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  1. Innate preference for native prey and personality implications in captive amur tigers

    Contributor(s):: Wang, Qi, Liu, Dan, Holyoak, Marcel, Jia, Teng, Yang, Shengfan, Liu, Xifeng, Kong, Xuanmin, Jiang, Guangshun

    Prey recognition is vital for predation and the survival of carnivores. In theory, carnivores recognize prey by instinct or learning. However, the instinct hypothesis has little support. In addition, it remains unknown if prey recognition capability correlates with personality. Here, we test if...

  2. Cannibalism management of jundiá fry, Rhamdia quelen: Behavior in heterogeneous batches fed on food with different particle sizes

    Contributor(s):: Costenaro-Ferreira, Cristiano, Oliveira, Rodrigo R. B., Oliveira, Paulo L. S., Hartmann, Gustavo J., Hammes, Fernanda B., Pouey, Juvêncio L. O. F., Piedras, Sérgio R. N.

    Fish reared in heterogeneous batches and fed on food with a very small particle size can practice cannibalism, because it is energetically more feasible. Jundiá is an omnivorous fish that exhibits heterogeneous growth and high cannibalism rate (CR) in the early stages of its life. Thus, to...

  3. Laugrand, Frédéric and Jarich Oosten: Hunters, Predators, and Prey: Inuit Perceptions of Animals

    Contributor(s):: Searles, Edmund

    2017Human Ecology456883-88403007839Springer Science & Business MediaNew Yorkhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10745-017-9955-9EnglishDepartment of Sociology and Anthropology, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA, USA ; Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Bucknell University,...

  4. The cry of a "New Born" | Susan Lingle | TEDxUniversityofWinnipeg

    Contributor(s):: Susan Lingle

    Mammals know a young creature in need when they hear it. Humans often respond to cries of infants from different species. What about other animals? Are the cries of different species similar enough for parents from one species to respond to the cries of another?Susan Lingle’s research...

  5. Avian diets in a saline ecosystem: Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    Contributor(s):: Roberts, Anthony J.

  6. Livestock predation by common leopard in Binsar Wildlife Sanctuary, India: human- wildlife conflicts and conservation issues

    Contributor(s):: Kala, Chandra Prakash, Kothari, Kishor Kumar

  7. Assessing the effectiveness of the Birdsbesafe anti-predation collar cover in reducing predation on wildlife by pet cats in Western Australia

    Contributor(s):: Hall, C. M., Fontaine, J. B., Bryant, K. A., Calver, M. C.

    Many pet cats hunt and, irrespective of whether or not this threatens wildlife populations, distressed owners may wish to curtail hunting while allowing their pets to roam. Therefore we evaluated the effectiveness of three patterned designs (simple descriptions being rainbow, red and yellow) of...

  8. Individual hunting behaviour and prey specialisation in the house cat Felis catus: implications for conservation and management

    Contributor(s):: Dickman, C. R., Newsome, T. M.

    Predators are often classed as prey specialists if they eat a narrow range of prey types, or as generalists if they hunt multiple prey types. Yet, individual predators often exhibit sex, size, age or personality-related differences in their diets that may alter the impacts of predation on...

  9. Converging on ancient bones: a review of the evidence for the close relatedness of humans ( Homo sapiens) and spotted hyenas ( Crocuta crocuta)

    Contributor(s):: Baynes-Rock, M.

    The majority of spotted hyena studies are conducted in places such as national parks and reserves where there are few humans present other than the researchers. I argue that this reflects a perception that "real" hyenas are those largely unaffected by contact with humans. This is at odds with...

  10. More than the kill: hunters' relationships with landscape and prey

    Contributor(s):: Arianne Carvalhedo Reis

    Through a discussion of the perceptions of hunters within a New Zealand tourism context, this paper explores how different perspectives of the ‘connection’ between hunter and prey are performed by participants and analysed by scholars using distinct ethical approaches....

  11. Explaining prehistoric variation in the abundance of large prey: a zooarchaeological analysis of deer and rabbit hunting along the Pecho Coast of Central California

    Contributor(s):: Brian F. Codding, Judith F. Porcasi, Terry L. Jones

    Three main hypotheses are commonly employed to explain diachronic variation in the relative abundance of remains of large terrestrial herbivores: (1) large prey populations decline as a function of anthro pogenic overexploitation; (2) large prey tends to increase as a result of increasing social...

  12. Consistent individual differences in the behavioural responsiveness of adult male cuttlefish ( Sepia officinalis)

    Contributor(s):: Carere, C., Grignani, G., Bonanni, R., Gala, M. della, Carlini, A., Angeletti, D., Cimmaruta, R., Nascetti, G., Mather, J. A.

    Consistent individual differences in clusters of behaviour (animal personalities) are being increasingly recognized by researchers of different disciplines, but studies on invertebrates are still scanty. In order to test for the presence of personality-like individual profiles we assessed the...

  13. Fossil dogs and wolves from Palaeolithic sties in Belgium, the Ukraine and Russia :osteometry, ancient DNA and stable isotopes

    Contributor(s):: Germonpré, Mietje

  14. Elements pour une typologie de la relation homme/animal sur des critères archeozoologiques

    Contributor(s):: Ducos, Pierre, Bökönyi, Sándor, Anreiter, Peter

  15. Pushed to the limit: food abundance determines tag-induced harm in penguins

    Contributor(s):: Wilson, R. P., Sala, J. E., Gomez-Laich, A., Ciancio, J., Quintana, F.

    The energetic costs of animal movement change with body condition, although the consequences of this for foraging efficiency are rarely considered. We deployed externally attached devices to Magellanic penguins ( Spheniscus magellanicus), known to increase the costs of swimming via increased drag...

  16. The effects of human age, group composition, and behavior on the likelihood of being injured by attacking pumas

    Contributor(s):: Coss, R. G., Fitzhugh, L. E., Schmid-Holmes, S., Kenyon, M. W., Etling, K.

    Documentation from the years 1890 to 2000 of 185 instances of pumas (Puma concolor) attacking humans in the United States and Canada has provided statistical evidence that pumas are less likely to kill or injure humans in certain circumstances. We identified incidents of fatal attacks, severe...

  17. Ranging characteristics of the domestic cat ( Felis catus) in an urban environment

    Contributor(s):: Thomas, R. L., Baker, P. J., Fellowes, M. D. E.

    In many countries, high densities of domestic cats ( Felis catus) are found in urban habitats where they have the potential to exert considerable predation pressure on their prey. However, little is known of the ranging behaviour of cats in the UK. Twenty cats in suburban Reading, UK, were fitted...

  18. Perceptions and attitudes of a Maasai community regarding wildlife-damage compensation, conservation, and the predators that prey on their livestock

    Contributor(s):: Rodriguez, Shari Lynn

    Worldwide, carnivore numbers are declining, largely due to conflict with humans. Wildlife-damage compensation schemes are one potential way to increase tolerance for carnivores while minimizing financial losses people incur when carnivores prey on livestock. The Predator Compensation Fund (PCF)...

  19. The positional quality of life and death: a theory of human-animal relations in animism

    Contributor(s):: Praet, I.

  20. "Gift giving" by wild bottle-nose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) to humans at a wild dolphin provisioning program, Tangalooma, Australia

    Contributor(s):: Holmes, B. J., Neil, D. T.