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Resources (1-20 of 50)

  1. "Buddhist compassion" and "animal abuse" in Thailand's Tiger Temple

    Contributor(s):: Cohen, E.

  2. A comparison of body size, coat condition and endoparasite diversity of wild Barbary macaques exposed to different levels of tourism

    Contributor(s):: Borg, C., Majolo, B., Qarro, M., Semple, S.

    Primate tourism is a rapidly growing industry with the potential to provide considerable conservation benefits. However, assessing the impact of tourists on the animals involved is vital to ensure that the conservation value of primate tourism is maximized. In this study, we compared body size,...

  3. A Lesson in Humility: Traveling with Beau

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Donald F. Smith

    In Part 4 in a series of stories reflecting on a 2007 trip to Alaska with his dog, Beau, the drive across North Dakota was their worst day when Beau became ill. It proved to be the turning point in the experience of traveling with a dog and offered a dose of humility and common sense not...

  4. A welfare assessment scoring system for working equids—A method for identifying at risk populations and for monitoring progress of welfare enhancement strategies (trialed in Egypt)

    | Contributor(s):: Ali, Ahmed B. A., El Sayed, Mohammed A., Matoock, Mohamed Y., Fouad, Manal A., Heleski, Camie R.

    There are an estimated 112 million horses, donkeys and mules (i.e., working equids) in developing regions of the world. Though their roles are often fundamental to the well-being of the families they work for, their welfare is often severely compromised due to the limited resources and/or...

  5. Animal viewing in postmodern America : a case study of the Yellowstone wolf watchers

    | Contributor(s):: Jo Anne Young

    The purpose of this thesis is to examine the American relationship with wildlife by way of a case study of the Yellowstone wolf watchers. The American relationship with nature and animals changed at a never before seen rate during the modern era because of capitalism and industrialization. Our...

  6. Behavioural responses of South American fur seals to approach by tourists - a brief report

    | Contributor(s):: Cassini, M. H.

    I studied the responses (retreats, threats, attacks or leaving the rookery) of South American fur seals Arctocephalus australis to tourist approaches at a non-reproductive, continental colony of located in Cabo Polonio, Uruguay (34 degrees 24'S, 53 degrees 46'W). Fur seals tolerated relatively...

  7. Boat preference and stress behaviour of Hector's dolphin in response to tour boat interactions

    | Contributor(s):: Georgia-Rose Travis

    Dolphins are increasingly coming into contact with humans, particularly where tourism is involved. It has been assumed that such contact causes chronic stress on dolphin populations. This study examined relatively naive populations of Hector's dolphins and their interaction with various...

  8. Choosing between the emotional dog and the rational pal: a moral dilemma with a tail

    | Contributor(s):: Topolski, R., Weaver, J. N., Martin, Z., McCoy, J.

  9. Conservation, Captivity, and Whaling: A Survey of Belize Whalewatching Tourists' Attitudes to Cetacean Conservation Issues

    | Contributor(s):: Katheryn W. Patterson

    With whalewatching activities and associated expenditures increasing annually,  governments in coastal countries possess a large vested interest in the continued growth  and protection of whale populations and the associated tourism. In 2007 and 2008, a  survey investigating...

  10. Dusky dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obscurus) behavior and human interactions: implications for tourism and aquaculture

    | Contributor(s):: Nicholas Matthew Thomson Duprey

    Interactions between humans and dusky dolphins in the coastal waters of New Zealand are increasing. My research focused on tourism interactions, with Kaikoura as the study site; and, on habitat use in an active aquaculture area, with Admiralty Bay as the study site. In Kaikoura, companies engaged...

  11. Equestrians and How They Disperse along Plog's Allocentric/Psychocentric Continuum

    | Contributor(s):: Ricky Hardy

    This is a study of Stanley Plog’s traveler typology and its application to adults engaged in equestrian activities (various styles or classes of riding). The study is based on data acquired by the intercept surveying of adult equestrian riders in North Carolina and Virginia....

  12. Exploring opportunities to do things differently

    | Contributor(s):: Gibbens, N.

  13. Feeding Ecology of Wild Brown-Nosed Coatis and Garbage Exploration: A Study in Two Ecological Parks

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Rodrigues, D. H., Calixto, E., Cesario, C. S., Repoles, R. B., de Paula Lopes, W., Oliveira, V. S., Brinati, A., Hemetrio, N. S., Silva, I. O., Boere, V.

    Wild animals that feed on garbage waste are a problem in ecological parks as it can substantially alter their food ecology. Wild coatis that occupy human recreation areas in parks are often observed feeding on garbage, but the ecological consequences are scarcely known. Forty-four fecal samples...

  14. How does the Tourism Industry of Sri Lanka Encourage the Elephant Commercialization?

    | Contributor(s):: Indrachapa Gunasekara

    Tourism is an industry where everything could be converted into a profit. There are numerous concepts and attractions which introduced ultimately, to meet various types of travel expectations. People travel for many intentions and stick to their interested areas. Culture, nature, humans,...

  15. Human and Wildlife Conflicts

    | Contributor(s):: Larry Clark

    The National Wildlife Research Center (NWRC) is the research arm of the USDA's Wildlife Services program. The NWRC is charged with developing methods to resolve conflicts between humans and wildlife, spanning the areas of agriculture and natural resource protection, invasive species, wildlife...

  16. Human-dog interactions and behavioural responses of village dogs in coastal villages in Michoacan, Mexico

    | Contributor(s):: Ruiz-Izaguirre, E., Eilers, K. H. A. M., Bokkers, E. A. M., Ortolani, A., Ortega-Pacheco, A., Boer, I. J. M. de

    In Mexican villages, most households keep dogs that roam freely. Therefore, socialisation of village dogs occurs in a different context than that of companion dogs in developed countries. The objectives of this study were: (1) to assess village dogs' behavioural responses towards familiar and...

  17. Hunting restraint by Creoles at the Community Baboon Sanctuary, Belize: a preliminary survey

    | Contributor(s):: Jones, C. B., Young, J.

    This study surveyed 33 male hunters between the ages of 17 and 54 years at the Community Baboon Sanctuary (CBS), Belize, to evaluate attitudes and behaviours in relation to hunting black howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra). The study defined hunting restraint as a learned predisposition not to hunt 1...

  18. In the water with white sharks ( Carcharodon carcharias): participants' beliefs toward cage-diving in Australia

    | Contributor(s):: Apps, K., Dimmock, K., Lloyd, D., Huveneers, C.

    White shark ( Carcharodon carcharias) cage-diving tourism is a controversial activity that provokes emotional and often opposing points of view. With increasing demand for shark tourism since the 1990s, the underlying determinants driving this growth in participation remain unclear. This paper...

  19. In the water with white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias): participants' beliefs toward cage-diving in Australia

    | Contributor(s):: Apps, K., Dimmock, K., Lloyd, D., Huveneers, C.

    White shark (Carcharodon carcharias) cage-diving tourism is a controversial activity that provokes emotional and often opposing points of view. With increasing demand for shark tourism since the 1990s, the un- derlying determinants driving this growth in participation remain unclear. This paper...

  20. Infectious diseases associated with relation between humans and wildlife - consideration on wild bird mortality and bird-feeding

    | Contributor(s):: Fukui, D.