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Tags: Tourism and travel + Mammals

Resources (1-20 of 41)

  1. In the water with white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias): participants' beliefs toward cage-diving in Australia

    Contributor(s):: Apps, K., Dimmock, K., Lloyd, D., Huveneers, C.

    White shark (Carcharodon carcharias) cage-diving tourism is a controversial activity that provokes emotional and often opposing points of view. With increasing demand for shark tourism since the 1990s, the underlying determinants driving this growth in participation remain unclear. This paper...

  2. In the water with white sharks ( Carcharodon carcharias): participants' beliefs toward cage-diving in Australia

    Contributor(s):: Apps, K., Dimmock, K., Lloyd, D., Huveneers, C.

    White shark ( Carcharodon carcharias) cage-diving tourism is a controversial activity that provokes emotional and often opposing points of view. With increasing demand for shark tourism since the 1990s, the underlying determinants driving this growth in participation remain unclear. This paper...

  3. A welfare assessment scoring system for working equids - a method for identifying at risk populations and for monitoring progress of welfare enhancement strategies (trialed in Egypt)

    Contributor(s):: Ali, A. B. A., El-Sayed, M. A., Matoock, M. Y., Fouad, M. A., Heleski, C. R.

    There are an estimated 112 million horses, donkeys and mules (i.e., working equids) in developing regions of the world. Though their roles are often fundamental to the well-being of the families they work for, their welfare is often severely compromised due to the limited resources and/or limited...

  4. Tourists' perceptions of the free-roaming dog population in Samoa

    Contributor(s):: Beckman, M., Hill, K. E., Farnworth, M. J., Bolwell, C. F., Bridges, J., Acke, E.

    A study was undertaken to establish how visiting tourists to Samoa perceived free-roaming dogs ( Canis familiaris) and their management, additionally some factors that influence their perceptions were assessed. Questionnaires were administered to 281 tourists across Samoa over 5 weeks....

  5. Piglets call for maternal attention: vocal behaviour in Sus scrofa domesticus is modulated by mother's proximity

    Contributor(s):: Iacobucci, P., Colonnello, V., D'Antuono, L., Cloutier, S., Newberry, R. C.

    Plasticity in the production of "separation distress" vocalizations, and seeking of caregivers beyond mere satisfaction of immediate physiological needs, are manifestations of attachment that we investigated in the domestic pig ( Sus scrofa domesticus). Female piglets from eight litters were...

  6. Hunting restraint by Creoles at the Community Baboon Sanctuary, Belize: a preliminary survey

    Contributor(s):: Jones, C. B., Young, J.

    This study surveyed 33 male hunters between the ages of 17 and 54 years at the Community Baboon Sanctuary (CBS), Belize, to evaluate attitudes and behaviours in relation to hunting black howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra). The study defined hunting restraint as a learned predisposition not to hunt 1...

  7. Human-dog interactions and behavioural responses of village dogs in coastal villages in Michoacan, Mexico

    Contributor(s):: Ruiz-Izaguirre, E., Eilers, K. H. A. M., Bokkers, E. A. M., Ortolani, A., Ortega-Pacheco, A., Boer, I. J. M. de

    In Mexican villages, most households keep dogs that roam freely. Therefore, socialisation of village dogs occurs in a different context than that of companion dogs in developed countries. The objectives of this study were: (1) to assess village dogs' behavioural responses towards familiar and...

  8. What good is a bear to society?

    Contributor(s):: Harding, L.

    Arising out of fieldwork in the Canadian Rockies, this paper analyzes the role of bears in the conservation culture of Canadian national parks. Why is the presence of this large predator tolerated and even celebrated by some? And why do others fear and even despise this animal, whom they see as a...

  9. A comparison of body size, coat condition and endoparasite diversity of wild Barbary macaques exposed to different levels of tourism

    Contributor(s):: Borg, C., Majolo, B., Qarro, M., Semple, S.

    Primate tourism is a rapidly growing industry with the potential to provide considerable conservation benefits. However, assessing the impact of tourists on the animals involved is vital to ensure that the conservation value of primate tourism is maximized. In this study, we compared body size,...

  10. Tourism and infant-directed aggression in Tibetan macaques ( Macaca thibetana) at Mt. Huangshan, China

    Contributor(s):: Self, S., Sheeran, L. K., Matheson, M. D., Li, JinHua, Pelton, O., Harding, S., Wagner, R. S.

  11. Choosing between the emotional dog and the rational pal: a moral dilemma with a tail

    Contributor(s):: Topolski, R., Weaver, J. N., Martin, Z., McCoy, J.

  12. Infectious diseases associated with relation between humans and wildlife - consideration on wild bird mortality and bird-feeding

    Contributor(s):: Fukui, D.

  13. "Buddhist compassion" and "animal abuse" in Thailand's Tiger Temple

    Contributor(s):: Cohen, E.

  14. Exploring opportunities to do things differently

    Contributor(s):: Gibbens, N.

  15. Pet travel changes - good for owners... but what about pets?

    Contributor(s):: Cooper, E.

  16. Perceptions of village dogs by villagers and tourists in the coastal region of rural Oaxaca, Mexico

    Contributor(s):: Ruiz-Izaguirre, E., Eilers, C. H. A. M.

  17. When wildlife tourism goes wrong: a case study of stakeholder and management issues regarding Dingoes on Fraser Island, Australia

    Contributor(s):: Burns, G. L., Howard, P.

    Images on brochures, web pages and postcards lead to an expectation by tourists and visitors that interaction with Dingoes (Canis lupus Dingo) will be part of their Fraser Island experience in Australia. However, as the number of tourists to the island increase, so do the reports of Dingo...

  18. Behavioural responses of South American fur seals to approach by tourists - a brief report

    Contributor(s):: Cassini, M. H.

    I studied the responses (retreats, threats, attacks or leaving the rookery) of South American fur seals Arctocephalus australis to tourist approaches at a non-reproductive, continental colony of located in Cabo Polonio, Uruguay (34 degrees 24'S, 53 degrees 46'W). Fur seals tolerated relatively...

  19. Interactions between visitors and Formosan macaques ( Macaca cyclopis ) at Shou-Shan Nature Park, Taiwan

    Contributor(s):: Hsu, M. J., Kao, ChienChing, Agoramoorthy, G.

    Ecotourism involving feeding wildlife has raised public attention and is a controversial issue, especially concerning nonhuman primates. Between July 2002 and April 2005, the behavior of monkeys and tourists was collected through scan samplings, focal samplings and behavior samplings at the...

  20. The reintroduction and reinterpretation of the wild

    Contributor(s):: O'Rourke, E.

    This paper is concerned with changing social representations of the "wild," in particular wild animals. It argues that within a contemporary Western context the old agricultural perception of wild animals as adversarial and as a threat to domestication, is being replaced by an essentially urban...