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  1. Independent living with mobility restrictions: older people's perceptions of their out-of-home mobility

    Contributor(s):: Luoma-Halkola, Henna, Häikiö, Liisa

  2. Exploring the social network of European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) in captivity

    Contributor(s):: Brucks, Désirée, Drews, Barbara, Ulbrich, Susanne E.

  3. The structure and temporal changes in brokerage typologies applied to a dynamic sow herd

    Contributor(s):: Jowett, Sarah, Barker, Zoe, Amory, Jonathan

    2022Applied Animal Behaviour Science2461055090168-159110.1016/j.applanim.2021.105509text

  4. The Spectacular Environmentalism of Cecil the Lion

    Contributor(s):: McCubbin, Sandra Gillian

  5. When Therapy Dogs Visit College Students, Is It Therapy?

    Contributor(s):: Fleming, Colleen M.

  6. Proximity between horses in large groups in an open stable system – Analysis of spatial and temporal proximity definitions

    Contributor(s):: Hildebrandt, Frederik, Büttner, Kathrin, Salau, Jennifer, Krieter, Joachim, Czycholl, Irena

  7. A review of factors affecting the welfare of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    Contributor(s):: Santurtun, E., Broom, D. M., Phillips, C. J. C.

  8. The stability of social prominence and influence in a dynamic sow herd: A social network analysis approach

    Contributor(s):: Jowett, Sarah, Amory, Jonathan

  9. Social proximities of developing gorilla males (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) in European zoos: The consequences of castration and social composition

    Contributor(s):: Létang, Benoit, Mulot, Baptiste, Alerte, Vanessa, Bionda, Thomas, Britton, Lisa, ter Meulen, Tjerk, Szánthó, János, Guéry, Jean-Pascal, Sueur, Cédric

  10. Human caregivers are integrated social partners for captive chimpanzees

    Contributor(s):: Funkhouser, J. A., Mayhew, J. A., Mulcahy, J. B., Sheeran, L. K.

  11. Evaluating the social structure of captive Rothschild’s giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis rothschildi): Relevance to animal management and animal welfare

    Contributor(s):: Lewton, Jack, Rose, Paul E.

    Social network analysis (SNA) is useful for evaluating management zoo regimes to ensure that any fitness benefits of sociality are preserved in captive-housed groups. This paper explores the association patterns of 13 giraffes housed at Longleat Safari Park, UK. Wild giraffes exhibit a...

  12. Do hens have friends?

    Contributor(s):: Abeyesinghe, Siobhan M., Drewe, Julian A., Asher, Lucy, Wathes, Christopher M., Collins, Lisa M.

    Recent interest in positive welfare has encouraged consideration of the formation of socio-positive relationships in farmed species which may provide a means by which to manage positive states. We investigated in detail the existence of dyadic preferential associations in small groups of domestic...

  13. How can social network analysis contribute to social behavior research in applied ethology?

    Contributor(s):: Makagon, Maja M., McCowan, Brenda, Mench, Joy A.

    Social network analysis is increasingly used by behavioral ecologists and primatologists to describe the patterns and quality of interactions among individuals. We provide an overview of this methodology, with examples illustrating how it can be used to study social behavior in applied contexts....

  14. 'He's my mate you see': a critical discourse analysis of the therapeutic role of companion animals in the social networks of people with a diagnosis of severe mental illness

    Contributor(s):: Brooks, H., Rushton, K., Lovell, K., McNaughton, R., Rogers, A.

  15. Foraging Performance, Prosociality, and Kin Presence Do Not Predict Lifetime Reproductive Success in Batek Hunter-Gatherers

    Contributor(s):: Kraft, Thomas S., Venkataraman, Vivek V., Tacey, Ivan, Dominy, Nathaniel J., Endicott, Kirk M.

  16. Comprehensive analysis of affiliative and agonistic social networks in lactating dairy cattle groups

    Contributor(s):: Foris, Borbala, Zebunke, Manuela, Langbein, Jan, Melzer, Nina

    The social environment of dairy cattle is important for their welfare under modern housing and management conditions. Social tension can negatively affect individuals even in a well-designed and healthy environment whereas affiliative behaviour may improve their well-being. The complex social...

  17. Social bonds in a flock bird: Species differences and seasonality in social structure in captive flamingo flocks over a 12-month period

    Contributor(s):: Rose, Paul E., Croft, Darren P.

    Social network analysis (SNA) is a popular tool for investigating key components of sociality in free-living populations, and is growing in its application to captive animal systems. For social species held in captivity, welfare may be improved if protocols for care take key aspects of sociality...

  18. Important role of dominance in allogrooming behaviour in beef cattle

    Contributor(s):: Šárová, Radka, Gutmann, Anke Kristina, Špinka, Marek, Stěhulová, Ilona, Winckler, Christoph

    In domestic cattle, the relationship between dominance and allogrooming behaviour has been investigated in several studies. However, the results do not show a consistent pattern. The aim of this study was to investigate this relationship in a stable female beef cattle herd using social network...

  19. Persistence of sociality in group dynamics of dairy cattle

    Contributor(s):: Rocha, Luis E. C., Terenius, Olle, Veissier, Isabelle, Meunier, Bruno, Nielsen, Per P.

    In many species, animals live in highly structured groups. In these groups, individual differences in the number and identity of social contacts (alters) of each ego define the social network structure of the animal group. The composition of groups can be disturbed by grouping animals according...

  20. Temporal development of agonistic interactions as well as dominance indices and centrality parameters in pigs after mixing

    Contributor(s):: Büttner, Kathrin, Czycholl, Irena, Mees, Katharina, Krieter, Joachim

    Previous studies showed that depending on different factors, such as age, level of familiarity or group size, the number of agonistic interactions in pigs directly after mixing can demonstrate a large variation: from groups which reveal a clear decline in agonistic interactions one day after...