You are here: Home / Tags / Rodents / Journal Articles

Tags: Rodents

Resources (41-60 of 386)

  1. The power of automated behavioural homecage technologies in characterizing disease progression in laboratory mice: a review

    Contributor(s):: Richardson, C. A.

    Behavioural changes that occur as animals become sick have been characterized in a number of species and include the less frequent occurrence of 'luxury behaviours' such as playing, grooming and socialization. 'Sickness behaviours' or behavioural changes following exposure to infectious agents,...

  2. Are you treating all creatures great and small?

    Contributor(s):: Cope, I.

    The exotic pet turning up in the waiting room of the local practice is a growing trend. Their owners expect veterinarians to be able to see and triage most species, but is this a fair expectation? Should vets be able to see and treat all creatures great and small or are those days of James...

  3. You're Never Too Old for Pets

    OIder people and youngsters share an affinity for animals. A few 4- Hers in Yuma County rediscover that every month when they visit the Desert Manor Convalescent Center. The weather was warm and inviting when the 4 -11 teens recently brought horses to the center's parking lot. Clair...

  4. Genies of the Opacity of Human-Animal Relationships in Kakande, Guinea

    Contributor(s):: Vincent Leblan, Blandine Bricka

    This article investigates what it means for some inhabitants of northwestern Guinea to relate to the realm of 'nature' and, more specifically, to animals that are categorized as 'wild' by Westerners. The materials analysed in this article include villagers' narratives about...

  5. A Quantitative Prioritisation of Human and Domestic Animal Pathogens in Europe

    Full-text: Available

    Contributor(s):: K. Marie McIntyre, Christian Setzkorn, Philip J. Hepworth, Serge Morand, Andrew P. Morse, Matthew Baylis

    Disease or pathogen risk prioritisations aid understanding of infectious agent impact within surveillance or mitigation and biosecurity work, but take significant development. Previous work has shown the H-(Hirsch-)index as an alternative proxy. We present a weighted risk analysis describing...

  6. Domestication effects on behavioural traits and learning performance: comparing wild cavies to guinea pigs

    Contributor(s):: Brust, V., Guenther, A.

    The domestication process leads to a change in behavioural traits, usually towards individuals that are less attentive to changes in their environment and less aggressive. Empirical evidence for a difference in cognitive performance, however, is scarce. Recently, a functional linkage between an...

  7. Evaluation of microwave energy as a humane stunning technique based on electroencephalography (EEG) of anaesthetised cattle

    Contributor(s):: Rault, J. L., Hemsworth, P. H., Cakebread, P. L., Mellor, D. J., Johnson, C. B.

    Humane slaughter implies that an animal experiences minimal pain and distress before it is killed. Stunning is commonly used to induce insensibility but can lead to variable results or be considered unsatisfactory by some religious groups. Microwave energy can induce insensibility in rats, and...

  8. Housing condition and nesting experience do not affect the Time to Integrate to Nest Test (TINT)

    Contributor(s):: Rock, M. L., Karas, A. Z., Gallo, M. S., Pritchett-Corning, K., Gaskill, B. N.

    Managing and assessing well-being in laboratory mice ( Mus musculus) is both challenging and necessary. Assessments intended to detect negative welfare states in mice are usually performed via observation of animals in the home cage, but a substantial amount of time and skill may be required to...

  9. Walking the dog: explorations and negotiations of species differences

    Contributor(s):: Erika Cudworth

    For Donna Haraway, everyday lives, experiences and observations of other species are crucial in helping us theorize animals. She insists that humans and dogs are both companion species, constituted in relation: ‚in those knots with actual animals and people looking back at each other‛. 2...

  10. Companion Animals: A New Awareness

    Contributor(s):: Lee Carpenter, Loren A. Will

    Seemingly all of a sudden, animal companions are our partners in health! Not just as carcasses to be chipped and chunked, fileted and skewered to fill our gullet, or to be stripped, tanned, and polished to adorn our egos and provide treads. Rather now as seltzers and herbs to soothe man's...

  11. Genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii in animals and humans

    Contributor(s):: L. David Sibley, Asis Khan, James W. Ajioka, Benjamin M. Rosenthal

    Toxoplasma gondii is one of the most widespread parasites of domestic, wild, and companion animals, and it also commonly infects humans. Toxoplasma gondii has a complex life cycle. Sexual development occurs only in the cat gut, while asexual replication occurs in many vertebrate hosts. These...

  12. The Care of Pets Within Child Abusing Families

    Contributor(s):: Elizabeth DeViney, Jeffery Dickert, Randall Lockwood

    The treatment of animals was surveyed in 53 families in which child abuse had occurred. Patterns of pet ownership, attitudes towards pets and quality of veterinary care did not differ greatly from comparable data from the general public. However, abuse of pets by a family member had taken place...

  13. Plague: infections of companion animals and opportunities for intervention

    Contributor(s):: Oyston, Petra C. F., Williamson, Diane

  14. Perceptions among university students in Seville (Spain) of the rabbit as livestock and as a companion animal

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: González-Redondo, P., Contreras-Chacón, G. M.

  15. The use of cage enrichment to reduce male mouse aggression

    | Contributor(s):: Ambrose, N., Morton, D. B.

    The complete cleaning of cages has been shown to reduce the level of intermale aggression in mice. This study investigated the effects of the addition of enrichment objects on post cage-cleaning aggression in male BALB/c mice. Enrichment objects were found to significantly reduce aggressive...

  16. Laboratory rodent welfare: thinking outside the cage

    | Contributor(s):: Balcombe, J.

    This commentary presents the case against housing rats and mice in laboratory cages; the commentary bases its case on their sentience, natural history, and the varied detriments of laboratory conditions. The commentary gives 5 arguments to support this position: (a) rats and mice have a high...

  17. The effects of chronic exposure to common bedding materials on the metabolic rate and overall health of male CD-1 mice

    | Contributor(s):: Becker, C. E., Mathur, C. F., Rehnberg, B. G.

    Anecdotes and personal Web pages claim that cedar and pine beddings cause respiratory distress in rodents, although no previous research could be found to support these claims. There have, however, been published studies of respiratory distress in cedar and pine mill workers. That research links...

  18. Genetically modified laboratory animals - what welfare problems do they face?

    | Contributor(s):: Buehr, M., Hjorth, P. J., Hansen, A. K., Sandoe, P.

    In this article, we respond to public concern expressed about the welfare of genetically modified (GM) non-human animals. As a contribution to the debate on this subject, we attempt in this article to determine in what situations the practice of genetic modification in rodents may generate...

  19. Use of PVC conduits by rats of various strains and ages housed singly and in pairs

    | Contributor(s):: Galef, B. G., Jr., Sorge, R. E.

    This study observed the frequency with which laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus) entered polyvinylchloride (PVC) conduits placed in their cages to provide environmental enrichment. The use of PVC conduits by Norway rats varied with subjects' strain, age, sex and housing condition. Adult male...

  20. Environmental Enrichment for Laboratory Rodents: Animal Welfare and the Methods of Science

    | Contributor(s):: Galef Jr, Bennett G.

    Focuses on the environmental enrichment of laboratory rodents. Importance of objective and measurable goals in the environmental enrichment program for rodents; Psychological welfare of rodents as the main goal of most environmental enrichment procedures; Effects of environmental enrichment on...