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  1. Social transmission of physiological and behavioural responses to castration in suckling Merino lambs

    | Contributor(s):: Colditz, I. G., Paull, D. R., Lee, C.

    In social species like sheep, social context can modify both physiological and behavioural responses to stressors and normal behavioural patterns. Presence of conspecifics can ameliorate responses to noxious stimuli, an effect termed social buffering, whereas the presence of a distressed...

  2. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in resident animals of a long-term care facility

    | Contributor(s):: Coughlan, K., Olsen, K. E., Boxrud, D., Bender, J. B.

    Animals provide benefits to elderly and chronically ill people by decreasing loneliness, increasing social interactions, and improving mental health. As a result, many hospitals and long-term care facilities allow family pets to visit ill or convalescing patients or support animal-assisted...

  3. All a mother's fault? Transmission of stereotypy in striped mice Rhabdomys

    | Contributor(s):: Jones, M., Lierop, M. van, Pillay, N.

    Environmentally induced stereotypy is the most common abnormal behaviour in captive animals. However, not all animals housed in identically impoverished environments develop stereotypy, possibly because of differences in genetic predisposition. To investigate the transmission of stereotypy in...

  4. Behaviour of badgers ( Meles meles ) in farm buildings: opportunities for the transmission of Mycobacterium bovis to cattle?

    | Contributor(s):: Tolhurst, B. A., Delahay, R. J., Walker, N. J., Ward, A. I., Roper, T. J.

    Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) are implicated in the transmission of bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) to cattle. Here we investigate potential spatio-temporal foci of opportunities for contact between badgers and cattle in farm buildings. We discuss the relative occurrence of different...

  5. Social discrimination of familiar conspecifics by juvenile pigs, Sus scrofa : development of a non-invasive method to study the transmission of unimodal and bimodal cues between live stimuli

    | Contributor(s):: McLeman, M. A., Mendl, M. T., Jones, R. B., Wathes, C. M.

    A non-invasive method was developed to study the transmission of cues that are used in social discrimination by pigs, Sus scrofa. We investigated the ability of juvenile pigs to discriminate between pairs of familiar, similar-aged conspecifics in a Y-maze learning task, using either single or...

  6. Zoonotic disease concerns in animal-assisted therapy and animal visitation programs

    | Contributor(s):: David Waltner-Toews

    A survey was done of 150 systematically selected United States animal care agencies and 74 Canadian humane societies to determine the prevalence of animal assisted therapy (AAT) programs; concerns about, and experience with, zoonotic diseases; and precautions taken to prevent zoonotic disease...

  7. Wildlife diseases and human health

    | Contributor(s):: Keith A. Clark

    Zoonoses (singular, zoonosis) are diseases transmissible from animals to man. There are over 200 such diseases; many are harbored by wildlife reservoirs. A reservoir may be defined as a source which maintains the presence of a disease in an ecosystem. Wildlife-associated "zoonoses found in Texas...

  8. All creatures great and minute: a public policy primer for companion animal zoonoses

    | Contributor(s):: Reaser, J. K., Clark, E. E., Jr., Meyers, N. M.

    Approximately 63% of US households have at least one pet, a large percentage of which are considered family members. Pet owners can derive substantial physical and psychological benefits from interaction with companion animals. However, pet ownership is not without risks; zoonotic diseases are...

  9. Dog behaviour on walks and the effect of use of the leash

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Westgarth, C., Christley, R. M., Pinchbeck, G. L., Gaskell, R. M., Dawson, S., Bradshaw, J. W. S.

    This paper describes how often pet dogs interact with other dogs, people and the environment, whilst being walked. Such interactions may involve aggression or the transmission of infectious disease. We also assessed the effect of the use of a leash as a modifier of these outcomes. In study one,...

  10. The behavioural responses of badgers ( Meles meles ) to exclusion from farm buildings using an electric fence

    | Contributor(s):: Tolhurst, B. A., Ward, A. I., Delahay, R. J., MacMaster, A. M., Roper, T. J.

    Behavioural investigations into the transmission of bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) between badgers and cattle suggest that badger activity in farm buildings may incur a significant risk of cross-infection. However, measures to exclude badgers from buildings have not been...

  11. The social transmission of information and behaviour

    | Contributor(s):: Nicol, C. J.

  12. Effects of habitat complexity on the aggressive behaviour of the American lobster ( Homarus americanus ) in captivity

    | Contributor(s):: Cenni, F., Parisi, G., Gherardi, F.

    The American lobster, Homarus americanus, is one of the most economically valuable crustacean decapods worldwide, being mostly exploited to foster the live animal industry. Lobsters are typically held in storage facilities where individuals may suffer due to the repeated combats among each other....

  13. The public face of zoos: images of entertainment, education and conservation

    | Contributor(s):: Carr, N., Cohen, S.

    The contemporary justification for zoos is based on their ability to act as sites of wildlife conservation. Alongside this is the reality that zoos have historically been defined as sites for the entertainment of the general public and continue to be dependent on the revenue raised through...

  14. Genotype rather than non-genetic behavioural transmission determines the temperament of Merino lambs

    | Contributor(s):: Bickell, S., Poindron, P., Nowak, R., Chadwick, A., Ferguson, D., Blache, D.

    Merino ewes have been selected, over 18 generations, for calm (C) or nervous (N) temperament using an arena test and an isolation box test. We investigated the relative contributions of genotype versus the post-partum behaviour of the dam on the temperament of the lambs using a cross-fostering...

  15. Sickness behaviour and its relevance to animal welfare assessment at the group level

    | Contributor(s):: Millman, S. T.

    The inflammatory response evokes changes in behaviour including increased thermoregulatory activities and sleep, reduced social exploration and appetite, and altered food preferences. This sickness response also includes feelings of lethargy, depression, and pain, collectively referred to as...

  16. The effect of essential oils showing acaricidal activity against the poultry red mite ( Dermanyssus gallinae ) on aspects of welfare and production of laying hens

    | Contributor(s):: George, Sparagano, O. A. E., Port, G., Okello, E., Shiel, R. S., Guy, J. H.

    The poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae) causes severe welfare concerns for laying hens arising from anaemia and disease transmission, and has been identified as an associated risk factor in cannibalistic feather pecking. Previous work suggests that essential oils may offer an alternative to...

  17. Wild animal conservation and welfare in agricultural systems. (Special Issue: Conservation and animal welfare.)

    | Contributor(s):: Mathews, F.

    At least one-third of the land on earth is used for agricultural production and conflicts with the interests of wildlife are inevitable. These conflicts are likely to escalate as the human population expands and as the scale and intensity of agricultural production increases. This paper argues...

  18. Studies on the phenogenetics of behaviour in dogs

    | Contributor(s):: Krusinskii, L. V.

    THE 3 characters studied are (a) "passive defence reaction, " or shyness, T, as shown by tendency to run away at the approach of a stranger, hiding in a corner, dilation of pupils, muscular tetanus; (b) "active defence reaction " or aggressiveness, A [N.B. author uses no symbol] shown by attempt...