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Resources (1-20 of 436)

  1. "Many Secrets Are Told Around Horses:" An Ethnographic Study of Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy

    Contributor(s):: Jennifer Van Tiem

    This dissertation presents an ethnography of equine-assisted psychotherapy (EAP) based on nine months of fieldwork at "Equine Healers," a non-profit organization in central Colorado that specialized in various therapeutic modalities associated with EAP. In bridging scholarly work around...

  2. A comparison of personality variables of pet owners and non-pet owners

    Contributor(s):: Chouinard, Betsy Ellen

  3. A descriptive study of the relation between domestic violence and pet abuse

    Contributor(s):: Weber, Claudia Virginia

  4. A multimodal investigation of the use of animal assisted therapy in a clinical interview

    Contributor(s):: Blender, Jennifer Amy

  5. A physiological basis for animal-facilitated psychotherapy

    Contributor(s):: Odendaal, Johannes Stefanus Joubert

  6. A Powerful Approach or the Power of Horses: Is Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy an Effective Technique or the Natural Effect of Horses?

    Contributor(s):: Jessica S. Iwachiw

    The lives of humans and animals have been intertwined through time immemorial, and in many instances the relationship between humans and animals has been thought to be good for human well-being. As such, it is not surprising that treatments for a wide range of ailments, from physical to...

  7. A psychotherapeutic riding program: An existential theater for healing

    Contributor(s):: Karol, Jane M.

  8. A qualitative study of companion animal loss and grief resolution

    Contributor(s):: Stefan, Faye Marlene

  9. A qualitative/quantitative study of human bereavement responses to the death of an animal companion: Educational implications, resources, guidelines and strategies. (Volumes I-III)

    Contributor(s):: McMahon, Sharon May (Girling)

  10. A study of animal-assisted therapy and weekday placement of a social therapy dog in an Alzheimer's disease unit

    Contributor(s):: Martin, Daun Adair

  11. A survey of psychologists' attitudes, opinions, and clinical experiences with animal abuse

    Contributor(s):: Nelson, Pauline

  12. Adolescent bereavement and pet death: Linkages among bonding, bereavement and gender

    Contributor(s):: Brown, Brenda H.

  13. Adolescents' perceptions of human-animal relationships

    Contributor(s):: Okoniewski, Lisa Anne

  14. Adult adjustment to the death of a companion animal: The roles of confiding and additional pet ownership

    Contributor(s):: Gerwolls, Marilyn Kay

  15. Adult pet attachments

    Contributor(s):: Ferry, Louise A.

  16. Alleviating equines: Investigating the hypothesized mechanisms of change in equine assisted psychotherapy

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Korell-Roch, Kathy L.

    Animal Assisted Therapy research was integrated to develop the Tri-Level Mechanisms of Change (TLMC) Conceptualization, which is a comprehensive theoretical framework hypothesizing how Equine Assisted Psychotherapy produces psychological change. TLMC hypothesizes that the strength of human...

  17. An analysis of psychological processes of companion dogs on humans

    | Contributor(s):: Ferreyra, Alejandro Jorge

  18. An animal-assisted therapy program for children and adolescents with emotional and behavioral disorders

    | Contributor(s):: Drawe, Heather L.

  19. An evaluation of equine-assisted wellness in those suffering from catastrophic loss and emotional fluctuations

    | Contributor(s):: Graham, John Richard

  20. An evaluation of the benefits of a companion animal to chronic psychiatric inpatients (pet-facilitated therapy)

    | Contributor(s):: Del Monaco, Margaret Mary