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Resources (1-20 of 608)

  1. So You Have A Dog?

    Contributor(s):: Donald Irwin Craig

      So You Have a Dog? © Donald I. Craig, Jr., 2014 “We have had civilizations without horses and even civilizations without the wheel, but never civilizations without dogs.  No dogs, no humanity.” – Piero Scanziani, Italian...

  2. So You Have A Dog?

    Contributor(s):: Donald Irwin Craig, Donald I. Craig

    Responsibilities of dog ownership and benefits of a family dog.

  3. Childhood animal abuse and violent criminal behavior: a brief review of the literature

    Contributor(s):: Susan M. McDonald

    The connection between cruelty to animals in childhood/early adolescence and adult violent criminal behavior has been a topic of interest for decades. Formal research on this matter began as early as the 1960s with Mead’s 1964 bulletin article including her theory “that childhood...

  4. The Connection between Animal Abuse and Family Violence: A Selected Annotated Bibliography

    Contributor(s):: Sharon L. Nelson

    This selected annotated bibliography assembles legal and social literature that examines the link between domestic violence and animal abuse. Drawing from an ever-growing body of written works dedicated to the issue, the bibliography presents the works that are most informative and useful to the...

  5. Domestic Dogs in Communal Lands: Implications for CAMPFIRE Schemes

    Contributor(s):: J.R.A. Butler

  6. Dogs and cats need responsible owners

    Contributor(s):: Jack L. Tuttle

    Pet overpopulation has become a nationwide problem. The estimated 80 million dogs and cats in this country are about 20 percent more dogs and cats than can possibly be kept as pets. Putting unwanted animals to sleep cost $125 million in 1975. As a result, there have been increased efforts to have...

  7. A Report on Animal Overpopulation: Breeding Surplus Dogs and Cats Causes Suffering

    Contributor(s):: The Humane Society Of The United States

    Overbreeding has created a surplus of nearly 50 million dogs and cats. These animals are unwanted and homeless. Some of them--the lucky ones--will get a quick, merciful death at humane society shelters. Most, however, haven't even the hope of being reached and protected from suffering in the...

  8. HSUS Uncovers Cruel Puppy Mills

    Contributor(s):: The Humane Society Of The United States

    It is estimated that puppy mills grind out more than half a million puppies every year to be sold almost exclusively in pet stores. But it is not only puppies--who, after all, escape the squalor and crowding after six or seven weeks that suffer. Of equal concern is the fate of the puppy mill...

  9. Special Report on Controlling America's Pet Population

    Contributor(s):: The Humane Society Of The United States

    HSUS estimates that public and private animal control programs cost the nation as much as $500 million a year. Much of this expense is required for the feeding and care of unwanted animals during the 5 to 10 days they are held for adoption, killing the 80% that are not adopted or redeemed, and...

  10. Household demand for pet food and the ownership of cats and dogs: An analysis of a neglected component of U.S. food use

    Contributor(s):: Malcolm J. Purvis, Daniel M. Otto

    Since 1972/3 there has been a growing realization that U.S. food production is not unlimited and that man and animals are competing for a scarce resource at the “global dining table”. Much has been made of the inefficient conversion of feedgrains by animals into animal protein for...

  11. Serial killer

    Contributor(s):: Erasmo de Oliveira

    Serial killerNot Just at the USA, it happens (dramatically), even at calm Sweden. One anonymous person, suddenly, stands up during a movie session and shoots persons with a machine gun. It can happens, literally, at anyone place, even at your neighborhood.Daily, we are pushed from side to side,...

  12. Maktub (was wrote)

    Contributor(s):: Erasmo de Oliveira

    Maktub (was wrote)What are the criteria to you choose your paw friend? May you really choose it or it comes to this world with the destiny of a history of life in partnership with you?We do not talk about religious praying, to be a source of Journalistic information. The idea is to spread the...

  13. (Your) Life's book

    Contributor(s):: Erasmo de Oliveira

    (Your) Life’s book Two pets in each home!ANIMALS ARE ANGELS and the fact is you came to this world with the RIGHT to have two of these angels at your home, so is the Nature’s law, so is the reality, the rest, is MATRIX, blablabla and political interest. And look that right is a...

  14. Dog Park Design: A Successful Southwest Dog Park

    Contributor(s):: James Harrison Melnick

    Dog parks are becoming increasingly popular in urban areas where little space is available for interactions with dogs off-leash. Dog parks should help the well-being of the owners and ensure a sense of security for themselves and their canines. However, a poorly designed dog park or dog-friendly...

  15. The use of electric pulse training aids (EPTAs) in companion animals

    Contributor(s):: Daniel Mills, Ernest Soulsby, Anne McBride, David Lamb, David Morton, Sean Wesley, Charles Deeming, L. Dixon, D. Foster

    There is currently little regulation of training and behaviour modification processes in the UK (CAWC 2008) besides measures enshrined in the Animal Welfare Act 2006 and a voluntary Code of Practice launched in 2010 (see: http://www.cawc.org.uk/080603.pdf). This Code is consistent with current UK...

  16. Studies to assess the effect of pet training aids specifically remote static pulse systems on the welfare of domestic dogs

    Contributor(s):: Jonathan Cooper, Hannah Wright, Daniel Mills, Rachel Casey, Emily Blackwell, Katja Van Driel, Jeff Lines

    This project assessed the welfare of dogs trained with pet training aids, specifically remote static pulse collar systems (e-collars). Previous work has focused on a very limited number of devices in a very limited range of contexts and the evidence of the impact of such devices on dog's...

  17. Studies to assess the effect of pet training aids, specifically remote static pulse systems, on the welfare of domestic dogs: field study of dogs in training

    Contributor(s):: Jonathan Cooper, Nina Cracknell, Jessica Hardiman, Daniel Mills

    The project had a single aim, namely to assess the impact of use of remote static pulse electric training aids (e-collars) during the training of dogs in comparison to dogs referred for similar behavioural problems but without e-collar training. The specific objective was to use appropriate...

  18. Animal Exposure, Asthma and Allergies

    Full-text: Available

    Contributor(s):: Felicia Trembath

    An estimated 62% of all United States households have one or more pet and more than 38% of households with pets have children under the age of 18 (Beck, 2010). Although the total number of pets in the United States does not seem to be increasing (AVMA, 2012), the relationship between people and...

  19. Human-Animal Trust as an Analog for Human-Robot Trust: A Review of Current Evidence

    Full-text: Available

    Contributor(s):: Deborah R. Billings, Kristin E. Schaefer, Jessie Y. C. Chen, Vivien Kocsis, Maria Barrera, Michelle Ferrer, Peter A. Hancock, Jacquelyn Cook

    Trust is an essential element required for effective human-robot teaming. Yet, experimental research examining human-robot trust in team interactions is at its infancy stage. Conducting empirical studies using live robots can be extremely difficult in terms of money, time, equipment...

  20. Pet-Keeping in American Material Culture and Identity Formation

    Full-text: Available

    Contributor(s):: Heather Frigiola

    Companion animals are a unique and complex part of American culture. They are frequently regarded as family members, yet legally they are considered property and are often obtained with an exchanged of money. As with other consumer goods, pets are culturally imbued with symbolism and are used by...