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  1. A case for a naturalistic perspective

    Contributor(s):: Paxton, D. W.

    This paper continues the debate on a unifying theory of the human-companion animal bond, begun in the first volume of Anthrozoos by Kidd and Kidd (1987:140-57). Research is cited in which the relationship between people and the dog is the case study. It is argued that the animal-animal model may...

  2. A case for a naturalistic perspective: response to Lawrence and Bekoff

    Contributor(s):: Paxton, D. W.

    The author responds to commentaries on his original paper noting that "The paper is about questions, not answers. The orthodoxanswer in urban animal management — responsible pet ownership — is really the target of the naturalistic perspective. The paper requests urban authorities to always ask...

  3. A case for a naturalistic perspective: response to Paxton

    Contributor(s):: Lawrence, E. A.

    The author "suggest[s] that one of the most appropriate existing explanations of the human–animal bond is the idea of biophilia — the presence of an innate tendency of human beings to relate to and affiliate with other forms of life."

  4. A case series of biting dogs: characteristics of the dogs, their behaviour, and their victims

    Contributor(s):: Guy, N. C., Luescher, U. A., Dohoo, S. E., Spangler, E., Miller, J. B., Dohoo, I. R., Bate, L. A.

    The characteristics of 227 biting dogs, their homes, and their victims were gathered in a detailed telephone survey of general veterinary clientele in the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island in 1996. All of the dogs had bitten either someone living in the...

  5. A case study employing operant conditioning to reduce stress of capture for red-bellied tamarins ( Saguinus labiatus )

    Contributor(s):: Owen, Y., Amory, J. R.

    Traditional techniques used to capture New World monkeys, such as net capture, can induce high levels of acute stress detrimental to welfare. Alternatively, training nonhuman animals via operant conditioning to voluntarily participate in husbandry and/or veterinary practices is accepted as a...

  6. A case study of orangutan and siamang behavior within a mixed-species zoo exhibit

    Contributor(s):: Pearson, E. L., Davis, J. M., Litchfield, C. A.

    This empirical case study assessed the behavior and welfare of 2 orangutans (Pongo abelii) and 2 siamangs (Symphalangus syndactylus) within a mixed-species zoo exhibit. The study used instantaneous scan-sampling to record behavior, location, and interspecies proximity over 174 hr and...

  7. A case study of primiparous maternal and infant gorilla ( Gorilla gorilla gorilla ) behavior

    Contributor(s):: Crosby, J. Y., Lukas, K. E.

    A primiparous mother and her infant were subjects of a longitudinal behavioral study at Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago, Illinois. From November 1998 to November 1999, we collected a total of 100 hr of focal nonhuman animal instantaneous point sampling and all occurrence data on the mother and her...

  8. A close keeper-nonhuman animal distance does not reduce undesirable behavior in contact yard goats and sheep

    Contributor(s):: Anderson, U. S., Maple, T. L., Bloomsmith, M. A.

    This study investigated the relation between zookeeper-nonhuman animal distance and the undesirable behaviour that goats and sheep exhibited toward visitors of Zoo Atlanta's (Georgia, USA) contact yard. It hypothesized that a close distance between keeper and animal would be associated with a...

  9. A companion animal in a work simulation: the roles of task difficulty and prior companion-animal guardianship in state anxiety

    Contributor(s):: Stewart, A., Strickland, O.

  10. A comparative approach to the study of Keeper-Animal Relationships in the zoo. (Special Issue: Zoo animal welfare.)

    Contributor(s):: Carlstead, K.

    Research on intensively farmed animals over the past 25 years has shown that human-animal interactions, by affecting the animal's fear of humans, can markedly limit the productivity and welfare of farm animals. This article begins to explore some of the factors that need to be considered to...

  11. A comparison of attachment levels of adopters of cats: fee-based adoptions versus free adoptions

    Contributor(s):: Weiss, E., Gramann, S.

    Nonhuman animal welfare professionals have been critical of adoption programs that do not charge a fee for adult cats, despite the high euthanasia rate for cats due to a reported lack of homes. The argument against the free cat adoptions cites a devaluation of the cat, which may affect the...

  12. A comparison of Bahamian cat and dog caregivers on New Providence

    Contributor(s):: Fielding, W. J.

    This article offers the first comparison of actions and attitudes of Afro-Caribbean caregivers who keep only cats or only dogs. A total of 330 Bahamian caregivers found that women primarily keep cats; men primarily keep dogs. Cat keepers were more attached to their companion animals but no more...

  13. A comparison of body size, coat condition and endoparasite diversity of wild Barbary macaques exposed to different levels of tourism

    Contributor(s):: Borg, C., Majolo, B., Qarro, M., Semple, S.

    Primate tourism is a rapidly growing industry with the potential to provide considerable conservation benefits. However, assessing the impact of tourists on the animals involved is vital to ensure that the conservation value of primate tourism is maximized. In this study, we compared body size,...

  14. A comparison of cell-mediated immune responses in rhesus macaques housed singly, in pairs, or in groups

    Contributor(s):: Schapiro, S. J., Nehete, P. N., Perlman, J. E., Sastry, K. J.

    A variety of psychosocial factors have been shown to influence immunological responses in laboratory primates. The present investigation examined the effects of social housing condition on cell-mediated immune responses, comparing rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in three housing conditions...

  15. A comparison of dog bite injuries in younger and older children treated in a pediatric emergency department

    Contributor(s):: Bernardo, L. M., Gardner, M. J., Rosenfield, R. L., Cohen, B., Pitetti, R.

    Objective: Dog bites account for a significant number of traumatic injuries in the paediatric population that often require medical treatment. Although agent, host, and environmental characteristics of dog bites have been well documented, no attempt has been made to compare these characteristics...

  16. A comparison of dog-dog and dog-human play behaviour

    Contributor(s):: Rooney, N. J., Bradshaw, J. W. S., Robinson, I. H.

    In an observational study of dogs being walked by their owners (402), dogs which were walked together, and had opportunities to play with one another, played with their owners with the same frequency as dogs being walked alone. This finding was supported by a questionnaire survey of 2585 dog...

  17. A comparison of empathy for humans and empathy for animals

    Contributor(s):: Angantyr, M., Eklund, J., Hansen, E. M.

    Although there is a substantial body of research on inter-human empathy and inter-animal empathy, there is a dearth of research comparing humans' empathic reactions to humans and animals. To address this issue, three experiments were conducted in which participants read a scenario about a human...

  18. A comparison of maltreated children and non-maltreated children on their experiences with animals - a Japanese study

    Contributor(s):: Yamazaki, S.

    Recently, studies in the United States, Canada, and Europe have shown that child abuse and animal abuse can coexist in the same household. The implications of these studies are that attention to animal abuse might lead to early detection of, and intervention in, child abuse. Although a promising...

  19. A comparison of positive reinforcement training techniques in owl and squirrel monkeys: time required to train to reliability

    Contributor(s):: Rogge, J., Sherenco, K., Malling, R., Thiele, E., Lambeth, S., Schapiro, S., Williams, L.

    Positive reinforcement training (PRT) techniques enhance the psychological well being of nonhuman primates by increasing the animal's control over his or her environment and desensitizing the animal to stressful stimuli. However, the literature on PRT in neotropical primates is limited. Here PRT...

  20. A comparison of the activity budgets of wild and captive Sulawesi crested black macaques ( Macaca nigra )

    Contributor(s):: Melfi, V. A., Feistner, A. T. C.

    One aim of environmental enrichment techniques is to replicate 'wild-like' behaviour in captivity. In this study, three captive troops of Sulawesi crested black macaques (M. nigra) in Chester, Jersey and Marwell Zoos, UK were each observed for 100 h in large naturalistic enclosures In May and...