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  1. Pigs' skin lesions at weaning are primarily caused by standoff and being bullied instead of unilateral active attack at the individual level

    Contributor(s):: Liu, Mingzheng, Xu, Qinglei, Zhao, Jing, Guo, Yanli, Zhang, Chunlei, Cheng, Meng, Zhao, Xianle, Schinckel, Allan P., Zhou, Bo

    2022Applied Animal Behaviour Science2471055560168-159110.1016/j.applanim.2022.105556text

  2. Determination of static space requirements for finishing bulls based on image analysis

    Contributor(s):: Volkmann, N., Stracke, J., Rauterberg, S. L., Spindler, B., Kemper, N.

  3. Duration of confinement and pen-type affect health-related measures of welfare in lactating sows

    Contributor(s):: Maschat, K., Dolezal, M., Leeb, C., Heidinger, B., Winckler, C., Oczak, M., Baumgartner, J.

  4. Scratch the surface: Histopathology of foot-pad dermatitis in turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo)

    Contributor(s):: Stracke, J., Klotz, D., Wohlsein, P., Dohring, S., Volkmann, N., Kemper, N., Spindler, B.

  5. Case control study on environmental, nutritional and management-based risk factors for tail-biting in long-tailed pigs

    Contributor(s):: Kallio, P. A., Janczak, A. M., Valros, A. E., Edwards, S. A., Heinonen, M.

  6. Development and refinement o f three animal-based broiler chicken welfare indicators

    Contributor(s):: Souza, A. P. O., Soriano, V. S., Schnaider, M. A., Rucinque, D. S., Molento, C. F. M.

  7. Pre-weaning socialization and environmental enrichment affect life-long response to regrouping in commercially-reared pigs

    Contributor(s):: Ko, Heng-Lun, Chong, Qiai, Escribano, Damián, Camerlink, Irene, Manteca, Xavier, Llonch, Pol

    Weaning and other regrouping events as routine work in commercial farms cause stress to pigs and compromise their welfare. Several studies found positive outcomes to mitigate weaning stress when piglets were socialized (i.e. co-mingled) or raised with enrichment materials in research settings....

  8. Different regrouping schedules in semi group-housed rabbit does: Effects on agonistic behaviour, stress and lesions

    Contributor(s):: Braconnier, Michèle, Gómez, Yamenah, Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G.

    Although group housing of naturally social animals like rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is desirable for ethical reasons, social conflicts can significantly increase the risk for injuries as well as stress incidences and negatively affect their welfare. A common housing system in Switzerland is...

  9. Interaction between sows’ aggressiveness post mixing and skin lesions recorded several weeks later

    Contributor(s):: Tönepöhl, Björn, Appel, Anne K., Voß, Barbara, König von Borstel, Uta, Gauly, Matthias

    Group housing of pigs leads inevitably to more or less serious agonistic interactions during the establishment of the social rank order of the group. In order to reduce the number of severe agonistic interactions and thus the negative effects on well-being and performance, the use of genetic...

  10. The influence of a magnesium rich marine supplement on behaviour, salivary cortisol levels, and skin lesions in growing pigs exposed to acute stressors

    Contributor(s):: O’Driscoll, Keelin, Teixeira, Dayane Lemos, O’Gorman, Denise, Taylor, Stephen, Boyle, Laura Ann

    Pigs in intensive production systems typically experience multiple acute stressors which can have a negative impact on their welfare. This study investigated whether a magnesium (Mg) rich marine extract (SUPPLEMENT) could reduce the negative effects of mixing and an out-of-feed event on pig...

  11. Effects of group stability on aggression, stress and injuries in breeding rabbits

    Contributor(s):: Andrist, Claude A., Bigler, Lotti M., Würbel, Hanno, Roth, Beatrice A.

    On Swiss rabbit breeding farms, group-housed does are usually kept singly for 12 days around parturition to avoid pseudogravidity, double litters and deleterious fighting for nests. After this isolation phase there is usually an integration of new group members. Here we studied whether keeping...

  12. Effect of marginal environmental and social enrichment during rearing on pigs’ reactions to novelty, conspecifics and handling

    Contributor(s):: Tönepöhl, Björn, Appel, Anne K., Welp, Stephan, Voß, Barbara, König von Borstel, Uta, Gauly, Matthias

    The rearing environment of farmed animals can affect their behaviour when handled, and therefore needs to be taken into account when selecting for traits such as docility. Therefore, 126 German Landrace and Pietrain×German Landrace pigs were reared in two different production environments (barren...

  13. Agonistic behaviour after mixing in pigs under commercial farm conditions

    Contributor(s):: Stukenborg, Andreas, Traulsen, Imke, Puppe, Birger, Presuhn, Ulrich, Krieter, Joachim

    The aim of the study was to investigate agonistic behaviour of pigs after regrouping pigs under commercial sow farm conditions. The behavioural patterns were observed over a 48-h period, directly after weaning (PIG-28; n=647) and 40 days later (growing pigs, PIG-68; n=224). Agonistic interactions...

  14. Suckling behaviour and health parameters of sows and piglets in free-farrowing pens

    Contributor(s):: Lohmeier, R. Y., Gimberg-Henrici, C. G. E., Burfeind, O., Krieter, J.

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of free-farrowing pens and farrowing crates on the health parameters and the suckling behaviour of sows and their piglets, which were housed in farrowing crates (FC; n = 127) and in free-farrowing pens (FP; n = 121). All sows were...

  15. Early socialisation as a strategy to increase piglets’ social skills in intensive farming conditions

    Contributor(s):: Salazar, Laura C., Ko, Heng-Lun, Yang, Chung-Hsuan, Llonch, Lourdes, Manteca, Xavier, Camerlink, Irene, Llonch, Pol

    Socialisation is a process in which animals interact with unfamiliar conspecifics, that allows them to develop their social abilities. Socialisation has been proposed as a method in pig husbandry to increase piglets’ social skills and reduce conspecific aggression, which is a major welfare issue...

  16. Relationships among aggressiveness, fearfulness and response to humans in finisher pigs

    Contributor(s):: O’Malley, Carly I., Wurtz, Kaitlin E., Steibel, Juan P., Bates, Ronald O., Ernst, Catherine W., Siegford, Janice M.

    Mixing unfamiliar pigs is common in modern production, resulting in intense aggression potentially leading to injury and stress. One solution is breeding against aggressiveness. However, in order to anticipate the consequences of such selection, we need to understand how individual aggressiveness...

  17. Aggressive behaviour at regrouping is a poor predictor of chronic aggression in stable social groups

    Contributor(s):: Turner, Simon P., Nevison, Ian M., Desire, Suzanne, Camerlink, Irene, Roehe, Rainer, Ison, Sarah H., Farish, Marianne, Jack, Mhairi C., D’Eath, Richard B.

    Commercial pigs globally are routinely mixed into new social groups. This results in regrouping aggression predominantly during the first 24h which compromises welfare and productivity. Chronic aggression persists thereafter and is also undesirable. Management strategies are needed that reduce...

  18. Associations between the dominance status and sexual development, skin lesions or feeding behaviour of intact male pigs

    Contributor(s):: Parois, Severine, Larzul, Catherine, Prunier, Armelle

    In boars, social relationships could influence pubertal development and feeding behaviour. The objectives of the present study were to determine the relationships between behaviour (agonistic, mounting and feeding behaviours), plasma sex steroids (oestradiol, testosterone) and fat androstenone. A...

  19. Effects of lameness treatment for claw horn lesions on lying behaviour in dairy cows

    Contributor(s):: Miguel-Pacheco, Giuliana G., Thomas, Heather J., Kaler, Jasmeet, Craigon, Jim, Huxley, Jonathan N.

    Lameness affects lying behaviour in dairy cattle, increasing total lying time and the number of lying bouts. However, there is limited information about the effect of lameness treatment on dairy cow behaviour. This study investigated the effect of four lameness treatments on lying behaviour...

  20. A welfare assessment scoring system for working equids—A method for identifying at risk populations and for monitoring progress of welfare enhancement strategies (trialed in Egypt)

    | Contributor(s):: Ali, Ahmed B. A., El Sayed, Mohammed A., Matoock, Mohamed Y., Fouad, Manal A., Heleski, Camie R.

    There are an estimated 112 million horses, donkeys and mules (i.e., working equids) in developing regions of the world. Though their roles are often fundamental to the well-being of the families they work for, their welfare is often severely compromised due to the limited resources and/or...