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  1. Underreporting of wildlife-vehicle collisions does not hinder predictive models for large ungulates

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Nathan P. Snow, William F. Porter, David M. Williams

    Conflicts from wildlife–vehicle collisions (WVCs) pose serious challenges for managing and conserving large ungulates throughout the world. However, underreporting of large proportions of WVCs (i.e., two-thirds of WVCs in some cases) creates concern for relying on governmental databases...

  2. The visitor effect in petting zoo-housed animals: Aversive or enriching?

    | Contributor(s):: Farrand, Alexandra, Hosey, Geoff, Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M.

    Two studies were carried out on the effect of visitors on mixed-breed goats, llama, and Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs housed in a petting zoo display within a safari park. In the first study we investigated the effect of the presence and density of visitors on the animals’ behaviour and in the...

  3. Association between taxonomic relatedness and interspecific mortality in captive ungulates

    | Contributor(s):: Hanzlíková, Veronika, Pluháček, Jan, Čulík, Luděk

    Interspecific aggressive interactions are known among a variety of animals including ungulates. Nevertheless, most studies on interspecific interactions in ungulates involve case reports without testing any specific hypotheses. We tested two mutually exclusive hypotheses; that mortality rate in...

  4. Indicators of age, body size and sex in goat kid calls revealed using the source–filter theory

    | Contributor(s):: Briefer, Elodie, McElligott, Alan G.

    The source–filter theory is an important framework recently applied to the study of animal vocalisations, which links the mode of vocal production to call parameters. Vocalisations can be good indicators of a sender's characteristics, such as identity, body size, age, and even hormonal status and...

  5. Leadership linked to group composition in Highland cattle (Bos taurus): Implications for livestock management

    | Contributor(s):: Sueur, Cédric, Kuntz, Cédric, Debergue, Elise, Keller, Blandine, Robic, Florian, Siegwalt-Baudin, Flora, Richer, Camille, Ramos, Amandine, Pelé, Marie

    Animals kept for livestock or conservation form strong cohesive groups when foraging and moving, in the same way as their wild counterparts. Collective decision-making involves making compromises by consensus to maintain group cohesion and synchronisation. This type of consensus can be observed...

  6. The Emergence of Animal Management in the Southern Levant

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Natalie D. Munro, Guy Bar-Oz, Jacqueline S. Meier, Lidar Sapir-Hen, Mary C. Stiner, Reuven Yeshurun

    Our compilation of zooarchaeological data from a series of important archaeological sites spanning the Epipaleolithic through Pre-Pottery Neolithic B periods in the Mediterranean Hills of the southern Levant contributes to major debates about the beginnings of ungulate management in Southwest...

  7. Wild Connection: How Do We Connect With Animals? | Leila Goulet | TEDxRoseburg

    We have all had an experience with an animal at some point in our lives… How have these experiences shaped the way we view and interact with living things? What can we do to be the voice of so many vanishing species? In this talk, personal wildlife conservation stories will be explored,...

  8. Effects of guest feeding programs on captive giraffe behavior

    | Contributor(s):: Orban, D. A., Siegford, J. M., Snider, R. J.

    Zoological institutions develop human-animal interaction opportunities for visitors to advance missions of conservation, education, and recreation; however, the animal welfare implications largely have yet to be evaluated. This behavioral study was the first to quantify impacts of guest feeding...

  9. Management strategies in farrowing house to improve piglet pre-weaning survival and growth

    | Contributor(s):: Vila, R. M., Tummaruk, P.

    Post-partum and lactation are the most complex periods in the swine production chain. Newborn pigs are highly vulnerable due to relatively low body weight at birth and physiological immaturity. Most of the management strategies performed in farrowing houses are oriented to ensure a proper level...

  10. Technology and restructuring the social field of dairy farming: hybrid capitals, 'stockmanship' and Automatic Milking Systems

    | Contributor(s):: Butler, D., Holloway, L.

    Using Automatic Milking Systems (AMS) as an example we use the work of Bourdieu to illustrate how technology can be seen as restructuring dairy farming practices, what it is to be a dairy farmer, and the wider field of dairy farming. Approaching technology in this way and drawing upon the...

  11. Human-animal interaction: productive impact on the dairy herd. CommunicationInteraccion humano-animal: impacto productivo en rodeos lecheros. Comunicacion

    | Contributor(s):: Martinez, G. M., Suarez, V. H., Bertoni, E. A.

  12. Provisioning the ritual neolithic site of Kfar HaHoresh, Israel at the dawn of animal management

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Meier, J. S., Goring-Morris, A. N., Munro, N. D.

    It is widely agreed that a pivotal shift from wild animal hunting to herd animal management, at least of goats, began in the southern Levant by the Middle Pre-Pottery Neolithic B period (10,000-9,500 cal. BP) when evidence of ritual activities flourished in the region. As our knowledge of this...

  13. Positive and negative gestational handling influences placental traits and mother-offspring behavior in dairy goats

    | Contributor(s):: Baxter, E. M., Mulligan, J., Hall, S. A., Donbavand, J. E., Palme, R., Aldujaili, E., Zanella, A. J., Dwyer, C. M.

    Dairy animals are subjected to a number of potential stressors throughout their lives, including daily interactions with humans. The quality of these interactions may have direct consequences for the animal undergoing the experience, but if such events occur during gestation it may also affect...

  14. Application of the welfare quality protocol in pig slaughterhouses of five countries

    | Contributor(s):: Dalmau, A., Nande, A., Vieira-Pinto, M., Zamprogna, S., Martino, G. di, Ribas, J. C. R., Costa, M. P. da, Halinen-Elemo, K., Velarde, A.

    The objective of the present study is to assess the variability of the measures used in the welfare quality (WQ) protocol for pigs among slaughterhouses in five different countries and to propose alarm and critical thresholds for the calculation of scores for future development of an animal...

  15. A prospective exploration of farm, farmer, and animal characteristics in human-animal relationships: an epidemiological survey

    | Contributor(s):: Roches, A. de B. des, Veissier, I., Boivin, X., Gilot-Fromont, E., Mounier, L.

    Human-animal relationships are essential for dairy farming. They affect work comfort and efficiency, as well as milk production. A poor human-animal relationship can result in stress and accidents to both animals and caretakers and needs to be improved. However, many studies have demonstrated the...

  16. Human-animal interactions and safety during dairy cattle handling - comparing moving cows to milking and hoof trimming

    | Contributor(s):: Lindahl, C., Pinzke, S., Herlin, A., Keeling, L. J.

    Cattle handling is a dangerous activity on dairy farms, and cows are a major cause of injuries to livestock handlers. Even if dairy cows are generally tranquil and docile, when situations occur that they perceive or remember as aversive, they may become agitated and hazardous to handle. This...

  17. Face processing of animal and human static stimuli by children with autism spectrum disorder: a pilot study

    | Contributor(s):: Grandgeorge, M., Degrez, C., Alavi, Z., Lemonnier, E.

    Animals are part of humans' social environment and present numerous benefits. Each partner in a human-animal interaction uses signals emitted by the other (e.g. postures, gestures or gaze directions) to collect information to adjust their behaviour. Face processing impairment is associated with...

  18. Runne-Beana: dog herds ethnographer

    | Contributor(s):: Anderson, M.

    Saami society in Lapland (now often called Saapmi), particularly the seasonally-nomadic reindeer-breeding sector, is predicated upon mobility and autonomy of its actors. Runne-Beana, a talented reindeer-herding dog, exhibited both mobility and autonomy when allocating to himself a peripatetic...

  19. Exploring the existence and potential underpinnings of dog-human and horse-human attachment bonds

    | Contributor(s):: Payne, E., Dearaugo, J., Bennett, P., McGreevy, P.

    This article reviews evidence for the existence of attachment bonds directed toward humans in dog-human and horse-human dyads. It explores each species' alignment with the four features of a typical attachment bond: separation-related distress, safe haven, secure base and proximity seeking. While...

  20. Cognition and learning in horses (Equus caballus): what we know and why we should ask more

    | Contributor(s):: Brubaker, L., Udell, M. A. R.

    Horses (Equus caballus) have a rich history in their relationship with humans. Across different cultures and eras they have been utilized for work, show, cultural rituals, consumption, therapy, and companionship and continue to serve in many of these roles today. As one of the most commonly...