The HABRI Central Team continues to monitor emerging research and information about the COVID-19 pandemic. Visit our collection of resources, https://habricentral.org/features/covid-19 close

 
You are here: Home / Tags / Reproduction / All Categories

Tags: Reproduction

All Categories (21-40 of 231)

  1. Movements, habitat selection, associations, and survival of giant Canada goose broods in central Tennessee

    Contributor(s):: Dunton, E. M., Combs, D. L.

  2. Evaluation of the sexual behavior and testosterone concentrations of Mangalarga Marchador stallions

    Contributor(s):: Rua, M. A. S., Quirino, C. R., Bastos, R., Bartholazzi Junior, A., Santoro, P. N., Ribeiro, M. da S., Matos, L. F., Barreto, M. A. P.

    Assessing the sexual behavior of stallions is extremely important because sexual behavior is linked to reproductive efficiency. The objective of this study was to evaluate the sexual behavior, testosterone concentration and libido of Mangalarga Marchador stallions from northern Rio de Janeiro...

  3. How to train a dog to detect cows in heat-training and success

    Contributor(s):: Johnen, D., Heuwieser, W., Fischer-Tenhagen, C.

    Efficient and accurate estrus detection is a key management factor determining acceptable reproductive performance in dairy herds. Previous studies have shown that dogs can differentiate between vaginal mucus samples of cows in estrus and vaginal mucus samples of cows in diestrus with an accuracy...

  4. Mate choice, maternal investment and implications for ostrich welfare in a farming environment

    Contributor(s):: Bonato, M., Cherry, M. I., Cloete, S. W. P.

    At present, the ostrich industry is inefficient, on account of being characterised by inadequate egg production, high embryo mortality, poor chick survival and suboptimal growth rates. However, as ostrich farming commenced only in the mid 19th century in South Africa, farmed ostriches have had a...

  5. Behaviour of pre-pubertal gilts and its relationship to farrowing behaviour in conventional farrowing crates and loose-housed pens

    Contributor(s):: Ison, S. H., Wood, C. M., Baxter, E. M.

    Individual variation in the reproductive performance of sows has the potential for greater negative impacts in loose-farrowing systems. Therefore, the ability to select gilts that will perform well would be a major advantage. This study investigated the behaviour of gilts during pre-pubertal...

  6. Achieving a Concensus on Dog Control Strategies: A Brief Primer

    Contributor(s):: D.B. Wilkins

    The welfare arguments surrounding dog ownership may not stimulate the same passionate fervor as those relating to the use of animals in experiments, factory farming, or the hunting of live animals with hounds, but nevertheless, they are matters of real concern to most welfare organizations. The...

  7. Pet Population Control

    Contributor(s):: Tonya Higgins, Mauricio Pineda

    Conservative estimates indicate that there are between 65 and 110 million cats and dogs in the U.S. today and that about 200,000,000 are born annually (2,000-10,000 per hour). To provide a home for every dog and cat, each household would need to own 30 pets. This overpopulation of companion...

  8. A Report on Animal Overpopulation: Breeding Surplus Dogs and Cats Causes Suffering

    Contributor(s):: The Humane Society Of The United States

    Overbreeding has created a surplus of nearly 50 million dogs and cats. These animals are unwanted and homeless. Some of them--the lucky ones--will get a quick, merciful death at humane society shelters. Most, however, haven't even the hope of being reached and protected from suffering in the...

  9. HSUS Uncovers Cruel Puppy Mills

    Contributor(s):: The Humane Society Of The United States

    It is estimated that puppy mills grind out more than half a million puppies every year to be sold almost exclusively in pet stores. But it is not only puppies--who, after all, escape the squalor and crowding after six or seven weeks that suffer. Of equal concern is the fate of the puppy mill...

  10. Special Report on Controlling America's Pet Population

    Contributor(s):: The Humane Society Of The United States

    HSUS estimates that public and private animal control programs cost the nation as much as $500 million a year. Much of this expense is required for the feeding and care of unwanted animals during the 5 to 10 days they are held for adoption, killing the 80% that are not adopted or redeemed, and...

  11. Solving the Pet Overpopulation Problem

    Contributor(s):: The Humane Society Of The United States

    Because of the short pregnancies and large litters of dogs and cats, one individual female with all her female offspring reproducing similarly can be the source of over 4,000 new lives within seven years. Some of these animals will find homes complete with laps to sit on and fireplaces to enjoy,...

  12. A Reproductive Management Program for an Urban Population of Eastern Grey Kangaroos (Macropus giganteus)

    Full-text: Available

    Contributor(s):: Andrew Tribe, Jon Hanger, Ian J. Mcdonald, Jo Loader, Ben J. Nottidge, Jeff J. McKee, Clive J.c. Phillips

    Traditionally, culling has been the expedient, most common, and in many cases, the only tool used to control free-ranging kangaroo populations. We applied a reproductive control program to a population of eastern grey kangaroos confined to a golf course in South East Queensland. The program aimed...

  13. Robbing PETA to Spay Paul: Do Animal Rights Include Reproductive Rights?

    Contributor(s):: David Boonin

    Let me begin with a confession. My papers are often praised more for their titles than for their contents. At a job interview a few years ago, I was told that if I didn’t have a future in philosophy (hardly the words one wants to hear during a job interview), the quality of my titles...

  14. Early transfer of mated females into the maternity unit reduces stress and increases maternal care in farm mink

    Contributor(s):: Malmkvist, J., Palme, R.

    Mated mammals on farms are typically transferred to another housing environment prior to delivery. We investigated whether the timing of this transfer - EARLY (Day -36), INTERMEDIATE (Day -18), or LATE (Day -3) relative to the expected day of birth (Day 0) - affects maternal stress, maternal care...

  15. Effects of stage of gestation at mixing on aggression, injuries and stress in sows

    Contributor(s):: Stevens, B., Karlen, G. M., Morrison, R., Gonyou, H. W., Butler, K. L., Kerswell, K. J., Hemsworth, P. H.

    Confinement of breeding sows to stalls is a controversial welfare issue, and there is a worldwide move to house gestating sows in groups. We examined the effects of day of mixing following insemination on aggression, injuries and stress in sows. A total of 800 sows were used in this experiment...

  16. Group composition for fattening entire male pigs under enriched housing conditions - influences on behaviour, injuries and boar taint compounds

    Contributor(s):: Holinger, M., Fruh, B., Hillmann, E.

    In organic farming, the production of pork from entire male pigs seems to be the most promising alternative to castration, as organic animal husbandry aims at high standards of animal welfare and elimination of mutilations. However, previous research on behaviour of entire male pigs was mostly...

  17. The potential of Social Network Analysis as a tool for the management of zoo animals

    Contributor(s):: Rose, P. E., Croft, D. P.

    Social Network Analysis (SNA) enables the fine scale of animal sociality and population structure to be quantified. SNA is widely applied to questions relating to behavioural ecology but has seen little use in the application to zoo animal management, despite its clear potential. Investment in...

  18. Making kin out of others in Amazonia

    Contributor(s):: Vilaça, Aparecida

  19. Cloning the wild mouflon

    Contributor(s):: Heatherington, Tracey

  20. Dimension humaine et monde animal dans la culture populaire serbe

    Contributor(s):: Pavković, Nikola F.