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Tags: Alternative methods + Laboratory animal science

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  1. A study of three IACUCs and their views of scientific merit and alternatives

    Contributor(s):: Graham, K.

    Two ethical issues facing Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees (IACUCs) today are assessing scientific merit and the use of alternatives in research proposals. This study evaluated 3 IACUCs using a 19-question survey, with a 77.8% response rate. Although 76% of members answered that...

  2. Animal experimentation in cancer research: a citation analysis

    Contributor(s):: Dagg, A. I.

    Cancer research involves the use of millions of nonhuman animals and billions of dollars in public funds each year, but cures for the disease remain elusive. This article suggests ways to reduce the use of animals and save money by identifying articles that garnered few citations over the 9 years...

  3. FRAME: the early days. (Special Issue: Animal experimentation and the Three Rs: past, present, and future.)

    Contributor(s):: Rowan, A. N.

  4. The three Rs at the beginning of the 21st Century. Proceedings of the fourth world congress on alternatives and animal use in the life sciences, New Orleans, LA, USA, 11-15 August 2002

    Contributor(s):: Balls, M., Firmani, D., Rowan, A. N.

  5. The three Rs at the beginning of the 21st century. Proceedings of the fourth world congress on alternatives and animal use in the life sciences, New Orleans, LA, USA, 11-15 August 2002

    Contributor(s):: Balls, M., Firmani, D., Rowan, A. N.

  6. The three Rs: the way forward. The report and recommendations of ECVAM Workshop 11

    Contributor(s):: Balls, M., Goldberg, A. M., Fentem, J. H., Broadhead, C. L., Burch, R. L., Festing, M. F. W., Frazier, J. M., Hendriksen, C. F. M., Jennings, M., Kamp, M. D. O. van der, Morton, D. P., Rowan, A. N., Russell, C., Russell, W. M. S., Spielmann, H., Stephens, M. L., Stokes, W. S., Straughan, D. W., Yager, J. D., Zurlo, J., Zutphen, B. F. M. van

  7. Death is a welfare issue

    Contributor(s):: Yeates, J. W.

    It is commonly asserted that "death is not a welfare issue" and this has been reflected in welfare legislation and policy in many countries. However, this creates a conflict for many who consider animal welfare to be an appropriate basis for decision-making in animal ethics but also consider that...

  8. The ethical limits of domestication: a critique of Henry Heffner's arguments

    Contributor(s):: Allen, C., Bekoff, M., Gruen, L.

    Henry E. Heffner argues that "animals bred for research are properly viewed as animals who have successfully invaded the laboratory niche, relying heavily on kin selection to perpetuate their genes." (1999, p. 134). This view of human-animal interactions is the cornerstone of his...

  9. Effective searching of the scientific literature for alternatives: search grids for appropriate databases

    Contributor(s):: Hart, L. A., Wood, M. W., Weng, H. Y.

    Researchers searching for alternatives to painful procedures that involve animals may find that the dispersed relevant literature and the array of databases make the search challenging and even onerous. This paper addresses a significant gap that exists for researchers, in identifying appropriate...

  10. Ethics and welfare of animals used in education: an overview

    Contributor(s):: King, L. A.

    Ethical, regulatory and scientific issues arise from the use of animals in education, from secondary level schooling through to veterinary and medical training. A utilitarian cost-benefit analysis can be used to assess whether animals should be used in scientific education. The 'benefit' aspect...

  11. The educative role of an animal care committee in Canada: a case study

    Contributor(s):: Bowd, A. D.

  12. The ethics of the Three Rs principle: a reconsideration

    Contributor(s):: Vorstenbosch, J. M. G.

    In the past decades the Three Rs concept, famously launched by Russell and Burch in their 1959 book The Principles of Humane Experimental Technique, has gained a prominent place in the landscape of societal and ethical concern about animal use. Important scientific and institutional initiatives...

  13. The interplay between replacement, reduction and refinement: considerations where the Three Rs interact

    Contributor(s):: Boo, M. J. de, Rennie, A. E., Buchanan-Smith, H. M., Hendriksen, C. F. M.

    Russell and Burch's Three Rs principle of replacement, reduction and refinement offers a useful concept for the scientific and ethical evaluation of the use of animals in scientific procedures. Replacement, reduction and refinement are often considered separately, but when applied, one of the...

  14. The Three Rs in the pharmaceutical industry: perspectives of scientists and regulators

    Contributor(s):: Fenwick, N. P., Fraser, D.

    Six drug regulatory reviewers and 11 pharmaceutical industry scientists were interviewed to explore their perspectives on the obstacles and opportunities for greater implementation of the Three Rs (replacement, reduction, refinement) in drug research and development. Participants generally...

  15. The Three Rs: past, present and future

    Contributor(s):: Russell, W. M. S.

  16. Ethics: views from IACUC members

    Contributor(s):: Houde, L., Dumas, C., Leroux, T.

    Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) members were interviewed on various ethical matters, including ethics, animal ethics, science and ethics, and the use of animals in research, in order to explore their implicit ethical framework. The results revealed that IACUC members entertain...

  17. The moral standing of non-human primates: why they merit special consideration

    Contributor(s):: Sauer, U. G.

    Scientific experiments with non-human primates are viewed very controversially. Those who use non-human primates for scientific purposes contend that the results will be of great benefit to humans. They say that the distress to the animals is minimal and that, therefore, their experiments are...