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  1. Intestinal parasites and risk factors in dogs and cats from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Contributor(s):: Arruda, I. F., Ramos, R. C. F., Barbosa, A. da S., Abboud, L. C. de S., Reis, I. C. dos, Millar, P. R., Amendoeira, M. R. R.

  2. Digging down into the global urban past

    Contributor(s):: Hart, Emma, Dantas, Mariana

  3. The earliest domestic cat on the Silk Road

    Contributor(s):: Haruda, A. F., Miller, A. R. V., Paijmans, J. L. A., Barlow, A., Tazhekeyev, A., Bilalov, S., Hesse, Y., Preick, M., King, T., Thomas, R., Harke, H., Arzhantseva, I.

  4. Toxoplasma gondii in domiciled dogs and cats in urban areas of Brazil: risk factors and spatial distribution

    Contributor(s):: Arruda, I. F., Millar, P. R., Barbosa, A. da S., Abboud, L. C. de S., Reis, I. C. dos, Moreira, A. S. da C., Guimaraes, M. P. de P., Amendoeira, M. R. R.

  5. Coexistence of diversified dog socialities and territorialities in the city of Concepcion, Chile

    Contributor(s):: Miternique, H. C., Gaunet, F.

  6. Using resident-based hazing programs to reduce human–coyote conflicts in urban environments

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Mary Ann Bonnell, Stewart W. Breck

    The concept of hazing (aversive conditioning) is often promoted as a tool for reducing human–coyote (Canis latrans) conflicts in urban environments. Little scientific evidence exists on the effectiveness of hazing, particularly hazing applied by residents (i.e., community-level hazing)....

  7. Evaluating lethal and nonlethal management options for urban coyotes

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Stewart W. Breck, Sharon A. Poessel, Mary Ann Bonnell

    Human–coyote (Canis latrans) conflict in urban environments is a growing issue in cities throughout the United States, with the primary problem being the development of problem individuals that are overly bold and aggressive with people and pets. Little research has focused on management...

  8. Eastern Grey Kangaroo (Macropus giganteus) Vigilance Behaviour Varies between Human-Modified and Natural Environments

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Georgina Hume, Elizabeth Brunton, Scott Burnett

    Rapid increases in urban land use extent across the globe are creating challenges for many wildlife species. Urban landscapes present a novel environment for many species, yet our understanding of wildlife behavioural adaptations to urban environments is still poor. This study compared the...

  9. Synanthropic Suburbia

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sarah Gunawan

    Animals are invading the city. Coyotes are sighted on downtown streets with greater frequency, raccoons notoriously forage through greenbins as their primary source of food, and all forms of animals inhabit the surfaces, edges and cavities of the built environment. Once wild animals are now...

  10. The urban forest project as an extension of landscape immersion and a way to support community engagement in the Ragunan Zoo, Jakarta

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Yulia Nurliani Lukito

    This article examines necessary elements to be considered in designing urban forest at the Ragunan Zoo, Jakarta, as part of increasing the role of the zoo to educate people on animals and their habitats. The purpose of the community project conducted by the Architectural Team from the...

  11. Music Festival Makes Hedgehogs Move: How Individuals Cope Behaviorally in Response to Human-Induced Stressors

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Wanja Rast, Leon M.F. Barthel, Anne Berger

    Understanding the impact of human activities on wildlife behavior and fitness can improve their sustainability. In a pilot study, we wanted to identify behavioral responses to anthropogenic stress in an urban species during a semi-experimental field study. We equipped eight urban hedgehogs...

  12. Coyote (Canis latrans) diet in an urban environment: variation relative to pet conflicts, housing density, and season

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: S. A. Poessel, E. C. Mock, S. W. Breck

    Coyotes (Canis latrans Say, 1823) are highly successful in urbanized environments, but as they populate cities, conflict can occur and often manifests in the form of incidents with pets. To better understand whether coyotes view pets as prey or, alternatively, as competitors or a threat,...

  13. Large Terrestrial Bird Adapting Behavior in an Urbanized Zone

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Eduardo R. Alexandrino, Juliano A. Bogoni, Ana B. Navarro, Alex A. A. Bovo, Rafael M. Gonçalves, Jacob D. Charters, Juan A. Domini, Katia M. P. M. B. Ferraz

    Wildlife living within urban ecosystems have to adapt or perish. Red-legged Seriema, a large terrestrial bird, are rare in urban ecosystems, however, they have been reported in a medium-sized Brazilian city. We investigated the reasons for this occurrence as well as their behavior. We assessed...

  14. The cohabitation of humans and urban cats in the anthropocene: the clash of welfare concepts

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jaros, F.

    Urban environments are inhabited by several types of feline populations, which we can differentiate as feral cats, free-roaming pets, and confined pets. Due to a shift in the cultural representation of cats from pest controllers to companion animals, cats living semi-independently of humans are...

  15. Space Use and Movement of Urban Bobcats

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Julie K. Young, Julie Golla, John P. Draper, Derek Broman, Terry Blankenship, Richard Heilbrun

    Global urbanization is rapidly changing the landscape for wildlife species that must learn to persist in declining wild spacing, adapt, or risk extinction. Many mesopredators have successfully exploited urban niches, and research on these species in an urban setting offers insights into the...

  16. Goats in Schools: Parental Attitudes and Perceived Benefits

    | Contributor(s):: Loyd, Destiny D., King, Elizabeth G., Thompson, Jennifer J.

  17. Space use by resident and transient coyotes in an urban–rural landscape mosaic

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Numi Mitchell, MichaelW. Strohbach, Ralph Pratt, Wendy C. Finn, Eric G. Strauss

    Context. Coyotes (Canis latrans) have adapted successfully to human landscape alteration in the past 150 years and in recent decades have successfully moved into urban areas. While this causes concern about human–wildlife conflicts, research also suggests that coyotes tend to avoid humans...

  18. The non-visual image of the city: how blind and visually impaired white cane users conceptualize urban space

    | Contributor(s):: Šakaja, Laura

  19. Environmental factors influencing the occurrence of coyotes and conflicts in urban areas

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sharon A. Poessel, Eric M. Gese, Julie K. Young

    The increase of global urbanization can have effects on wildlife species, including carnivores such as coyotes (Canis latrans). As coyotes continue to settle in more urban areas, reports of human-coyote conflicts, such as attacks on humans or pets, may also increase. Understanding environmental...

  20. Public Perceptions and Knowledge of, and Responses to, Bats in Urban Areas in Peninsular Malaysia

    | Contributor(s):: Lim, Voon-Ching, Wilson, John-James

    Urbanization has resulted in the loss of natural habitat for many bat species, often placing bats in close proximity to humans. Bats are generally perceived as agricultural and medical pests, despite providing ecosystem services including seed dispersal and pollination. Understanding public...