You are here: Home / Tags / Social Networks / All Categories

Tags: Social Networks

All Categories (1-20 of 29)

  1. How can social network analysis contribute to social behavior research in applied ethology?

    Contributor(s):: Makagon, Maja M., McCowan, Brenda, Mench, Joy A.

    Social network analysis is increasingly used by behavioral ecologists and primatologists to describe the patterns and quality of interactions among individuals. We provide an overview of this methodology, with examples illustrating how it can be used to study social behavior in applied contexts....

  2. 'He's my mate you see': a critical discourse analysis of the therapeutic role of companion animals in the social networks of people with a diagnosis of severe mental illness

    Contributor(s):: Brooks, H., Rushton, K., Lovell, K., McNaughton, R., Rogers, A.

  3. Foraging Performance, Prosociality, and Kin Presence Do Not Predict Lifetime Reproductive Success in Batek Hunter-Gatherers

    Contributor(s):: Kraft, Thomas S., Venkataraman, Vivek V., Tacey, Ivan, Dominy, Nathaniel J., Endicott, Kirk M.

  4. Comprehensive analysis of affiliative and agonistic social networks in lactating dairy cattle groups

    Contributor(s):: Foris, Borbala, Zebunke, Manuela, Langbein, Jan, Melzer, Nina

    The social environment of dairy cattle is important for their welfare under modern housing and management conditions. Social tension can negatively affect individuals even in a well-designed and healthy environment whereas affiliative behaviour may improve their well-being. The complex social...

  5. Persistence of sociality in group dynamics of dairy cattle

    Contributor(s):: Rocha, Luis E. C., Terenius, Olle, Veissier, Isabelle, Meunier, Bruno, Nielsen, Per P.

    In many species, animals live in highly structured groups. In these groups, individual differences in the number and identity of social contacts (alters) of each ego define the social network structure of the animal group. The composition of groups can be disturbed by grouping animals according...

  6. Leadership linked to group composition in Highland cattle (Bos taurus): Implications for livestock management

    Contributor(s):: Sueur, Cédric, Kuntz, Cédric, Debergue, Elise, Keller, Blandine, Robic, Florian, Siegwalt-Baudin, Flora, Richer, Camille, Ramos, Amandine, Pelé, Marie

    Animals kept for livestock or conservation form strong cohesive groups when foraging and moving, in the same way as their wild counterparts. Collective decision-making involves making compromises by consensus to maintain group cohesion and synchronisation. This type of consensus can be observed...

  7. Can mental health interventions change social networks? A systematic review

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Kimberly Anderson, Neelam Laxhman, Stefan Priebe

    Background Social networks of patients with psychosis can provide social support, and improve health and social outcomes, including quality of life. However, patients with psychosis often live rather isolated with very limited social networks. Evidence for interventions targeting symptoms or...

  8. The role of service dog training in the treatment of combat-related PTSD

    | Contributor(s):: Yount, Rick, Cameron Ritchie, Elspeth, St. Laurent, Matthew, Chumley, Perry, Olmert, Meg Daley

  9. Predicting the attachment bonds between people and their pets

    | Contributor(s):: Yeagley, Christina B.

  10. Neural mechanisms underlying human-animal interaction: An evolutionary perspective

    | Contributor(s):: Carter, C. Sue, Porges, Stephen W., Freund, Lisa S., McCune, Sandra, Esposito, Layla, Gee, Nancy R., McCardle, Peggy

  11. Ontological security and connectivity provided by pets: A study in the self-management of the everyday lives of people diagnosed with a long-term mental health condition

    | Contributor(s):: Brooks, Helen, Rushton, Kelly, Walker, Sandra, Lovell, Karina, Rogers, Anne

  12. The social network structure of a dynamic group of dairy cows: from individual to group level patterns

    | Contributor(s):: Boyland, Natasha K., Mlynski, David T., James, Richard, Brent, Lauren J. N., Croft, Darren P.

    Social relationships have been shown to significantly impact individual and group success in wild animal populations, but are largely ignored in farm animal management. There are substantial gaps in our knowledge of how farm animals respond to their social environment, which varies greatly...

  13. The More People I Meet, the More I like My Dog: A Study of Pet-Oriented Social Networks on the Web

    | Contributor(s):: Golbeck, Jennifer

  14. The Internet and Pets: Jennifer Golbeck at TEDxGeorgetown

    Dr. Jennifer Golbeck, Professor of Information Studies, U.M.D. | Jennifer Golbeck is an Assistant Professor in the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park and co-director of the Human-Computer Interaction Lab. She studies social networks, recommender systems,...

  15. Can an online social network get Fido and his owner off the couch?

  16. Granny and the robots: ethical issues in robot care for the elderly

    | Contributor(s):: Sharkey, A., Sharkey, N.

  17. On the Fence: Dog Parks in the (Un)Leashing of Community and Social Capital

    | Contributor(s):: Graham, Taryn M., Glover, Troy D.

  18. The Pet Factor - Companion Animals as a Conduit for Getting to Know People, Friendship Formation and Social Support

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Lisa Wood, Karen Martin, Hayley Christian, Andrea Nathan, Claire Lauritsen, Steve Houghton, Ichiro Kawachi, Sandra McCune

    Background While companion animals have been previously identified as a direct source of companionship and support to their owners, their role as a catalyst for friendship formation or social support networks among humans has received little attention. This study investigated the indirect...

  19. Mental Health Problems, Recovery, and the Impact of Green Care Services: A Qualitative, Participant-Focused Approach

    | Contributor(s):: Granerud, Arild, Eriksson, Bengt G.

  20. Editorial... [corrected] [published erratum appears in J SOC WORK PRACT 2011 Sep; 25(3):381]

    | Contributor(s):: Briggs, Stephen, Froggett, Lynn, Smith, Martin

    An introduction is presented in which the editor discusses various reports within the issue on topics including negative capability, self-esteem, and the potential therapeutic use of experiences with horses among young people.