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  1. A "how-to" guide for designing judgment bias studies to assess captive animal welfare

    Contributor(s):: Bethell, E. J.

    Robust methods to assess nonhuman animal emotion are essential for ensuring good welfare in captivity. Cognitive bias measures such as the judgment bias task have recently emerged as promising tools to assess animal emotion. The simple design and objective response measures make judgment bias...

  2. A persistent abnormal repetitive behaviour in a false water cobra (Hydrodynastes gigas)

    Contributor(s):: Michaels, C. J., Gini, B. F., Clifforde, L.

  3. A Review of Common Diseases in Captive Reptiles

    Contributor(s):: Michael Lindeen, John Haupert

    Reptiles, as both pets and as laboratory animals, are becoming more popular. The small "dime store" turtle or red eared turtle has been popular for a long time, but making their way into homes are such reptiles as boa constrictors, garter snakes, black snakes, box turtles, caiman,...

  4. A survey of pet- and non-pet-owning Swedish adolescents: demographic differences and health issues

    | Contributor(s):: Mullersdorf, M., Granstrom, F., Tillgren, P.

    The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of pet ownership in adolescents in Sweden and establish whether any gender, age or health-related differences exist between those who own pets and those who do not. In addition, the study aimed to explore the relationships between species of...

  5. All creatures great and minute: a public policy primer for companion animal zoonoses

    | Contributor(s):: Reaser, J. K., Clark, E. E., Jr., Meyers, N. M.

    Approximately 63% of US households have at least one pet, a large percentage of which are considered family members. Pet owners can derive substantial physical and psychological benefits from interaction with companion animals. However, pet ownership is not without risks; zoonotic diseases are...

  6. An Attempt at Captive Breeding of the Endangered Newt Echinotriton andersoni, from the Central Ryukyus in Japan

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Takeshi Igawa, Hirotaka Sugawara, Miyuki Tado, Takuma Nishitani, Atsushi Kurabayashi, Mohammed Mafizul Islam, Shohei Oumi, Seiki Katsuren, Tamotsu Fujii, Masayuki Sumida

    Anderson’s crocodile newt (Echinotriton andersoni) is distributed in the Central Ryukyu Islands of southern Japan, but environmental degradation and illegal collection over the last several decades have devastated the local populations. It has therefore been listed as a class B1 endangered...

  7. Animal assisted therapy. Using exotic animals in therapy

    | Contributor(s):: Winkle, M. Y., Van Dame, V. R., Levenson, J.

  8. Animal instincts

    | Contributor(s):: Allen, Daniel

  9. Animals and Neolithic schematic art in southern France: Between the real and the ideal

    | Contributor(s):: Hameau, Philippe

  10. Annual intake trends of a large urban animal rehabilitation centre in South Africa: a case study

    | Contributor(s):: Wimberger, K., Downs, C. T.

    Each year, worldwide, large numbers of wild animals are taken to rehabilitation centres for treatment, care and release. Although analysis of intake records may provide valuable insight into the threats and impacts to wildlife, there are few such published reports. Four years of intake records...

  11. Are you treating all creatures great and small?

    | Contributor(s):: Cope, I.

    The exotic pet turning up in the waiting room of the local practice is a growing trend. Their owners expect veterinarians to be able to see and triage most species, but is this a fair expectation? Should vets be able to see and treat all creatures great and small or are those days of James...

  12. Assessing the effectiveness of the Birdsbesafe anti-predation collar cover in reducing predation on wildlife by pet cats in Western Australia

    | Contributor(s):: Hall, C. M., Fontaine, J. B., Bryant, K. A., Calver, M. C.

    Many pet cats hunt and, irrespective of whether or not this threatens wildlife populations, distressed owners may wish to curtail hunting while allowing their pets to roam. Therefore we evaluated the effectiveness of three patterned designs (simple descriptions being rainbow, red and yellow) of...

  13. Attitudes towards dogs and other "pets" in Roseau, Dominica

    | Contributor(s):: Alie, K., Davis, B. W., Fielding, W. J., Galindo Maldonado, F.

    This paper reports on the findings of interviews on attitudes towards pet care with 241 heads of households in Roseau, the capital of The Commonwealth of Dominica. Parrots and dogs were the two most preferred animals, and snakes were least liked; however, few respondents (0.8

  14. Behavioral considerations of headstarting as a conservation strategy for endangered Caribbean rock iguanas.

    | Contributor(s):: Alberts, A. C.

    Headstarting animals in captivity prior to reintroduction into the wild has proven to be a valuable strategy in the conservation of critically endangered Caribbean rock iguanas (genus Cyclura). However, a major concern associated with headstarting programs is that some animals reared in a captive...

  15. Blind Trading: A Literature Review of Research Addressing the Welfare of Ball Pythons in the Exotic Pet Trade

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jennah Green, Emma Coulthard, David Megson, John Norrey, Laura Norrey, Jennifer K. Rowntree, Jodie Bates, Becky Dharmpaul, Mark Auliya, Neil D’Cruze

    Extensive numbers of Ball pythons are caught, bred, traded and subsequently kept in captivity across the world as part of the exotic pet industry. Despite their widespread availability as pets, relatively little is known about the potential welfare challenges affecting them. We reviewed the...

  16. Bushmen and herpetofauna : notes on amphibians and reptiles traded in bush-meat markets of local people in the Niger delta (Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria)

    | Contributor(s):: Akani, Godfrey C., Luiselli, Luca, Angelici, Francesco M., Politano, Edoardo

  17. Clinical digest. Reptiles kept as pets pose salmonella risk to young children

  18. Compendium of measures to prevent disease associated with animals in public settings, 2009 National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians, Inc. (NASPHV)

    Certain venues encourage or permit the public to be in contact with animals, resulting in millions of human-animal interactions each year. These settings include county or state fairs, petting zoos, animal swap meets, pet stores, zoologic institutions, circuses, carnivals, educational farms,...

  19. Computer-aided pattern recognition of large reptiles as a noninvasive application to identify individuals

    | Contributor(s):: Moro, D., MacAulay, I.

    For large species, the capture and handling of individuals in capture-mark-recapture studies introduces nonhuman animal welfare issues associated with handling, physical marking, and possible wounding due to tag loss. The use of photographic identification for these species offers an alternative...

  20. Could empathy for animals have been an adaptation in the evolution of Homo sapiens ?

    | Contributor(s):: Bradshaw, J. W. S., Paul, E. S.

    In humans, empathy has emotional and cognitive components, both of which are linked to caring and nurturant behaviour. Variations in each of these facets of empathy were likely to have been accessible to natural selection during the evolution of Homo, although the likely details of their...