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  1. Tail-biting behaviour pre-weaning: Association between other pig-directed and general behaviour in piglets

    Contributor(s):: Hakansson, F., Bolhuis, J. E.

  2. Prevalence and severity of tail lesions as a possible welfare indicator for rabbit does

    Contributor(s):: Bill, J., Rauterberg, S. L., Stracke, J., Kemper, N., Fels, M.

  3. Post-natal development of EEG responses to noxious stimulation in pigs (Sus scrofa) aged 1-15 days

    Contributor(s):: Kells, N. J., Beausoleil, N. J., Satherland, M. A., Johnson, C. B.

  4. Long-term hyperalgesia and traumatic neuroma formation in tail-docked lambs

    Contributor(s):: Larrondo, C., Bustamante, H., Paredes, E., Gallo, C.

  5. Use of meloxicam, buprenorphine, and Maxilene (R) to assess a multimodal approach for piglet pain management, part 2: tail-docking

    Contributor(s):: Viscardi, A. V., Turner, P. V.

  6. Understanding the multiple conceptions of animal welfare

    Contributor(s):: Weary, D. M., Robbins, J. A.

  7. Goat kids are not small calves: Species comparisons in relation to disbudding

    Contributor(s):: Hempstead, M. N., Waas, J. R., Stewart, M., Sutherland, M. A.

  8. Standardising the assessment of environmental enrichment and tail-docking legal requirements for finishing pigs in Europe

    Contributor(s):: Hothersall, B., Whistance, L., Zedlacher, H., Algers, B., Andersson, E., Bracke, M., Courboulay, V., Ferrari, P., Leeb, C., Mullan, S., Nowicki, J., Meunier-Salaun, M. C., Schwarz, T., Stadig, L., Main, D.

  9. Behavioural differences between weaner pigs with intact and docked tails

    Contributor(s):: Paoli, M. A., Lahrmann, H. P., Jensen, T., D'Eath, R. B.

  10. Case control study on environmental, nutritional and management-based risk factors for tail-biting in long-tailed pigs

    Contributor(s):: Kallio, P. A., Janczak, A. M., Valros, A. E., Edwards, S. A., Heinonen, M.

  11. Electroencephalographic responses of anaesthetised pigs to intraperitoneal injection of sodium pentobarbital

    Contributor(s):: Kells, N. J., Beausoleil, N. J., Sutherland, M. A., Johnson, C. B.

  12. Tail-directed behaviour in pigs – relation to tail posture and tail lesion

    Contributor(s):: Wilder, Thore, Krieter, Joachim, Kemper, Nicole, Honeck, Anja, Büttner, Kathrin

    Tail-biting in pigs affects the health and welfare of the animals. Different indicators, such as the tail posture, can be used to detect tail-biting at an early stage. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of tail-directed behaviour, differentiating between tail-biting and...

  13. Tail postures and tail motion in pigs: A review

    Contributor(s):: Camerlink, Irene, Ursinus, Winanda W.

    Animals’ tail posture and motion play an important role in communication, amongst others. In domestic pigs, the debate around tail docking and tail biting has made the tail an important research topic, and tail-related behaviour is increasingly proposed as a welfare indicator. While the focus is...

  14. Tail biting behaviour and tail damage in pigs and the relationship with general behaviour: Predicting the inevitable?

    Contributor(s):: Ursinus, Winanda W., Van Reenen, Cornelis G., Kemp, Bas, Bolhuis, J. Elizabeth

    Tail biting behaviour in pigs is a common problem in conventional housing systems. Our study examined the consistency over time in tail biting and tail damage and it explored the predictive value of general behaviours observed in individual pigs and in pens as a whole. Pigs (n=480), reared in...

  15. The pig's nose and its role in dominance relationships and harmful behaviour

    Contributor(s):: Camerlink, I., Turner, S. P.

    Affiliative behaviour may have an essential role in many behavioural processes. Gently nosing between group members occurs in almost all social behavioural processes of pigs (Sus scrofa), but the reasons for its performance are unclear. We examined whether nosing between pigs was related to...

  16. Chewable materials before weaning reduce tail biting in growing pigs

    Contributor(s):: Telkänranta, Helena, Swan, Kirsi, Hirvonen, Heikki, Valros, Anna

    Tail biting in pigs is a multi-factorial problem, and the early rearing environment has been proposed as a potential previously unidentified factor. The aim of this study was to test whether access to chewable material from birth to weaning reduces later tail biting. Undocked litters of 59 sows...

  17. Tail biting in fattening pigs: Associations between frequency of tail biting and other abnormal behaviours

    Contributor(s):: Brunberg, Emma, Wallenbeck, Anna, Keeling, Linda J.

    This study investigated the association between tail biting (TB) and other abnormal behaviours in a group of non-tail docked pigs. Behavioural data were collected from 742 pigs housed on a commercial farm. The prevalence of performed and received TB, belly nosing, bar biting, ear biting and...

  18. Relationship between growth rate and oral manipulation, social nosing, and aggression in finishing pigs

    Contributor(s):: Camerlink, Irene, Bijma, Piter, Kemp, Bas, Bolhuis, J. Elizabeth

    Pigs may affect each other's health, welfare and productivity through their behaviour. The effect of a pig on the growth rate of its pen mates is partly heritable and is referred to as its social genetic effect. Social genetic effects, also known as indirect genetic effects, have been found in a...

  19. A longitudinal study of the effects of providing straw at different stages of life on tail-biting and other behaviour in commercially housed pigs

    Contributor(s):: Statham, Poppy, Green, Laura, Mendl, Michael

    Tail-biting (TB) is a welfare concern. Recent studies indicate that early provision of straw may help prevent TB, however, many of these studies were carried out on small groups of pigs and may have limited applicability to commercial farms. The effect of providing straw at different stages of...

  20. The long and short of it: A review of tail docking in farm animals

    Contributor(s):: Sutherland, Mhairi A., Tucker, Cassandra B.

    Tail docking involves amputating a portion of the tail for a variety of reasons. We review the scientific evidence for the rationale for tail docking, a description of the different methods used, the pain response to the procedure and the effectiveness of pain alleviation, and, finally, the...