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  1. Investigations on feed intake and social behaviour of fattening pigs fed at an electronic feeding station

    Contributor(s):: Hoy, Steffen, Schamun, Sonja, Weirich, Carmen

    For the study from a total of 679 female pigs kept in a progeny test station in 64 groups mostly with 12 pigs each, the data from all visits at an electronic feeding station (EFS) were analysed. In 93 pigs (8 groups) all agonistic interactions at the EFS were recorded in continuous observations...

  2. Feather pecking genotype and phenotype affect behavioural responses of laying hens

    Contributor(s):: van der Eijk, Jerine A. J., Lammers, Aart, Li, Peiyun, Kjaer, Joergen B., Rodenburg, T. Bas

    Feather pecking (FP) is a major welfare and economic issue in the egg production industry. Behavioural characteristics, such as fearfulness, have been related to FP. However, it is unknown how divergent selection on FP affects fearfulness in comparison to no selection on FP. Therefore, we...

  3. Assessment of severity and progression of canine cognitive dysfunction syndrome using the CAnine DEmentia Scale (CADES)

    Contributor(s):: Madari, A., Farbakova, J., Katina, S., Smolek, T., Novak, P., Weissova, T., Novak, M., Zilka, N.

    Cognitive dysfunction syndrome (CDS) represents a group of symptoms related to the aging of the canine brain. These changes ultimately lead to a decline of memory function and learning abilities, alteration of social interaction, impairment of normal housetraining, changes in sleep-wake cycle and...

  4. Overview and critique of stages and periods in canine development

    Contributor(s):: Fox, M. W.

  5. Breed differences in everyday behaviour of dogs

    Contributor(s):: Asp, H. E., Fikse, W. F., Nilsson, K., Strandberg, E.

    The domestication of the dog and the ensuing breed creation has resulted in a plethora of dog breeds that differ not only in morphology but also in terms of behaviour. In addition, a majority of the dogs today are no longer utilized for their working ability, but are mainly kept as companion...

  6. Cognitive differences in horses performing locomotor versus oral stereotypic behaviour

    Contributor(s):: Kirsty, R., Andrew, H., Meriel, M. C., Catherine, H.

    Preliminary investigations reveal altered learning patterns in horses performing oral stereotypic behaviour which coincide with differential functioning of the basal ganglia group of brain structures. However, no studies to date have investigated similar differences in the equine locomotor...

  7. The backtest in pigs revisited - an analysis of intra-situational behaviour

    Contributor(s):: Zebunke, M., Repsilber, D., Nurnberg, G., Wittenburg, D., Puppe, B.

    The occurrence of different behavioural phenotypes in animals (regarding temperament and personality) has increasingly attracted the attention of scientists dealing with farm animal breeding, management and welfare. As part of the adaptation repertoire, coping behaviour describes how animals deal...

  8. Dominance rank is associated with body condition in outdoor-living domestic horses ( Equus caballus)

    Contributor(s):: Giles, S. L., Nicol, C. J., Harris, P. A., Rands, S. A.

    The aim of our study was to explore the association between dominance rank and body condition in outdoor group-living domestic horses, Equus caballus. Social interactions were recorded using a video camera during a feeding test, applied to 203 horses in 42 herds. Dominance rank was assigned to...

  9. The power of automated behavioural homecage technologies in characterizing disease progression in laboratory mice: a review

    Contributor(s):: Richardson, C. A.

    Behavioural changes that occur as animals become sick have been characterized in a number of species and include the less frequent occurrence of 'luxury behaviours' such as playing, grooming and socialization. 'Sickness behaviours' or behavioural changes following exposure to infectious agents,...

  10. Prevalence and antimicrogram of Staphylococcus intermedius group isolates from veterinary staff, companion animals, and the environment in veterinary hospitals in Korea

    Contributor(s):: Youn, JungHo, Yoon, JangWon, Koo, HyeCheong, Lim, SukKyung, Park, YongHo

  11. Effects of phenotypic characteristics on the length of stay of dogs at two no kill animal shelters

    Contributor(s):: Brown, W. P., Davidson, J. P., Zuefle, M. E.

    Adoption records from 2 no kill shelters in New York State were examined to determine how age, sex, size, breed group, and coat color influenced the length of stay (LOS) of dogs at these shelters. Young puppies had the shortest length of stay; LOS among dogs increased linearly as age increased....

  12. Genetically modified laboratory animals - what welfare problems do they face?

    Contributor(s):: Buehr, M., Hjorth, P. J., Hansen, A. K., Sandoe, P.

    In this article, we respond to public concern expressed about the welfare of genetically modified (GM) non-human animals. As a contribution to the debate on this subject, we attempt in this article to determine in what situations the practice of genetic modification in rodents may generate...

  13. Phenotype characterization and welfare assessment of transgenic rodents (mice)

    Contributor(s):: Mertens, C., Rulicke, T.

    Methods of transgenesis in vertebrate animals in the laboratory involve the stable addition or selective substitution of defined genes into the germline. Although there is a continuous and remarkable development in transgenic technology-the quality of transgenes, gene-targeting vectors, and...

  14. Visual discrimination of species in the dog, Canis familiaris

    Contributor(s):: Dérian, Dominique Autier, Chalvet-Monfray, Karine, Mounier, Luc, Ribolzi, Cindy, Deputte, Bertrand L.

  15. Stress measures in tail biters and bitten pigs in a matched case-control study

    Contributor(s):: Munsterhjelm, C., Brunberg, E., Heinonen, M., Keeling, L., Valros, A.

  16. Do dog owners perceive the clinical signs related to conformational inherited disorders as 'normal' for the breed? A potential constraint to improving canine welfare

    Contributor(s):: Packer, R. M. A., Hendricks, A., Burn, C. C.

  17. Relationship between childhood atopy and wheeze: what mediates wheezing in atopic phenotypes?

    Contributor(s):: Kurukulaaratchy, R. J., Matthews, S., Arshad, S. H.

  18. Phenotypic differences in behavior, physiology and neurochemistry between rats selected for tameness and for defensive aggression towards humans

    Contributor(s):: Albert, Frank W., Shchepina, Olesya, Winter, Christine, Römpler, Holger, Teupser, Daniel, Palme, Rupert, Ceglarek, Uta, Kratzsch, Jürgen, Sohr, Reinhard, Trut, Lyudmila N., Thiery, Joachim, Morgenstern, Rudolf, Plyusnina, Irina Z., Schöneberg, Torsten, Pääbo, Svante

  19. Behavior Genetics of Canine Aggression: Behavioral Phenotyping of Golden Retrievers by Means of an Aggression Test

    Contributor(s):: van den Berg, L., Schilder, M. B. H., Knol, B. W.

  20. Evaluation of the serotonergic genes htr1A, htr1B, htr2A, and slc6A4 in aggressive behavior of golden retriever dogs

    Contributor(s):: van den Berg, L., Vos-Loohuis, M., Schilder, M. B., van Oost, B. A., Hazewinkel, H. A., Wade, C. M., Karlsson, E. K., Lindblad-Toh, K., Liinamo, A. E., Leegwater, P. A.