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  1. Impact of publicly sponsored neutering programs on animal population dynamics at animal shelters: the New Hampshire and Austin experiences

    Contributor(s):: White, S. C., Jefferson, E., Levy, J. K.

    This study found that government-funded surgical sterilization of companion animals has been widely promoted as a means of decreasing shelter intake and euthanasia. However, little information is available about the true impact of these programs on community and shelter nonhuman animal population...

  2. Self-harm in laboratory-housed primates: where is the evidence that the Animal Welfare Act amendment has worked?

    Contributor(s):: Balcombe, J., Ferdowsian, H., Durham, D.

    The 1985 amendment to the United States Animal Welfare Act (AWA) to promote psychological well being of primates in the laboratory represents an acknowledgment of an important welfare problem concerning nonhuman animals. How effective has this amendment been? Perhaps the best-known contributor to...

  3. Simple cannulation procedure for serial blood sampling through cutaneous ulnar vein in chickens

    Contributor(s):: Bayer, D. M., Mohan, K., Jayakumar, K., Manafi, M., Pavithra, B. H.

    The objective of the study was to collect repeated, low-stress blood samples from the ulnar vein of chickens required for pharmacokinetic studies or hormonal assays. The study used 5 apparently healthy, unsexed, commercial broiler chickens about 6 weeks old and weighing 1.7-1.9 kg for serial...

  4. Assessing acute effects of trapping, handling, and tagging on the behavior of wildlife using GPS telemetry: a case study of the common brushtail possum

    Contributor(s):: Dennis, T. E., Shah, S. F.

    Trapping, handling, and deployment of tracking devices (tagging) are essential aspects of many research and conservation studies of wildlife. However, often these activities place nonhuman animals under considerable physical or psychological distress, which disrupts normal patterns of behavior...

  5. The Problem of Anthropomorphous Animals: Toward a Posthumanist Ethics

    Contributor(s):: Varsava, N.

  6. The political economy of land grabs in Malawi: investigating the contribution of limphasa sugar corporation to rural development

    Contributor(s):: Chinsinga, B., Chasukwa, M., Zuka, S. P.

    Though a recent phenomenon, land grabs have generated considerable debate that remains highly polarized. In this debate, one view presents land deals as a path to sustainable and transformative rural development through capital accumulation, infrastructural development, technology transfer, and...

  7. Does Pet Ownership in Infancy Lead to Asthma or Allergy at School Age? Pooled Analysis of Individual Participant Data from 11 European Birth Cohorts

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: K. Lødrup Carlsen, S. Roll, K.H. Carlsen, P. Mowinchel, A. Wijga, B. Brunekreef, M. Torrent, G. Roberts, S.H. Arshad, I. Kull, U. Krämer, A. von Berg, E. Eller, A. Høst, C. Kuehni, B. Spycher, J. Sunyer, C. Chen, A. Reich, A. Asarnoj, C. Puig, O. Herbarth, J. Mahachie John, K. Van Steen, S. Willich, U. Wahn, S. Lau, T. Keil

    Objective To examine the associations between pet keeping in early childhood and asthma and allergies in children aged 6–10 years. Design Pooled analysis of individual participant data of 11 prospective European birth cohorts that recruited a total of over 22,000 children in the...

  8. Human Analogue Safe Haven Effect of the Owner: Behavioural and Heart Rate Response to Stressful Social Stimuli in Dogs

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: M. Gácsi, K. Maros, S. Sernkvist, T. Faragó, A. Miklósi

    The secure base and safe haven effects of the attachment figure are central features of the human attachment theory. Recently, conclusive evidence for human analogue attachment behaviours in dogs has been provided, however, the owner’s security-providing role in danger has not been directly...

  9. Living with Cat and Dog Increases Vaginal Colonization with E. coli in pregnant Women

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: J. Stockholm, S. Schojørring, L. Pedersen, A.L. Bischoff, N. Følsgaard, C.G. Carson, B. Chawes, K. Bønnelykke, A. Mølgaard, K.A. Krogfelt, H. Bisgaard

    BackgroundFurred pets in the household are known reservoirs for pathogenic bacteria, but it is not known if transmission of bacteria between pet and owner leads to significantly increased rate of infections. We studied whether cats and dogs living in the household of pregnant women affect the...

  10. Reverse Zoonotic Disease Transmission (Zooanthroponosis): A Systematic Review of Seldom-Documented Human Biological Threats to Animals

    | Contributor(s):: Ali M. Messenger, Amber N. Barnes, Gregory C. Gray

    Background Research regarding zoonotic diseases often focuses on infectious diseases animals have given to humans. However, an increasing number of reports indicate that humans are transmitting pathogens to animals. Recent examples include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus,...

  11. The Characteristics of Wild Rat (Rattus spp.) Populations from an Inner-City Neighborhood with a Focus on Factors Critical to the Understanding of Rat-Associated Zoonoses

    | Contributor(s):: Chelsea G. Himsworth, Claire M. Jardine, Kirbee L. Parsons, Alice Y.T. Feng, David M. Patrick

    Norway and black rats (Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus) are among the most ubiquitous urban wildlife species and are the source of a number of zoonotic diseases responsible for significant human morbidity and mortality in cities around the world. Rodent ecology is a primary determinant of the...

  12. Microsporidia Detection and Genotyping Study of Human Pathogenic E. bieneusi in Animals from Spain

    | Contributor(s):: Ana Luz Galván-Díaz, Angela Magnet, Soledad Fenoy, Nuno Henriques-Gil, María Haro, Francisco Ponce Gordo, Guadalupe Miró, Carmen del Aguila, Fernando Izquierdo

    Microsporidia are ubiquitous parasites infecting all animal phyla and we present evidence that supports their zoonotic potential. Fecal samples taken from domestic (cats and dogs), farm (pigs, rabbits and ostriches) and wild animals (foxes) from different provinces of Spain were evaluated for...

  13. The Burden of Parasitic Zoonoses in Nepal: A Systematic Review

    | Contributor(s):: B. Devleesschauwer, A. Ale, P. Torgerson, N. Praet, C. Mairtens de Noordhout, B.D. Pandey, S.B. Pun, R. Lake, J. Vercruysse, D.D. Joshi, A.H. Havelaar, L. Duchateau, P. Dorny, N. Speybroek

    BackgroundParasitic zoonoses (PZs) pose a significant but often neglected threat to public health, especially in developing countries. In order to obtain a better understanding of their health impact, summary measures of population health may be calculated, such as the Disability-Adjusted Life...

  14. Terapia mediada por animais e saúde mental: um programa no Centro de Atenção Psicossocial da Infância e Adolescência em Porto Alegre - TAA Parte III

    | Contributor(s):: C.B. Franco, A. Pizzinato, M.C. Moreira, M.L.S. Zavaschi, T. Santos, V.L.S. de Oliveira, F.L. Boschetti, L. De M. Menti

    Portuguese:O objetivo deste estudo foi examinar as repercussões de um programa de terapia mediada por animais junto a um grupo de pacientes do Centro de Atenção Psicossocial da Infância e Adolescência do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre-RS. Teve como objeto de estu- do as repercussões...

  15. Hoarding of Animals: An Under-Recognized Public Health Problem in a Difficult-to-Study Population

    | Contributor(s):: Gary J. Patronek

    The objective of this study was to better characterize the problem of hoarding, or pathological collecting, of animals. Methods. The author summarized data from a convenience sample of 54 case reports from 0 animal control agencies and humane societies across the country. The majority (76%) of...

  16. An epidemiologic study of the human bite

    | Contributor(s):: John S Marr, Alan M. Beck, Joseph A. Lugo Jr.

    HUMAN BITES ARE A SERIOUS MEDICAL and surgical problem. A wide range of secondary consequenceshave been documented in the medical literature, including deformity, amputation, infection, transmissionof disease agents, and psychosexual aberrations. Recognition of the human bite as part of the...

  17. Animal companions and one-year survival of patients after discharge from a coronary care unit

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Erika Friedmann, Aaron Honori Katcher, James Lynch, Sue Ann Thomas

    This study looked at the effects of social isolation and social support on the survival of patients whowere hospitalized in a CCU with a diagnosis of MI or angina pectoris (AP). Social factors have been reportedto account for some of the variation in the incidence of MI and AP (25,28), but...

  18. Attacks by Packs of Dogs Involving Predation on Human Beings

    | Contributor(s):: Peter L. Borchelt, Randall Lockwood, Alan M. Beck, Victoria L. Voith

    Dog bites are a medical problem for millions of people, children being the most common victims.Human deaths attributable to dog bite injury (not rabies) are relatively infrequent. There have beensome epidemiologic reviews, but this study is the first attempt to arrive at an understanding of...

  19. Medical costs and other aspects of dog bites in Baltimore

    | Contributor(s):: David R. Berzon, John B. DeHoff

    INJURIES CAUSED BY DOG BITES havegrown to epidemic proportions in recent yearsand are now of major public health significance.Animal bites may lead to dangerous viral andbacterial infections, such as rabies, pasteurellosis,and tetanus, and the injuries may result in permanentscars, severe...

  20. Prevalence and risk factors of feline leukaemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus in peninsular Malaysia

    | Contributor(s):: F. Bande, S. Arshad, L. Hassan, Z. Zakaria, N. Sapian, N. Rahman, A. Alazway

    BackgroundFeline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are major causes of morbidity and mortality in domestic and wild felids. Despite the clinical importance of feline retroviruses and the growing interest in cats as pets, information about FeLV and FIV in Malaysia is...