, David OrdÛÒez-PÈrez, Jes˙s Ruiz-Maatallah, Miriam MartÌnez-Cobos

    Enjoying the company of a good-natured dog can lend support to a person in a stressful situation. This presence brings benefits across different areas of human well-being and leads to a decrease in levels of sympathetic activation and subjective distress which are triggered in social anxiety...

  17. Human-Animal-Environment Interactions and Self-Regulation in Youth with Psychosocial Challenges: Initial Assessment of the Green Chimneys Model

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Erin Flynn, Megan K. Mueller, Denise Luft, G. John Geldhof, Steve Klee, Philip Tedeschi, Kevin N. Morris

    As animal-assisted interventions (AAIs) become increasingly popular in youth-based settings, there is a significant need for robust, theoretically-predicated programs and assessment frameworks. Ample evidence suggests that AAIs and nature-based interventions have broad emotional, cognitive, and...

  18. Stress Reduction in Law Enforcement Officers and Staff through a Canine-Assisted Intervention

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: John-Tyler Binfet, Zakary A. Draper, Freya L. L. Green

    Law enforcement officers and staff are known to experience elevated workplace stress, largely due to their increased exposure to traumatic incidents. This results in individuals experiencing trauma themselves and resultant compromised physical and mental health. Law enforcement officers are also...

  19. Rationalizing the Many Uses of Animals: Application of the 4N Justifications Beyond Meat

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jared Piazza, Lucy Cooper, Shannon Slater-Johnson

    Past research has uncovered four common justifications for using animals as food -- the 4Ns -- that eating meat is Natural, Normal, Necessary, and Nice. The current research investigated the extent to which the 4Ns might apply more generally to other animal uses. Two studies examined the moral...

  20. Examining the Effect of an Animal-Assisted Intervention on Patient Distress in Outpatient Cystoscopy

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sandra Barker, Sarah Krzastek, Rebecca Vokes, Christine Schubert, Lauren Folgosa Cooley, Lance J. Hampton

    Animal assisted interventions (AAI) have ben shown to improve patient outcomes in some healthcare settings. Flexible cystoscopy, while minimally invasive, is associated with patient-reported pain, fear, and anxiety. Few techniques have been found to improve these adverse effects associated with...